HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Columbia, NJ

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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Columbia, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Columbia, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Columbia, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Columbia, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Columbia, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Columbia, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Columbia, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Columbia, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Columbia, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Columbia, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Columbia, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Columbia, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Columbia, NJ

Illegal Campfire Possible Cause of Pine Barrens Wildfire: NJ Officials

An illegal campfire deep in the woods of the Pine Barrens is being investigated as the possible cause of the massive forest fire in New Jersey, officials said Tuesday.After three days battling the major wildfire in the Wharton State Forest, firefighters have made "substantial progress" in containing the flames, the New Jersey Forest Fire Service said.The wildfire has burned 13,500 acres of the state forest in Burlington County and a small part of Atlantic County. ...

An illegal campfire deep in the woods of the Pine Barrens is being investigated as the possible cause of the massive forest fire in New Jersey, officials said Tuesday.

After three days battling the major wildfire in the Wharton State Forest, firefighters have made "substantial progress" in containing the flames, the New Jersey Forest Fire Service said.

The wildfire has burned 13,500 acres of the state forest in Burlington County and a small part of Atlantic County. According to the state forest fire service, as of late Tuesday morning, the fire is 85% contained.

While officials said they are confident they can keep it from substantial spread, residents across South Jersey can expect to see smoke for the next week as firefighters continue to put out hotspots.

Photos: Massive NJ Wildfire is State's 2nd Largest Since 2007

Route 206 from Chew Road to Atsion Road and Route 542 from Green Bank Road to Columbia Road reopened late Tuesday morning. "Batsto Village, Atsion Recreation Area and all associated hiking and mountain bike trails remain closed to visitors," the forest fire service said.

The Atsion Recreation Area, Lower Forde Campground, Mullica River Campground, Mullica River Trail and boat launches along the Mullica River closed Monday due to the fire. Pinelands Adventures also suspended kayak and canoe trips.

The forest fire service said the blaze is the second largest forest fire in the Garden State since 2007.

By Tuesday morning, a layer of thick white smoke could be seen covering the air above the burning forest.

The fire, which was being fueled by dry and breezy conditions, began Sunday morning just after 6 a.m. in a remote section of the forest along the Mullica River in the Pine Barrens area. Monday morning, thick white smoke and flames could be seen as firefighters continued a backfiring operation to contain the blaze, which spanned areas of Washington, Shamong, Hammonton and Mullica townships.

"Fight fire with fire," is how New Jersey Forest Fire Service Chief Greg McLaughlin described the firefight early Monday afternoon.

Fire officials said during a press conference Tuesday that an illegal fire in the woods, a campfire, is under investigation as the possible cause of the far-spreading flames.

New Jersey's “General Forest Fire Act" requires that before having any fire within a forested area, citizens must contact the nearest forest fire service office to request a permit. They may also need a permit from the local fire official or NJ Division of Fire Safety.

McLaughlin said once the cause is officially determined, charges could be filed.

McLaughlin said he expected to fire to spread to 15,000 acres before being complete. He said it could be until Wednesday that the fire was finally contained, but it could happen earlier if rain occurs.

Eighteen structures were threatened by the flames, the forest fire service said Tuesday. No injuries have been reported though around 50 campers were evacuated.

The New Jersey Forest Fire Service defines a wildfire as an uncontrolled fire burning the different types of vegetation that cover the land. A wildfire is considered a “major wildfire” when it exceeds 100 acres in size.

Columbia High School Students Participate in 2022 Teen Arts Festival

From James Manno:After two years of consecutive virtual festivals, the New Jersey Teen Arts Festival (https://www.njteenarts.com/) returned in 2022 in person with vitality and fervor!On June 1st, 2022, thirty-one Columbia High School Visual Art students took advantage of the opportunity to attend the 2022 NJ Teen Arts Festival at Middlesex County College in Edison, New Jersey. Students were chaperoned by their art teachers Mr. Kirk Maynard (AP St...

From James Manno:

After two years of consecutive virtual festivals, the New Jersey Teen Arts Festival (https://www.njteenarts.com/) returned in 2022 in person with vitality and fervor!

On June 1st, 2022, thirty-one Columbia High School Visual Art students took advantage of the opportunity to attend the 2022 NJ Teen Arts Festival at Middlesex County College in Edison, New Jersey. Students were chaperoned by their art teachers Mr. Kirk Maynard (AP Studio Art) and Ms. Kandice Stewart (AP Art History and Art Honors), as well as Visual and Performing Arts Supervisor Mr. James A Manno.

