HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Crandon Lakes, NJ

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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Crandon Lakes, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Crandon Lakes, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Crandon Lakes, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Crandon Lakes, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Crandon Lakes, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Crandon Lakes, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

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Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

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What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Crandon Lakes, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Crandon Lakes, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Crandon Lakes, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Crandon Lakes, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Crandon Lakes, NJ

Swartswood Lake under 'watch’ after harmful algae is confirmed

[email protected] — A year after Swartswood Lake was inundated with a harmful algal bloom that temporarily shut down the popular locale before the start of summer, the lake is again experiencing dangerous bacteria.While several state parks have reopened for swimming following the coronavirus outbreak, including Hopatcong State Park, swimming from the state’s third largest freshwater lake has remained closed indefinitely. The park has reopened for fishing, canoeing/kayaking, camping and hik...

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HAMPTON — A year after Swartswood Lake was inundated with a harmful algal bloom that temporarily shut down the popular locale before the start of summer, the lake is again experiencing dangerous bacteria.

While several state parks have reopened for swimming following the coronavirus outbreak, including Hopatcong State Park, swimming from the state’s third largest freshwater lake has remained closed indefinitely. The park has reopened for fishing, canoeing/kayaking, camping and hiking.

Residents are warned to not drink the water or eat fish caught in the lake. Canoeists or kayakers are urged to take caution and pets and livestock should be kept away from the water, according to information from the state’s Department of Environmental Protection, or DEP.

Data collected and later posted on July 23 from the main beach area and from a boat launch area of Camp Lou Henry Hoover, a Girl Scout residential camp site, showed heightened levels of a cyanobacteria that causes blue-green algal blooms. The Girl Scout summer camp is not operating due to the coronavirus, according to the Girl Scouts’ website.

To be considered safe, a water sample must contain less than 20,000 cyanobacteria cells per milliliter, the state’s DEP indicates. Toxins from the main beach contained 25,800 per milliliter and those from Camp Hoover contained 34,250 per milliliter — numbers that fall within the DEP’s guidelines to issue a “watch” notice for the lake.

While cell counts of 80,000 per milliliter or more are required to shut down a beach area for swimming, a “watch” still leaves the potential for residents to suffer allergenic or health effects from the water.

A skin rash, the mildest symptom, can occur from direct skin contact with the bacteria, but cyanobacteria produces “extremely dangerous toxins,” and ingestion, according to the environmental agency, can “sicken or kill” animals or people. If exposed to the toxin, skin should be immediately rinsed off with clean water as soon as possible.

If ingested, the toxins can cause the following symptoms in humans: abdominal pain, headache, sore throat, vomiting, nausea, dry cough, diarrhea, blistering around the mouth and pneumonia. If any symptoms appears after exposure to the lake, seek medical attention.

Pets, livestock or wildlife, if exposed, can experience lethargy, stumbling, loss of appetite or falling.

In the DEP’s color-coded warning system, a new feature this year, an interactive map shows harmful algal blooms have caused the closure of portions of seven lakes or ponds statewide so far this summer — but none are public beach areas.

While a “watch” is in place for several spots along the West Milford portion of Greenwood Lake, Browns Point, a small park area, was placed under an “advisory” on July 6. The advisory indicates that cyanobacteria cells per milliliter are above 100,000, with a moderate risk of health effects just from touching the water.

The harmful bacteria shut down Greenwood Lake for most of the season last year and marred the July 4 holiday for boaters and swimmers of the state’s largest freshwater lake in Hopatcong in 2019. The lake closed for nearly two months.

Several spots have been tested for the blooms along Lake Hopatcong, the latest on July 16, but there have been no confirmed HABs, the DEP’s map shows. Spots along Crandon Lakes, which straddles Hampton and Stillwater, also tested negative.

The state experienced 39 algal blooms in 2019, according to the DEP.

The algae usually blooms during the summer season when water temperatures are warmer than usual, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Algal blooms absorb sunlight, which makes water even warmer and promotes more blooms, the agency states.

