HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Boonton Township, NJ

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 HRT For Men Boonton Township, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Boonton Township, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Boonton Township, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
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Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Boonton Township, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Boonton Township, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Boonton Township, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Boonton Township, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

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What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

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Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Boonton Township, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Boonton Township, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Boonton Township, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Boonton Township, NJ

The Town of Boonton Approves Plan for Main Street Neighborhood Program

The Town of Boonton Approves Plan for Main Street Neighborhood ProgramTHE TOWN OF BOONTON will receive up to $150,000 a year in state and local funds to rejuvenate Boonton’s Historic Downtown District.The program, administered by the Neighborhood Preservation Program (NPP) of the NJ Department of Community Affairs (NJDCA), is for up to five years, with the town providing up to $25,000 from the municipal budget each year. Public participation was a major component in determining the desires of the community. The program wi...

The Town of Boonton Approves Plan for Main Street Neighborhood Program

THE TOWN OF BOONTON will receive up to $150,000 a year in state and local funds to rejuvenate Boonton’s Historic Downtown District.

The program, administered by the Neighborhood Preservation Program (NPP) of the NJ Department of Community Affairs (NJDCA), is for up to five years, with the town providing up to $25,000 from the municipal budget each year. Public participation was a major component in determining the desires of the community. The program will be managed by the local non-profit, Boonton Main Street, Inc.

Projects will include a façade grant program where Main Street business owners can receive up to $10,000 in funds toward rejuvenating their storefronts; requests over $5,000 require matching funds. A maintenance program for the district will include snow clearing, additional trash pickups during the summer months, routine debris and garbage removal, and 3-season flower urns. The Music on Main event, already beloved by residents, will be transformed into a summer concert series occurring on the first Fridays of June, July, and August. Main Street will be closed to vehicles to allow for outdoor dining and shopping while enjoying the many talented musical performances.

The Town Council unanimously approved the detailed NPP implementation plan at the April 4th public meeting.

Among other work already completed was initial consultation with major stakeholders and a survey of residents and business owners in the project area with nearly 500 responses. The annual budget also included funds for district-wide improvements. Examples of these projects are alleyway enhancements for passageways between Main Street and Plane Street with increased lighting, and replacing weathered banners along the light poles throughout the district. Each year’s budget must be approved by the town as well as NJDCA and NPP, provided the state continues its contributions to the program.

Boonton qualified for the program because of federal census income designations and was awarded the designation after a competitive grant application.

“We are looking for tangible improvements that affect how people feel about the area,” Steve Kampschmidt, Executive Director of Boonton Main Street, Inc. stated. “We are hoping to engage the community, support our businesses, entice new businesses, and create a vibrant downtown,” Steve added. “We want Boonton to be a destination that showcases its natural resources and honors its history.”

Morristown will accept cannabis business applications until April 13

Cannabis entrepreneurs can now apply for a retail or medical business license in Morristown.Town officials will award licenses for two marijuana businesses in the downtown area under regulations approved in December. Applicants have until April 13 to submit their proposals to Morristown.Morristown's ordinance allows two cannabis businesses to operate at a time around the town's core district along Morris and South streets and in the mixed-use district near Martin Luther King Avenue. The ordinance changes town zon...

Cannabis entrepreneurs can now apply for a retail or medical business license in Morristown.

Town officials will award licenses for two marijuana businesses in the downtown area under regulations approved in December. Applicants have until April 13 to submit their proposals to Morristown.

Morristown's ordinance allows two cannabis businesses to operate at a time around the town's core district along Morris and South streets and in the mixed-use district near Martin Luther King Avenue. The ordinance changes town zoning codes to allow for both recreational and medical dispensaries.

The use of marijuana in public spaces will not be allowed.

According to the ordinance, dispensaries cannot be within 200 feet of houses of worship or 1,000 feet of any school. Parking must be provided on-site, and no sampling is allowed in the business. The ordinance also limits hours of operation between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. from Monday through Saturday and noon to 8 p.m. on Sundays.

Morristown's five-member cannabis advisory board is responsible for reviewing business applications, but council members are responsible for granting licenses and oversight. Those looking to open a marijuana dispensary in town must have a state license. Applicants awarded a local license will have up to 18 months to secure state approval.