During the two festival days, esteemed young artists, teachers and professional artists from around the state came to critique, as well as to teach workshops and master classes in their individual specialties, including drama, filmmaking, voice, acting, instrumental music and more. Columbia High School students seized the chance to participate in many of the workshops and classes provided.

Prior to the State Festival, at the county level, students in their home schools prepared and practiced their chosen art presentations for critiques and critical analysis, in one or two art disciplines. Students who excelled in their particular art form were selected to be sent to the state level competition. Only students who were invited to participate were adjudicated by state level judges.

During the State Festival, students who were invited received valuable feedback about their art in group and individual critiques, both written and verbal, and had the option to “sit-in” on the critiques of other emerging artists in their discipline, increasing their educational experience. Professional artists at the Festival provided in-depth critical reviews and analysis of student work, performances and group presentations, a process that all students reported to be most beneficial to their growth as artists.

10th Grade Art 3 Honors student, Samuel Taber-Kewene was nominated by the Essex County Teen Arts Program to exhibit his work “Untitled” at the festival for adjudication.

In addition to the critiques, workshops and master classes were provided to expose student artists to help students develop perceptual, intellectual and technical skills; gain cultural awareness and understanding; and develop personal aesthetic values.

List of participating students:

1. Abramson, Ella 2. Donachie, Bonney 3. Friedland, Daliah 4. Garcia, Susana 5. Offiah, Anthony 6. Perales-Buck, Sofia 7. Rojer, Ellie 8. Rojer, Sasha 9. Rosenthal, Lila 10. Smith-Cooper, Veronica 11. Uhl, Pilar Juliet 12. Zubieta, Imaan 13. Belisle, Evelyn 14. Dickson, Cameron 15. Heindl, Bridget 16. Holdbrook, Roselynn 17. Sylvester Jr, Andre 18. Taber-Kewene, Samuel 19. Abbas, Mariam 20. Agyare, Maxwell 21. Josius, Elisha 22. Doherty, Patrick 23. Spiesel, Berit 24. Aylward, Ruby 25. Haskins, Abby 26. Reiley, Cosgrove 27. Sockwell, Brooke 28. Shivers, Ruby 29. Knutsen, Susanna 30. Kemp, Aidan 31. Stein, Pablo

Another 14 Greg Schiano football targets, including 3 QBs and two 4-stars, will take their Rutgers official visits this week

Rutgers kicks off its second mass official visit this week on Wednesday, featuring 14 football new recruiting targets, after hosting 14 for a prior trip to Piscataway on June 10. ...

Rutgers kicks off its second mass official visit this week on Wednesday, featuring 14 football new recruiting targets, after hosting 14 for a prior trip to Piscataway on June 10. Greg Schiano earned pledges five pledges from that group and hopes to add more at the conclusion of this week’s fun. Find out which recruits will migrate to the Hale Center this week, and could help Rutgers win in the Big Ten.

Oluwatosin Babalade (6-5, 296) OL, DeMatha Catholic (Hyattsville, Md.): A four-star offensive lineman nicknamed “Big Tree,” Babalade boasts 24 offers, one of which came from Rutgers. He took prior official treks to Ohio State, South Carolina and UNC, but Rutgers gets the chance to leave the most lasting impression at the end.

Semaj Bridgeman (6-2, 230) LB, Imhotep Charter (Philadelphia, Pa.): A four-star recruit and one of the top defenders in the region, Bridgeman is in town and will venture to Rutgers, one of 32 schools to offer him, this week.

Shawn Boyle (6-2, 180) QB, Charlotte (N.C.) Catholic: Boyle has been committed to UNC-Charlotte since Nov. 24 of last year. But, one would think an offer from Rutgers could change things, being that it’s a Power Five school in, arguably, the first or second-best college football conference in the world. Meanwhile, UNC-Charlotte is a FBS team, but plays Group of Five ball.

Tucker McDonald (6-2, 195) QB, Wachusett Regional (Holden, Mass.): It’s clear to see why Sean Gleeson, by way of Schiano, offered McDonald over the weekend. Not only is he a quarterback, but he is the epitome of an athlete. McDonald leads his high school basketball as a point guard on the hardwood floor, much like he does as a QB on the gridiron. He is also a short stop on the baseball diamond, who runs a 4.68-second 40-yard dash, a 4.2-second shuttle, squats 335 pounds and boasts a 31-inch vertical leap.

