HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Boonton Township, NJ

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 HRT For Men Boonton Township, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Boonton Township, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Boonton Township, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Boonton Township, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Boonton Township, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Boonton Township, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Boonton Township, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Boonton Township, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Boonton Township, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Boonton Township, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Boonton Township, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Boonton Township, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Boonton Township, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Boonton Township, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Boonton Township, NJ

NJ Transit suspends rail service after locomotive engineers fail to show up for work

NEWARK, N.J. -- NJ Transit rail service was suspended Friday evening, stranding commuters trying to get home.The final Northeast Corridor train left Penn Station at 7:43 p.m.The MTA says because of the suspension, the Metro-North Railroad's Pascack Valley and Port Jervis lines are being impacted. Both are operated by NJ Transit.NJ Transit was accepting rail tickets on NJ Transit and private carrier buses, all three NJ Transit light rail lines, the PATH from 33rd Street in New York, Hoboken and Newark Pen...

NEWARK, N.J. -- NJ Transit rail service was suspended Friday evening, stranding commuters trying to get home.

The final Northeast Corridor train left Penn Station at 7:43 p.m.

The MTA says because of the suspension, the Metro-North Railroad's Pascack Valley and Port Jervis lines are being impacted. Both are operated by NJ Transit.

NJ Transit was accepting rail tickets on NJ Transit and private carrier buses, all three NJ Transit light rail lines, the PATH from 33rd Street in New York, Hoboken and Newark Penn. NY Waterway also said they would cross-honor NJ Transit customers on all ferry routes for the rest of the day.

Secaucus Junction was essentially a ghost town Friday night. Countless travelers and commuters were left scrambling when the last train rolled out at 8:22 p.m.

Passengers were grateful to board that last outbound train to Suffern, but for many, the trip had already been a slog.

"It's been incredibly frustrating. I can't imagine the people that don't even know what's going on, getting ready to get on a 9, 10 p.m. train," New York City resident Dylan Kyles told CBS2's Nick Caloway.

Those who missed the last few trains had few options.

Pearl River resident Michele Sparrow had to get an Uber.

"And then as soon as I got in the Uber, the driver told me he can't go to New York, so now I'm just waiting for another one," she said.

Watch Thalia Perez's report

At Penn Station, the last New Jersey-bound train to Dover left just after 8 p.m., and many who didn't realize that was their last option were left scrambling without a plan.

Trina Holden told CBS2's Thalia Perez she was blindsided by the sudden service interruption and missed the train.

"I live in Jersey and I work in the city. This is frustrating for the last minute, for nobody to tell us nothing. Everybody is going crazy, don't know what's going on. It's just really not fair," she said.

Many riders who spoke to CBS2 said they didn't know they could use their tickets to take an NJ Transit bus or other alternative, as the information and ticket counters were all shut down.

The problems started in the middle of the morning rush. From Newark to New York City, delays and cancellations lit up the board and caused riders' tempers to flare.

"I was on the North Jersey Coast Line. I should be home by now and all I'm seeing is cancellations. But this is NJ Transit. 'Just train bad,' that's their tag line," said Steve Cody of Middletown.

More than 30 trains were canceled Friday morning after locomotive engineers failed to show up for work. Things did not improve in the afternoon.

"People are running all around. They're changing it at the last minute. It's terrible," a rider told CBS2's Christina Fan.

The Atlantic City, Main-Bergen County, Montclair-Boonton, Morris and Essex, Northeast Corridor and North Jersey Coast lines were impacted, among others.

Commuters were told to wait at their stations for the next available train. Wait times ranged from 10 minutes to more than an hour.

"Yeah, there's a delay and we really have to get there soon so we can get back," another rider said.

"I was going to take the 2:46 or something. It's canceled. So now I just have to wait," said Barbara Jackson of Queens.

NJ Transit blamed the problems on an illegal job action by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen. A spokesperson said the number of engineers who called out sick Friday was nearly triple the rate of an average weekday.

NJ Transit admitted it heard rumors about this late Thursday. It was unclear what, if anything, was done in preparation.

"I waited, like, five trains, and they were all canceled," New York City resident Yesi Mendez said.

"Like, seven of them have been canceled," Upper West Side resident Tom Francesconi said.

When CBS2 caught up with Francesconi, he was two and a half hours into a one-hour trip to Suffern.

"I mean, I don't know why they all don't want to come in and drive the trains. I'm sure they make more money than a lot of people, so just frustrating that they don't want to come in and do their job," he said.

"New Jersey Transit is the culprit here. The unions suffer and the commuters suffer, and New Jersey Transit simply doesn't care," Cody said.