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New Jersey requires license applicants to secure a location and town approval before filing their application with the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory Commission. By state law, 2% of all dispensary sales will go to the town. In 2020, voters made New Jersey the 13th state to legalize marijuana for recreational use and Gov. Phil Murphy signed enabling legislation that allows individual towns to regulate the business within their border.

In Morristown, 77% of voters were in favor of legalizing the recreational use of cannabis in 2020. Across the state, two-thirds of voters approved legalization.

Across the state, roughly 29% of municipalities in New Jersey now welcome some semblance of the cannabis industry, after 35 towns that had previously prohibited all classes of cannabis businesses have since passed ordinances allowing at least one type of licensed cannabis business to operate within their borders.

Jessie Gomez is a local reporter for DailyRecord.com and NorthJersey.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

HS football Group classifications and key dates, with season starting Aug. 26

Further proof the New Jersey high school football season is near came Wednesday when the NJSIAA released its North-South group classifications for the 2022-2023 and 2023-2024 season.The NJSIAA released the sectional and group configurations for all five public school groups and the two non-public groups. Placement is based on school enrollment figures and geographic northing numbers.For the first time in NJSIAA history, seven overall group champions will be crowned.The 2022 football season opens the weekend of Aug. 26 (W...

Further proof the New Jersey high school football season is near came Wednesday when the NJSIAA released its North-South group classifications for the 2022-2023 and 2023-2024 season.

The NJSIAA released the sectional and group configurations for all five public school groups and the two non-public groups. Placement is based on school enrollment figures and geographic northing numbers.

For the first time in NJSIAA history, seven overall group champions will be crowned.

The 2022 football season opens the weekend of Aug. 26 (Week 0) with the remainder of the state opening the weekend of Sept. 1 (Week 1).

Other key football dates for the 2022 season:

Oct. 22: Public playoff cutoff

Oct. 23: Public state tournament seeding

Oct. 29: Non-Public playoff cutoff

Oct. 30: Non-Public state tournament seeding

Oct. 28-29: Public Round 1

Nov. 4-5: Public Round 2 & Non-Public Round 1

Nov. 11-12: Public sectional finals & Non-Public Round 2

Nov. 18-19: Public group semifinals & Non-Public semifinals

Nov. 26: Non-Public finals

Dec. 3: Public group finals Day 1

Dec. 4: Public group finals Day 2

Keep scrolling to see all the classifications for the next two football seasons. Schools listed in bold are new to the section.

NORTH 5

Bayonne, Bergen Tech, Bloomfield, Bridgewater-Raritan, Clifton, Columbia, Dickinson, East Orange, East Side, Elizabeth, Hackensack, Iselin Kennedy, J.P. Stevens, Kearny, Livingston, Memorial, Montclair, Morristown, North Bergen, Passaic Tech, Passaic, Paterson Eastside, Phillipsburg, Piscataway, Plainfield, Ridgewood, Union City, Union, Watchung Hills, West Orange, Westfield

NORTH 4

Barringer, Belleville, Bergenfield, Chatham, Cliffside Park (co-op with Ridgefield), Colonia, Fair Lawn, Ferris, Irvington, Linden, Middletown North, Millburn, Montgomery, Morris Knolls, Mount Olive, North Hunterdon, Northern Highlands, Orange, Palisades Park (co-op with Leonia), Paterson Kennedy, Rahway, Ramapo, Randolph, Ridge, Roxbury, Sayreville, Scotch Plains-Fanwood, Teaneck, Tenalfy, Wayne Valley, Woodbridge

NORTH 3

Cranford, Demarest, Dover, Dwight-Morrow, Fort Lee, Garfield, Gov. Livingston, Hackettstown, Hillside, Lincoln, Mendham, Montville, Morris Hills, North Plainfield, Nutley, Old Tappan, Paramus, Parsippany Hills, Pascack Valley, Passaic Valley, River Dell, Snyder, Sparta, Summit, Vernon, Voorhees, Warren Hills, Wayne Hills, West Essex, West Milford, West Morris