Chandler Galban (6-2, 200) QB, Fullerton (Ca.) College: This junior college gunslinger has good size, Power Five tools, and will add contrast to Rutgers’ high school quarterbacks on campus this week.

Nnamdi Udeogu (6-5, 230) Edge, Georgetown Prep (Rockville, Md.): Coming off an official visit to Vanderbilt on June 10, this long, athletic edge has a chance to play alongside Prep alum Kyonte Hamilton if he picks Rutgers.

R.J. Johnson (6-2, 180) DB, Eagles Landing Christian Academy (McDonough, Ga.): Johnson has 28 offers, including Rutgers, LSU, Ole Miss, Arkansas, Florida, Boston College, Indiana, Duke and plenty other Power Five and Group of Five schools.

Joe Jackson (5-11, 185) RB, Ridge Community (Davenport, Fla.): Jackson, who has 27 offers, visited Duke on June 17, and will be at Rutgers on Wednesday, as his recruitment winds down.

Bo Mascoe (5-11, 170) DB, Osceola (Kissimmee, Fla.): Mascoe boasts seven offers, including Power Five schools Rutgers, Boston College, and Iowa and Iowa State. Rutgers seems positioned well here.

Vilay Nakkoun (5-11, 175) DB, Orlando (Fla.) Christian Prep: Rutgers added the ninth player to its 2023 class whenNakkoun, one of Central Florida’s most underrated gems, committed to Schiano over the telephone last Wednesday. Rutgers offered Nakkoun on May 5 and stayed in touch with him and his family ever since, culminating in his pledge.

Dylan Wade (6-4, 240) TE, Jones (Orlando, Fla.): Wade visited Rutgers toward the end of March and will make a return trip from Orlando this week. He will also (officially) visit Purdue on June 24 and visited Maryland on June 17.

Famah Toure (6-3, 200) WR, Irvington (N.J.): Schiano set the tone for Toure’s Rutgers homecoming during a phone call a couple weeks back.

“He just wants me to make the right decision and play where I’m loved, where there’s family,” Toure said of Rutgers’ head man, who knows Rutgers has one tie that no other school has – Famah’s brother and junior Rutgers Edge, Mohamed Toure. Famah visited Illinois on June 17 and will bring his entire family to local Rutgers on Wednesday.

Sean Williams (6-1, 175) WR, St. John’s College (Washington, D.C.): Williams will take his Rutgers official visit this week and one to Wake Forest afterwards, on June 24.

Braeden Wisloski (5-11, 185) WR, Southern Columbia Area (Catawissa, Pa.): Wisloski, Pennsylvania’s 100-meter state champ (10.74), was offered by Schiano during a visit to campus on April 7.

MORE FROM TODDERICK HUNT

Meet the 2021 NJ.com All-College Football team, featuring top players across the country who come from New Jersey

Presenting the NJ.com Top 50, Jan. 2022, a list of New Jersey’s top high school football recruits (regardless of grade)

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The Future Shines Bright for Columbia Middle School Class of 2022

BERKELEY HEIGHTS, NJ - The Columbia Middle School Class of 2022 walked onto Gov. Livingston High School's Frye Field on Monday to celebrate their promotion to high school.The common message was about perseverance and navigating through difficulties that were out of their control. The Class of 2022 experience while at Columbia Middle School was like no other with the COVID-19 lockdown, remote and hybrid learning, masking, and quarantine.Interim Principal Stephen Hopkins told the class that you have choices of how to react to sit...

BERKELEY HEIGHTS, NJ - The Columbia Middle School Class of 2022 walked onto Gov. Livingston High School's Frye Field on Monday to celebrate their promotion to high school.

The common message was about perseverance and navigating through difficulties that were out of their control. The Class of 2022 experience while at Columbia Middle School was like no other with the COVID-19 lockdown, remote and hybrid learning, masking, and quarantine.

Interim Principal Stephen Hopkins told the class that you have choices of how to react to situations that are out of your control. "The universe can reach out, change your entire life. -- Just because that powerlessness can be terrifying, it can even paralyze you. -- You already know this, you've learned this lesson, you've experienced it out of nowhere -- events out of your control. -- All of it uprooted your entire lives. Why you? --- You are powerless in the way the universe will act upon you. We all are. Your education was disrupted by a global pandemic. So was everyone else's. The real question you need to answer moving forward is what are you going to do about it? Even in the face of the most overwhelming events that life will throw at you, you never ever are powerless in the way you react. How you choose to live is truly your choice -- fear, despair, and listlessness are the easy way out, but they lead to nowhere," he said.