"They should have negotiated, but without disturbing everybody else's life," another rider said.

Charlton D'Souza, of the transit advocacy group Passengers United, was critical of the way NJ Transit informed passengers of the service cancelation and says the agency should have given passenger more notice.

"I'm ashamed of NJ Transit. I'm ashamed of the governor and the way they've handled this. I'm sorry, NJ Transit passengers pay a lot of money for their monthly tickets and weekly tickets, and they deserve better than this," he said.

NJ Transit sources told us a disagreement with the union involves Juneteenth. The union is demanding off on the holiday, which was offered in the new collective bargaining agreement it has not signed.

NJ Transit released the following statement:

NJ TRANSIT became aware of a rumor late in the day yesterday that the locomotive engineers' union, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen (BLE&T), could potentially initiate an illegal job action today. With today's engineer call outs at nearly triple the rate of an average weekday, it is clear that this is the result of an illegal job action. NJ TRANSIT is disappointed that the union would perpetrate such an act on the more than 100,000 commuters who depend on NJ TRANSIT rail service every day. We intend to explore all legal remedies in response to this illegal and irresponsible action.

CBS2 did ask NJ Transit for an interview, but they declined. We also reached out to the union but have not yet received a response.

Christina Fan

Christina Fan joined CBS2 News as a general assignment reporter in spring of 2019.

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NJ authorities help surrendered ‘unwanted’ baby, the first in 2 years

The New Jersey Department of Children and Families said Monday that a healthy newborn was brought to one of the state's Safe Haven sites in May, the first such surrender of 2022.No infants were given up in 2021. That made last year the first since the state's Safe Haven law was enacted in 2000 that there were no surrenders.The previous low for a calendar year had been two, in 2007, 2012, 2016 and 2017; 10 babies were...

The New Jersey Department of Children and Families said Monday that a healthy newborn was brought to one of the state's Safe Haven sites in May, the first such surrender of 2022.

No infants were given up in 2021. That made last year the first since the state's Safe Haven law was enacted in 2000 that there were no surrenders.

The previous low for a calendar year had been two, in 2007, 2012, 2016 and 2017; 10 babies were safely surrendered in 2006.

Regarding last month's surrender, in its release DCF did not disclose the gender of the infant nor the exact date and location, citing confidentiality statutes.

It is the 79th surrender in the state in the last 22 years.

Since August 2000, the Safe Haven law has allowed infants up to 30 days old to be anonymously surrendered at a number of destinations in New Jersey that are staffed 24/7. According to DCF, those include hospital emergency rooms, police and fire stations, or ambulance and rescue squads.

Any child given up must be "free of abuse or neglect," DCF said in the release.

DCF's Division of Child Permanency and Protection works to have any surrendered baby fostered or adopted once they are cleared by a medical professional.

Anyone seeking further information about the Safe Haven law can visit njsafehaven.org or call 1-877-839-2339.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

These are the best hiking spots in New Jersey

A trip to New Jersey doesn't have to be all about the beach. Our state has some incredible trails, waterfalls, and lakes to enjoy.

From the Pine Barrens to the Appalachian Trail to the hidden gems of New Jersey, you have plenty of options for a great hike. Hiking is such a great way to spend time outdoors and enjoy nature, plus it's a great workout.

Before you go out on the trails and explore some of our listeners' suggestions, I have some tips on hiking etiquette from the American Hiking Society.

If you are going downhill and run into an uphill hiker, step to the side and give the uphill hiker space. A hiker going uphill has the right of way unless they stop to catch their breath.

Always stay on the trail, you may see side paths, unless they are marked as an official trail, steer clear of them. By going off-trail you may cause damage to the ecosystems around the trail, the plants, and wildlife that live there.

You also do not want to disturb the wildlife you encounter, just keep your distance from the wildlife and continue hiking.

Bicyclists should yield to hikers and horses. Hikers should also yield to horses, but I’m not sure how many horses you will encounter on the trails in New Jersey.

If you are thinking of bringing your dog on your hike, they should be leashed, and make sure to clean up all pet waste.

Lastly, be mindful of the weather, if the trail is too muddy, it's probably best to save your hike for another day.

I asked our listeners for their suggestions of the best hiking spots in New Jersey, check out their suggestions:

Tillman Ravine near stokes state forest! Following the stream to larger pools in the spring and summer are so nice to walk through! It is beautiful and so lush green!

South Mountain Reservation Fairy Trail. Not really hiking, more of a walk in the woods but so much fun with kids. They get to look for fairy houses while you walk and end at a stream they can go in when it’s warm or throw rocks in.