The Swartswood Lake swimming area is typically open annually between Memorial Day and Labor Day but was closed indefinitely due to the coronavirus. Residents can still hike, bike, picnic and camp, among other activities, within Swartswood State Park.

It was not immediately known if Swartswood Lake would reopen this summer. Additional information from the DEP was not immediately returned.

For those seeking to cool off from the warm weather, there are several state parks that have since reopened for swimming including High Point, Wawayanda and Hopatcong.

For more information about swim sites that are open and closed, visit: https://www.state.nj.us/dep/parksandforests/parks/swimming_schedule.html.

Lori Comstock can also be reached on Twitter: @LoriComstockNJH, on Facebook:www.Facebook.com/LoriComstockNJH or by phone: 973-383-1194.

West Matheson Park reopens but so does a long-running neighborhood conflict

The reopening of parks is reopening old wounds at West Matheson Hammock Park, a wild green haven adored by nature and dog lovers alike.The 70-acre open space, located across Old Cutler Road from the better-known bayside section of Matheson Hammock Park, was closed along with all other parks by Miami-Dade County in mid-March to stem the spread of coronavirus. It finally ...

The reopening of parks is reopening old wounds at West Matheson Hammock Park, a wild green haven adored by nature and dog lovers alike.

The 70-acre open space, located across Old Cutler Road from the better-known bayside section of Matheson Hammock Park, was closed along with all other parks by Miami-Dade County in mid-March to stem the spread of coronavirus. It finally reopened Monday, with attendants handing out a list of Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s New Normal plan rules: Wear face masks, practice social distancing, no groups of 10 or more and keep all dogs on leashes,

West Matheson Park visitors are still mystified as to why it took so long to reopen while Hammock Lakes Homeowners Association members are miffed that the entrance to the park in their neighborhood reopened at all.

A years-long dispute over access to West Matheson and its future recurred as pandemic restrictions loosened. The homeowners association, which represents residents in the affluent Coral Gables enclave of large houses on lush lots, lobbied the county for the north gate on School House Road to stay locked. Frustrated park devotees, including dog owners who consider roomy West Matheson to be a paradise for their pets, lobbied the county for the park to reopen when Gimenez announced an April 29 reopening of most parks — such as the more popular and more crowded east portion of Matheson — but kept the west side off limits to people and pets.

“If you’re opening parks and enforcing social distancing, why can’t people bring their dogs on a leash? West Matheson is the ideal place for social distancing, so to keep it closed made no sense,” said Douglas Fernandez, who has been bringing his Labrador retrievers to the park for years. “If you ask me, it’s because of the influence of the wealthy Hammock Lakes HOA. We feel they want a private park. Their intent is to permanently privatize a public road into a public park. They used the pandemic to revive their effort to control access.”

Not true, said homeowners association president Bill Ogden, who objects to the number of cars passing through the neighborhood on their way in and out of the park, not to users of the park, whether they be human or canine, and not to pedestrians walking through his neighborhood to the park. He wants a new main entrance to the park to be designated on Old Cutler Road, where there’s a parking lot.

“This would be an opportune time for you to consider keeping the gate into the park at School House Road closed to private vehicles after the pandemic,” Ogden wrote to County Commissioner Xavier Suarez on April 15. “We implore you to allow the parks department to continue to keep the School House entrance closed to vehicular traffic going forward.”

All dogs are supposed to be on a leash in Miami-Dade County, in accordance with ordinance 58-28. But West Matheson is known as an unofficial, unfenced dog park where dogs can ramble and run. A group of regulars say they are responsible owners whose dogs are socialized to safely play with other dogs and not bother people.

But not everybody is in favor of the freedom afforded by West Matheson, a Protected Natural Area under the county’s Environmentally Endangered Lands Program. In 1930, William J. Matheson and son Hugh donated the tract of tropical hardwood hammock forest to the county for its first public park.