Dr. Melisa Varley also addressed the adversity the Class of 2022 faced since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. She acknowledged and thanked "the Board of Education for their dedication and support, the administration for their hard work and endurance, the staff for their commitment to delivering quality instruction in the face of incredible challenges, your parents for their cooperation and patience, and most of all, you, the Columbia Middle School Class of 2022, for your resilience in the face of adversity. The pandemic has presented you with many challenges -- remote learning, hybrid learning, and the isolation of quarantine. But each of these challenges presented you with an opportunity to learn, you are more independent, technologically adept, and adaptable."

In addition to the aforementioned challenges, Varley said the class also experienced leadership from two principals - Frank Geiger, who retired midyear, and Steve Hopkins, as the interim principal. She took the opportunity to introduce the incoming principal Paul Kobliska, who was in attendance.

"Eighth graders, you have learned at a much younger age than most that life can throw you curveballs -- all of these lessons will help you meet the challenges of high school next year," said Varley.

Hannah Chen, class representative, gave the student welcome address and acknowledged how Columbia Middle School had pushed and prepared her for the next step -- high school. "Although it is hard to believe my middle school years have come to an end, the memories from the past three years will always have a special place in my heart. Leaving CMS and going off to high school will be tough. But I wish all my peers good luck -- whether they're going to GL, magnet, or another school," she said.

Rayna Hazarika, class representative, gave the class address. She described her experience through Columbia Middle School as searching for the ray of sunshine. She described sixth grade with the sun slowly and steadily rising to the sky as she navigated her way through the school. "But suddenly, clouds and rain came and covered up the sun," describing the learning experience and remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. "But thankfully, both sun and rain created some unexpected rainbows." She quoted a song by Passenger, "You only miss the sun when it starts to snow," she said. "I truly believe that this describes my eighth grade year, which was my favorite year at Columbia Middle School. I did not realize how much I would miss this until it's almost over. As my sun was starting to set, certain moments made it shine exceptionally bright," she said. "Even walking into classes such as French, English, and Social Studies lit up my day. Clouds and rain were not unheard of during this year, but the rainbows that came out of all those moments made it worth it. Columbia Middle School was filled with rays of sunshine -- made even the rainy days fun."

Board of Education President Michael D'Aquila gave words of advice, "be flexible, try new things, bounce back when things get you down, be proud of your accomplishments -- most of all, believe in yourself, and you'll have nothing to fear. You're off to great places."

After the awarding of the diplomas, Gov. Livingston Assistant Principal Tara Oliveira welcomed the graduates to Gov. Livingston High School and looks forward to seeing the class up on "The Hill" in September.

The students marched off the field for photos and lasting memories they will cherish as they move forward onto their next chapter as the sun will continue to rise and shine bright on this class.

Music was provided by the Columbia Middle School Orchestra.

Editor's note: Email [email protected] Columbia Middle School graduation pictures to be included in photo gallery.

Why New Jersey won’t let you pump gas yourself

No matter the price of gasoline, there are two states in which self-service gas pumping remains illegal.Both New Jersey and Oregon prohibit residents from pumping their own gas largely as a public safety matter — or at least that’s what state legislators say about the matter.The finer details, however, are worth reviewing.If you’ve ever wondered why the two states are anti-self-service, here’s a quick look at the legal codes that ban gas stations from letting people pump their own gas.Here&...

No matter the price of gasoline, there are two states in which self-service gas pumping remains illegal.

Both New Jersey and Oregon prohibit residents from pumping their own gas largely as a public safety matter — or at least that’s what state legislators say about the matter.

The finer details, however, are worth reviewing.

If you’ve ever wondered why the two states are anti-self-service, here’s a quick look at the legal codes that ban gas stations from letting people pump their own gas.

Here’s the reasoning behind the decision as well.

NJ’s self-service gas prohibition goes back to 1949

The Garden State passed the Retail Gasoline Dispensing Safety Act in 1949 — which is still in effect to this day.

As of publication date right now, New Jersey’s legislature has published 10 findings and declarations that detail why people aren’t allowed to pump gas themselves.

Fire hazards: The legislature says that “it is in the public interest” for gas operators to pump fuel because they can “ensure compliance with appropriate safety procedures, including turning off vehicle engines and refraining from smoking while fuel is dispensed.”