The backside of Stairway to Heaven from Barry lakes — high breeze wildflowers lead to beautiful wooden bridge over peaceful stream amidst peaceful serenity of the quiet woods.

Every NJ city and town's municipal tax bill, ranked

A little less than 30 cents of every $1 in property taxes charged in New Jersey support municipal services provided by cities, towns, townships, boroughs and villages. Statewide, the average municipal-only tax bill in 2021 was $2,725, but that varied widely from more than $13,000 in Tavistock to nothing in three townships. In addition to $9.22 billion in municipal purpose taxes, special taxing districts that in some places provide municipal services such as fire protection, garbage collection or economic development levied $323.8 million in 2021.

Gallery Credit: Michael Symons

More than $5,000

Municipality | County | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Tavistock | Camden | $13,182 | 42.9% | $131,563

Allenhurst | Monmouth | $9,033 | 53.4% | $2,842,245

Deal | Monmouth | $8,824 | 44.7% | $8,034,955

Orange | Essex | $7,677 | 73.8% | $55,663,138

Mantoloking | Ocean | $7,560 | 39.2% | $4,137,248

Elizabeth | Union | $6,419 | 62.0% | $172,688,087 | $475,000

Passaic | Passaic | $6,169 | 60.1% | $66,523,222

Millburn | Essex | $6,084 | 24.8% | $46,789,178

Irvington | Essex | $6,049 | 71.4% | $78,599,287 | $455,893

Englewood | Bergen | $6,048 | 44.8% | $58,156,397

Cresskill | Bergen | $5,659 | 32.1% | $17,163,359

Plainfield | Union | $5,311 | 58.8% | $59,058,985 | $161,323

Paterson | Passaic | $5,250 | 59.5% | $163,056,241

Harrison | Hudson | $5,211 | 51.5% | $17,890,904

$4,000 to $5,000

Municipality | County | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Chester Borough | Morris | $4,946 | 35.6% | $3,924,821

$3,000 to $4,000

Municipality | County | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Summit | Union | $3,982 | 21.8% | $30,144,083 | $267,878

$2,000 to $3,000

Municipality | County | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Matawan | Monmouth | $2,999 | 30.1% | $9,722,229

$1,000 to $2,000

Less than $1,000

Longport Borough | $4,126 | 37.1% | $6,820,536

Willingboro Township | $2,878 | 45.5% | $34,180,383

Municipality | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Tavistock Borough | $13,182 | 42.9% | $131,563

Municipality | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Municipality | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Bridgeton City | $2,057 | 57.5% | $13,929,773

Municipality | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Orange City | $7,677 | 73.8% | $55,663,138

Municipality | Average Municipal Tax Bill | Share of Property Tax Bill | Municipal Tax Levy | Special Taxing Districts (if applicable)

Clinton Town | $2,987 | 26.3% | $3,459,859

Princeton | $4,291 | 20.9% | $36,777,578

New Jersey's license plate designs through the years

Friday’s credit card outage shows how vulnerable NJ is (Opinion)

Ever feel we are sometimes too reliant on technology? I’m sure many in New Jersey did Friday afternoon. This didn’t receive much mainstream media attention but it was all over social media.Indeed not only were people making purchases scrambling by paying with checks there was an above normal run on atms for cash withdrawals.It’s being called a major outage of credit and debit cards, both Visa and Mastercard. Chase Bank runs the network that handles these and was ...

Ever feel we are sometimes too reliant on technology? I’m sure many in New Jersey did Friday afternoon. This didn’t receive much mainstream media attention but it was all over social media.

Indeed not only were people making purchases scrambling by paying with checks there was an above normal run on atms for cash withdrawals.

It’s being called a major outage of credit and debit cards, both Visa and Mastercard. Chase Bank runs the network that handles these and was having major problems.

It inconvenienced customers not only across New Jersey but also in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Connecticut, Kentucky and beyond.

I remember the Northeast blackout of 2003 that affected not only that part of the country but extended all the way out to Michigan where I lived at the time. I was trying to buy bags of ice at a 7-Eleven, as was everybody trying to save the food in their now useless refrigerators.

The store of course couldn’t process anything electronically. It was a cash-only situation for which most people were unprepared. Customers were screaming at workers for not having the old-fashioned carbon paper swipe machines. It was bedlam.

A major technology fail recently hit my boys’ ophthalmologist’s office. They were so reliant on technology with no backup system that when it crashed and burned, they couldn’t make new appointments, couldn’t access patient records, couldn’t look up a past prescription or do any function of business. It shut them down literally for weeks.