NORTH 2

Becton, Bernards, Caldwell, Dumont, Elmwood Park, Glen Rock, Hanover Park, Harrison, High Point, Indian Hills, Jefferson, Lakeland, Lenape Valley, Lodi, Lyndhurst, Madison, Mahwah, Manchester Regional, Newark Central, Newark Collegiate, Newton, Parsippany, Pascack Hills, Pequannock, Pompton Lakes, Ramsey, Ridgefield Park, Rutherford, Sussex Tech, West Side, Westwood

NORTH 1

Belvidere, Bogota, Boonton, Brearley, Butler, Cedar Grove, Cresskill, Emerson Boro, Glen Ridge, Hasbrouck Heights, Hawthorne, Hoboken, Hopatcong, Kinnelon, Kittatinny, Mountain Lakes, New Milford, North Arlington, North Warren, Park Ridge, Roselle Park, Saddle Brook, Secaucus, Shabazz, Verona, Waldrick (co-op with Midland Park), Wallington, Wallkill Valley, Weehawken, Weequahic, Whippany Park, Wood-Ridge

SOUTH 5

Atlantic City, Bridgeton, Cherokee, Cherry Hill East, East Brunswick, Eastern, Edison, Egg Harbor, Franklin, Freehold Township, Hillsborough, Howell, Hunterdon Central, Kingsway, Lenape, Marlboro, Monroe, New Brunswick, North Brunswick, Old Bridge, Perth Amboy, Rancocas Valley, South Brunswick, Southern, Toms River North, Trenton, Vineland, Washington Township, West Windsor-Plainsboro, Williamstown

SOUTH 4

Absegami, Brick Memorial, Brick Township, Central Regional, Cherry Hill West, Clearview, Colts Neck, Freehold Boro, Hamilton West, Hammonton, Hightstown, Jackson Memorial, Lacey, Lakewood, Long Branch, Mainland, Manalapan, Middletown South, Millville, Moorestown, Northern Burlington, Ocean City, Pennsauken, Princeton, Red Bank Regional, Shawnee, Steinert, Toms River East, Toms River South, Winslow

SOUTH 3

Allentown, Barnegat, Burlington Township, Camden, Camden Eastside, Carteret, Cedar Creek, Cumberland, Delsea, Deptford, Ewing, Highland, Holmdel, Hopewell Valley, Jackson Liberty, Lawrence, Manasquan, Manchester Township, Matawan, Neptune, Nottingham, Ocean Township, Pemberton, Pinelands, Robbinsville, Seneca, Somerville, South Plainfield, Timber Creek, Triton, Wall

SOUTH 2

Bordentown, Bound Brook, Cinnaminson, Collingswood, Dayton, Delaware Valley, Delran, Gloucester, Haddon Heights, Haddonfield, A.L. Johnson, Lindenwold, Lower Cape May, Mastery of Camden, Metuchen, Middle Township, Monmouth, New Providence, Oakcrest, Overbrook, Pleasantville, Point Pleasant Boro, Raritan, Roselle, Rumson-Fair Haven, South River, Spotswood, Sterling, West Deptford, Willingboro

SOUTH 1

Asbury Park, Audubon, Buena, Burlington City, Clayton, Dunellen, Florence, Gateway, Glassboro, Haddon Township, Highland Park, Keansburg, Keysport (co-op with Henry Hudson), KIPP: Cooper Norcross Academy, Manville, Maple Shade, Middlesex, New Egypt, Palmyra, Paulsboro, Penns Grove, Pennsville, Pitman, Point Pleasant Beach, Riverside, Salem, Schalick, Shore, South Hunterdon, Wildwood, Woodbury, Woodstown.

NON-PUBLIC A

Bergen Catholic; Camden Catholic; Delbarton; Don Bosco Prep; Donovan Catholic; Hudson Catholic; Notre Dame; Paramus Catholic; Paul VI; Pope John; Seton Hall Prep; St. Augustine; St. John Vianney (co-op with Ranney); St. Joseph (Met.); St. Joseph (Mont.); St. Peter’s Prep

NON-PUBLIC B

Bishop Eustace; DePaul; Gloucester Catholic; Holy Cross Prep; Holy Spirit; Immaculata; Montclair Immaculate; Montclair Kimberley; Morris Catholic; Morristown-Beard; Newark Academy; Pingry; Red Bank Catholic; St. Joseph (Hamm.); St. Mary (Ruth.); St. Thomas Aquinas

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'A lack of qualified manpower': Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad ceases operations

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad answered its first call on the morning of Aug. 25, 1938, when Herbert Romine lost control of his motorcycle on Beverwyck Road, crashed and broke his leg.The responders arrived at the scene in seven minutes and delivered Romine to Morristown Memorial Hospital in 29 minutes, according to a newspaper account.The question now is when or if the volunteer squad will answer a call again. On Monday the squad announced that it would cease operations until at least Jan. 3, 2022.Of...