Helps cashiers: The legislature says gas station cashiers can’t “maintain a clear view” of self-service customers while they’re handling in-store transactions, which makes it “far more difficult to enforce compliance with safety procedures.”

Ensures compliance: The legislature reiterates that the state “needs” a self-service gas ban, so gas station attendants can ensure safety procedures are followed.

Insurance is a factor: The N.J. legislature says self-service gas stations have “higher general liability insurance premium rates” because there’s increased risk when people leave their vehicles to pump gas — which could include exposure to flammable liquids, crime, falls or personal injury.

Gas fumes: The legislature says gas fumes pose a “health hazard,” especially for pregnant women. There is no mention of health hazards for gas station attendants.

Levels out the cost of full-service: The legislature says a statewide self-service gas ban prohibits full-service gas stations from charging “significantly higher prices” when competing with self-service gas stations.

This, in turn, helps “low income individuals” avoid having to “undergo the inconvenience and hazards of dispensing their own gasoline” — which the legislature says could be viewed as discrimination if there was no ban in place.

Vehicle repairs: The legislature says self-service stations have “contributed to the diminished availability of repair facilities and maintenance services at gasoline stations.”

Maintenance checks: The legislature says customers are less likely to have or conduct “needed maintenance checks” because there’s usually a higher price associated with full service (outside of New Jersey). Gas attendants in the state can conduct these checks, which the legislature says helps customers avoid vehicle neglect, road dangers and costly repairs associated with “deferred maintenance.”

No cost disparity observed: The legislature says its self-service gas ban “does not constitute a restraint of trade” because it hasn’t found “conclusive evidence that self-service gasoline provides a sustained reduction in gasoline prices.”

Public welfare: The legislature says self-service gas prohibition promotes “common welfare” because it provides “increased safety and convenience without causing economic harm to the public in general.”

The full Retail Gasoline Dispensing Safety Act and Regulations can be found on the state’s Department of Labor and Workforce Development webpage.

Oregon’s self-service gas ban goes back to 1951, but …

The Beaver State imposed a self-service gas ban two years after New Jersey did so.

However, the statewide ban in Oregon was eased in 2018 with House Bill 2482, which allows self-service gas pumping in counties that have fewer than 40,000 residents.

Many of the counties that allow self-service gas stations are in rural areas that are located in the eastern part of the state.

Oregon Self-Service & Provisions Map: Self-serve gas laws by county

Where self-service gas is prohibited: Columbia, Washington, Multnomah, Yamhill, Clackamas, Polk, Marion, Lincoln, Benton, Linn, Lane, Deschutes, Coos, Douglas, Josephine, Jackson, Klamath and Umatilla

Where self-service gas is allowed: Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam, Morrow, Jefferson, Wheeler, Crook, Lake, Grant, Harney, Union, Wallowa, Baker and Malheur

Where self-service gas is allowed from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m.: Clatsop, Tillamook and Curry

There was a time during the COVID-19 pandemic when self-service gas rules were changed statewide for health and safety reasons. Yet that temporary gas attendant suspension expired on May 23, 2020, according to the Office of the State Fire Marshall.

Once the suspension expired, the state reverted to full-service gas station operations in counties where self-service gas pumping is “prohibited at all times.”

Oregon’s Office of the State Fire Marshall says gasoline is considered a “Class 1 flammable liquid” — meaning it has a flash point that’s below 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

For this reason, the state prohibits self-service gas pumping “in high population counties” and requires only gas station “owners, operators, and their employees…to use or manipulate any pump, hose, pipe or other device used at the facility to dispense Class 1 flammable liquids into a fuel tank of a motor vehicle or container.”

Gas stations are also required to have attendants who can “provide equal access to fuel” in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Office of the State Fire Marshall states.

The office handles “complaints about compliance” with self-service gas rules.

Gas station attendant and fuel station stats

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics says there were 18,780 service station attendants working at gas stations throughout the country in 2021.

In terms of pay, the government agency found that service station attendants had a median hourly pay of $13.67 and a median annual salary of $28,430.

The American Petroleum Institute reports that there are more than 145,000 fueling stations in the US, according to data shared by the National Association of Convenience Stores (NACS).

An updated industry report from the NACS states that approximately 116,641 of these fueling stations are equipped with convenience stores, which reportedly make 80% of motor fuel sales in the country.

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