We’ve gotten so used to technology always being there for us that society can come to a grinding halt when it fails. And it is in that moment we see just how much of technology’s slave we have become.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite afternoon radio show any day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now.

'A lack of qualified manpower': Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad ceases operations

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad answered its first call on the morning of Aug. 25, 1938, when Herbert Romine lost control of his motorcycle on Beverwyck Road, crashed and broke his leg.The responders arrived at the scene in seven minutes and delivered Romine to Morristown Memorial Hospital in 29 minutes, according to a newspaper account.The question now is when or if the volunteer squad will answer a call again. On Monday the squad announced that it would cease operations until at least Jan. 3, 2022.Of...

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad answered its first call on the morning of Aug. 25, 1938, when Herbert Romine lost control of his motorcycle on Beverwyck Road, crashed and broke his leg.

The responders arrived at the scene in seven minutes and delivered Romine to Morristown Memorial Hospital in 29 minutes, according to a newspaper account.

The question now is when or if the volunteer squad will answer a call again. On Monday the squad announced that it would cease operations until at least Jan. 3, 2022.

Officers in the organization cite "a lack of qualified manpower to fill organizational roles and maintenance issues with both of our ambulances," according to social media posts.

"The decision to do so did not come easy nor was it a unanimous vote amongst our Membership," the officers wrote. "With these circumstances at play, and for the continued safety and welfare of the population we serve, it was best decided to work on recruitment to obtain a level of membership we are comfortable with and to find permanent solutions to our ongoing ambulance maintenance issues."

'A huge loss'

By contract, Boonton residents will continue to be covered by Saint Clare’s Hospital-based EMS squads weekdays from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Parsippany EMS will cover Mountain Lakes. Boonton Township, which the squad used to cover, contracted separately with Saint Clare's in 2019.

50 years?:Morristown man accused of killing 3-year-old faces elevated charge, is offered plea deal

The Morris County Office of Emergency Management EMS, or one of its dispatched designees, will cover calls for service from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weeknights and on weekend days and nights.

"This is a huge loss to the Tri-Town area," said Sen. Anthony Bucco, a 40-year volunteer member of the Boonton Fire Department. "These dedicated individuals that respond to emergency calls know their neighbors when they arrive on the scene, and that relationship is irreplaceable. I know firsthand how important that is when a tragedy hits."

The squad said it answered 800 calls last year.

Bucco said he called on the state and municipalities "to do more to support these volunteers and make it easier for them to receive the training they need to continue their service." Bucco said he's available to meet with the squad and the towns to see if anything can be done to reverse the decision.

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad operates on donations and does not charge for its services. It is not the only volunteer squad feeling the pinch of money and manpower in recent years.

Citing similar problems and other complications resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, the 93-year-old Belmar First Aid Squad announced its closure in March. The North Haledon EMT headquarters was sold late last year after a shortage of volunteers forced that squad to disband. Volunteer squads in Rochelle Park and Maywood shut down in 2018.

Boonton officers stressed that "at this time, this is not a final cease of operations but rather a reorganization effort."

"For just over 80 years, we have been blessed by the communities serviced and countless number of lives saved through various life-safety measures," they wrote. "To continue our mission, we must re-define who we are and what we mean to the communities we render aid to. Our current plan is to return in full operation on January 3rd, 2022, at 6 p.m."

Boonton town officials note a decline in volunteerism going back to 1997 that forced the town to hire a limited paid staff. A "lack of sustainable donations" forced the town to lay off that paid staff in 2015.

"The average annual cost for that program alone was $80,000," the town website shows. "In addition, we have maintained an operating budget of roughly $100,000 per year."

Financial aid:NJ residents struggling to make rent payments have until Dec. 15 to apply for rental aid

Morris County OEM Director Jeff Paul said he was not aware of any other similar first-aid or EMS squad closures recently in Morris County, and his department is working with Boonton to help it get back up and running in January.

"This is the first one, and we're hoping it's short-lived," Paul said. "The beauty of it is we have a county system that can fill some holes while they're doing it. Not just us, with our partners. The Boonton model will be supported by Morris County plus Saint Clare's plus Par-Troy. We're all in this together to support Boonton Kiwanis."

Paul confirmed that the COVID pandemic had a negative impact on first-aid squads in terms of both recruitment and attrition.

"COVID has changed the face of volunteerism," Paul said. "Individuals are concerned about having a greater level of exposure, and I think you had members with pre-existing conditions who were still volunteering out of the goodness of their heart." When COVID struck, it brought about a change, he said.