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad answered its first call on the morning of Aug. 25, 1938, when Herbert Romine lost control of his motorcycle on Beverwyck Road, crashed and broke his leg.

The responders arrived at the scene in seven minutes and delivered Romine to Morristown Memorial Hospital in 29 minutes, according to a newspaper account.

The question now is when or if the volunteer squad will answer a call again. On Monday the squad announced that it would cease operations until at least Jan. 3, 2022.

Officers in the organization cite "a lack of qualified manpower to fill organizational roles and maintenance issues with both of our ambulances," according to social media posts.

"The decision to do so did not come easy nor was it a unanimous vote amongst our Membership," the officers wrote. "With these circumstances at play, and for the continued safety and welfare of the population we serve, it was best decided to work on recruitment to obtain a level of membership we are comfortable with and to find permanent solutions to our ongoing ambulance maintenance issues."

'A huge loss'

By contract, Boonton residents will continue to be covered by Saint Clare’s Hospital-based EMS squads weekdays from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Parsippany EMS will cover Mountain Lakes. Boonton Township, which the squad used to cover, contracted separately with Saint Clare's in 2019.

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The Morris County Office of Emergency Management EMS, or one of its dispatched designees, will cover calls for service from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weeknights and on weekend days and nights.

"This is a huge loss to the Tri-Town area," said Sen. Anthony Bucco, a 40-year volunteer member of the Boonton Fire Department. "These dedicated individuals that respond to emergency calls know their neighbors when they arrive on the scene, and that relationship is irreplaceable. I know firsthand how important that is when a tragedy hits."

The squad said it answered 800 calls last year.

Bucco said he called on the state and municipalities "to do more to support these volunteers and make it easier for them to receive the training they need to continue their service." Bucco said he's available to meet with the squad and the towns to see if anything can be done to reverse the decision.

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad operates on donations and does not charge for its services. It is not the only volunteer squad feeling the pinch of money and manpower in recent years.

Citing similar problems and other complications resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, the 93-year-old Belmar First Aid Squad announced its closure in March. The North Haledon EMT headquarters was sold late last year after a shortage of volunteers forced that squad to disband. Volunteer squads in Rochelle Park and Maywood shut down in 2018.

Boonton officers stressed that "at this time, this is not a final cease of operations but rather a reorganization effort."

"For just over 80 years, we have been blessed by the communities serviced and countless number of lives saved through various life-safety measures," they wrote. "To continue our mission, we must re-define who we are and what we mean to the communities we render aid to. Our current plan is to return in full operation on January 3rd, 2022, at 6 p.m."

Boonton town officials note a decline in volunteerism going back to 1997 that forced the town to hire a limited paid staff. A "lack of sustainable donations" forced the town to lay off that paid staff in 2015.

"The average annual cost for that program alone was $80,000," the town website shows. "In addition, we have maintained an operating budget of roughly $100,000 per year."

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Morris County OEM Director Jeff Paul said he was not aware of any other similar first-aid or EMS squad closures recently in Morris County, and his department is working with Boonton to help it get back up and running in January.

"This is the first one, and we're hoping it's short-lived," Paul said. "The beauty of it is we have a county system that can fill some holes while they're doing it. Not just us, with our partners. The Boonton model will be supported by Morris County plus Saint Clare's plus Par-Troy. We're all in this together to support Boonton Kiwanis."

Paul confirmed that the COVID pandemic had a negative impact on first-aid squads in terms of both recruitment and attrition.

"COVID has changed the face of volunteerism," Paul said. "Individuals are concerned about having a greater level of exposure, and I think you had members with pre-existing conditions who were still volunteering out of the goodness of their heart." When COVID struck, it brought about a change, he said.

"Some obviously got sick. Others, acting on advice of their doctors, realized it might be very dangerous right now," Paul said.