"Some obviously got sick. Others, acting on advice of their doctors, realized it might be very dangerous right now," Paul said.

Fortunately in Morris County, which generally follows a volunteer model, the commissioners in designing the county EMS system made it "mandatory that we support volunteerism and fill gaps," Paul said.

Residents of the towns responded to the announcement with alarm on social media.

"After putting a decade of service in myself it is sad to see the organization come to this," J.W. Moorhouse posted on the Boonton Townshippers Facebook page. "I hope that the administration is able to get the proper people in place to bring the squad back to the days where we were able to staff two full ambulances at a time with five people per crew."

"We all will hope new members will sign up so we do not permanently lose you all, but want you to know just how much you all are appreciated by our family and so many others in town," Wendy Crans posted on the Boonton NJ Facebook page.

The squad is raising funds through its annual poinsettia sale. Details can be found on the Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad Facebook page.

William Westhoven is a local reporter for DailyRecord.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Email: [email protected]dailyrecord.com

As renovations continue, historic Boonton library to host first book festival

What better way to show off extensive renovations at the historic Boonton Holmes Library than to have it host the town's first-ever book festival?With many interior and exterior improvements completed, the nonprofit Boonton Main Street organization conducted a groundbreaking Friday for a new backyard courtyard that will include a stage for intimate outdoor performances and events.The Boonton Books and Beyond Festival will welcome more than 30 authors and presenters at the library, the Boonton Coffee Company and t...

What better way to show off extensive renovations at the historic Boonton Holmes Library than to have it host the town's first-ever book festival?

With many interior and exterior improvements completed, the nonprofit Boonton Main Street organization conducted a groundbreaking Friday for a new backyard courtyard that will include a stage for intimate outdoor performances and events.

The Boonton Books and Beyond Festival will welcome more than 30 authors and presenters at the library, the Boonton Coffee Company and the Boonton Elks Lodge from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Nov. 13.

With support from Boonton Mayor Richard Corcoran, the event was conceived "as a celebration of New Jersey’s own homegrown artists and authors, whether hailing from or based in the Garden State."

“We are delighted with the overwhelmingly positive response from so many of the state’s outstanding writers,” said Tracy Pryer, Boonton’s director of recreation and festival co-chair. “The events will all be in-person, with appropriate COVID precautions in place, of course. So it’s a great opportunity for book lovers to meet and interact with authors.”

The participants represent a wide range of genres, including literary fiction, mystery, children’s picture books, TV scripts, comic books and more.

The festival presents a homecoming opportunity for Boonton Township native Gina Ippolito, who recently completed a two-year run as a scriptwriter for the CBS sitcom "The Unicorn."

"I think it's very cool that Boonton and Boonton Township and the surrounding areas have produced so many prolific writers with varied resumes," said Ippolito, who also wrote for the "Murphy Brown" reboot. "I'm excited to hear all of them speak. I think the whole town should be, too."

Ippolito recalls spending time at the Holmes Library as a child when her mother would study there for a graduate degree.

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"She would just park me in the kids' section and I would devour the books until we left," Ippolito said. "It was one of my favorite places. I still have some of the free bookmarks they gave out."

Also appearing will be former Daily Record journalist Lorraina Ash, editor of the award-winning book "Corona City: One Anthology’s Remarkable Journey." Four contributing writers will join her for a discussion about the book, which compiled first-person stories and photography that follows life during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic in the New York-New Jersey region.

Festival events are free. Signed books from the presenters will be available for purchase.

“The festival schedule features more than 25 presentations in separate venues throughout the day,” library Director Lotte Newlin said. “That way, there will be something for all interests at any given time. Audiences should definitely plan to make a day of attending.”

Steven Kampschmidt, president of Boonton Main Street, said he hopes the festival will bring patronage to restaurants in town, some of which will feature a special prix-fixe lunch menu for the day.

“It’s great to have the participation of our fine eating establishments," he said. "It’s another excellent reason to visit Boonton on November 13.”

Library renovation

Presenters and visitors will find extensive renovations have already been completed at the library, including a bright new blue exterior color chosen to be appropriate for the Victorian Era, when the library was established at the top of Main Street and the corner of Boonton Avenue.

James Holmes donated the former residence in 1870 to be used as a library. The library received a makeover in 2010 after it was deeded over to the town.

More recently, a grant of $221,360 in 2020 from the Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund helped fund partial exterior restoration of the south, east and west elevations, including repairs to the siding and trim, restoration of wood windows, and painting.

Visit the festival website at www.boontonbooks.org for more information.

William Westhoven is a local reporter for DailyRecord.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

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