Fortunately in Morris County, which generally follows a volunteer model, the commissioners in designing the county EMS system made it "mandatory that we support volunteerism and fill gaps," Paul said.

Residents of the towns responded to the announcement with alarm on social media.

"After putting a decade of service in myself it is sad to see the organization come to this," J.W. Moorhouse posted on the Boonton Townshippers Facebook page. "I hope that the administration is able to get the proper people in place to bring the squad back to the days where we were able to staff two full ambulances at a time with five people per crew."

"We all will hope new members will sign up so we do not permanently lose you all, but want you to know just how much you all are appreciated by our family and so many others in town," Wendy Crans posted on the Boonton NJ Facebook page.

The squad is raising funds through its annual poinsettia sale. Details can be found on the Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad Facebook page.

William Westhoven is a local reporter for DailyRecord.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Email: [email protected]dailyrecord.com

State releases performance data on N.J. schools. See how your district fared.

New Jersey’s high school graduation rate slightly declined during the coronavirus pandemic, a drop that’s in line with other states, Assistant Commissioner Kathleen Ehling told the state Board of Education Wednesday. But full national results have not yet been reported, a common theme in assessing performance while schools were closed and many students lacked connectivity to attend classes and take tests on what they learned.The graduation data was included in the annual release of ...

New Jersey’s high school graduation rate slightly declined during the coronavirus pandemic, a drop that’s in line with other states, Assistant Commissioner Kathleen Ehling told the state Board of Education Wednesday. But full national results have not yet been reported, a common theme in assessing performance while schools were closed and many students lacked connectivity to attend classes and take tests on what they learned.

The graduation data was included in the annual release of School Performance Reports, which give parents a glimpse into their school’s test scores, violent incidents, and teacher experience levels, among other statistics.

Of the 26 states that have announced their 2021 graduation rates, 21 showed a decrease, Ehling said. While New Jersey ranked fourth in the nation in the 2018-19 school year, with a rate of 91%, the rate fell to 90.6% in 2021. Preliminary national 2020-21 figures show New Jersey moving to seventh place, using an adjusted federal graduation rate of 88.5. The federal graduation rate does not include some graduates of special education programs.

The new data reflects how hard it was to test students. It shows statistically significant drops in students taking the SAT and ACT college preparatory tests, though their scores improved slightly. Education experts say the drop in the number of test-takers could be due to many colleges making such tests optional and fewer opportunities to take the test. Nationally, the number of students taking the SAT fell 30% between 2020 and 2021, and the numbers taking the PSAT fell 51%, Ehling said.

For the first time, newly available data include the number of students enrolling in high school and college simultaneously and a breakdown by 15 demographic categories of how many students take Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate classes. The reports also include information on student apprenticeships, on students’ internet connectivity, and on teachers by subject area, race, years of experience, and education levels.

Elisabeth Yucis, associate director of professional development and instructional issues for the New Jersey Education Association, welcomed news in the reports of steady participation in Advanced Placement classes over the past years.

“We’ve been concerned about teacher shortages and teachers leaving the profession, and it would be a real shame if that caused students to miss out on AP classes,” she said.

Missing from this year’s reports are the New Jersey Student Learning Assessments, student growth data, and measures of progress towards English language proficiency, again due to the pandemic. The number of students taking one test for students with disabilities, Dynamic Learning Maps, dropped by 40%, because it could be administered only in person.

While the figures showed a rise in New Jersey students considered chronically absent, Ehling urged caution around reading too much into the statewide increase from 10.6 % in 2019-20 to 13.1 percent in 2020-21. Districts were allowed to set measures for how much contact a student needed with the school before being considered chronically absent.

She noted that a significant reduction in disciplinary incidents and bullying might be cheered in normal times but simply reflected the lack of real-life interactions among students.

Ehling said moving forward, it is essential to focus on social and emotional learning, and the whole child, through comprehensive mental health services, as described in a guide for all schools that she discussed Wednesday and in a recently created section of the Department of Education’s website.

“Moving out of pandemic, it will be years before we know its whole impact, but we’ve got to make investments now to support our students moving forward.”

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Tina Kelley may be reached at [email protected]. Katie Kausch can be reached at [email protected].

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