Some of the 125 surrounding homeowners are disturbed by swelling traffic on weekends and unregulated dog activity, and want to reduce car access and parking inside the park. Visitors can drive in from Kendall Drive on School House Road, pass through the Hammock Lakes guardhouse gate where license plates are recorded, enter through an open metal gate and park on the grass. Or they can park in the gravel lot on Old Cutler Road directly across from the north entrance to Fairchild Tropical Garden and walk 500 yards in on the nature trail (which is too rough for wheelchair or disabled users and prone to puddles during rainy season). Or they can walk in from Banyan Road on another rocky trail lined with royal palm trees.

A guardhouse with a gate was installed at the Kendall Drive entry to the neighborhood in 2014; homeowners paid for it through special taxing district assessments. There’s also a pedestrian entrance via Kendall Drive.

While the security guard in the guardhouse cannot prohibit the public from entering, park users complain that the setup is an uninviting deterrent to access.

“The HOA’s desire to eliminate access altogether, via Kendall Drive or Old Cutler Road, is akin to buying a house next to a railroad track then asking them to stop running trains,” said loyal park visitor Jay Caplin. “It is not only unfair but inequitable to limit or close access in order to appease a minimal constituency vs. the broader public that frequents this gem.”

What’s unfair, counters Ogden, is portraying him and his neighbors as selfish rich people who want to bar outsiders.

“I’m tired of hearing that we are McMansion owners who don’t want anyone in the park that was here long before we built our houses, tired of hearing that it’s like moving next to an airport and expecting planes to stop flying, tired of claims that we’re making a land grab, tired of being castigated,” Ogden said. “We are really nice people. We know the park is not private property. We have no issue with people and their dogs using the park. We have issues with traffic, cars and free-for-all parking in there. It’s like a tailgate party on weekends.”

Ogden asked guards to count how many park users come through and it’s up to as many as 200 on peak days, which he says adds up to 400 trips through the neighborhood, “and I have an extremely accurate count,” he said.

Park regulars disagree with that figure.

“Most of the traffic is residents, landscaping trucks, construction trucks, telecommunications trucks, nannies, kids going to and from school,” Fernandez said. “The maximum number of cars I’ve ever seen in the park is 25 on a Sunday. There’s no constant flow of traffic to the park, no speeding, no partying. There are only 12 houses lining School House Road.

“Every few years the homeowners take another stab at closing the neighborhood. It keeps coming back, like Pokemon. We want the park to be more accessible, not less.”

Ogden said the gate-arm entry to the park used to be closed to all but maintenance vehicles until Gimenez ordered it to stay open in 2009.

“To say they have the right to use a maintenance gate is ludicrous,” Ogden said. “It was never approved for that use. Why such a sense of entitlement by them?”

A master plan proposal by the county would permanently close the gate to cars, build a fenced dog run for off-leash dogs, add walking and biking trails, pave the parking lot on Old Cutler Road and improve the wooded walkway into the park from that lot.

“It’s a gorgeous plan,” Ogden said. “Right now it’s not entirely compatible to run or bike through there because you might get chased or knocked down or intimidated by a dog.”

At least improve the parking lot and walkway so that people with disabilities can use it, he said. Instead, the county has had to focus on the $55 million sea rise-mitigation plan for the east side of Matheson, which was flooded and damaged by Hurricane Irma in 2017. Many repairs still haven’t been made despite lots of complaints, and there is much heavier use of the revenue-producing east side, which has a marina, beach, restaurant and a mangrove walking trail that is frequently under water.

“Why put the traffic burden on us? West Matheson is a regional park that should be accessible by arterial road, not via a residential neighborhood,” Ogden said. “The county should commit funds to fix that parking lot and walkway so that everyone — not just dog owners who drive in — can have access. We’ve been given assurances that this would be addressed since 1995. The county has failed miserably, reneged on plans for park improvements and stabbed me and our community in the back.”

Suarez, who met with both homeowners and park regulars, said the strapped parks department has to decide on priorities that are most beneficial to the most users. Maria Nardi, county parks director, has said sea-level rise at iconic parks such as Crandon Park, Haulover Beach and the Deering Estate is the agency’s central and most pressing challenge.

West Matheson devotee and golden retriever owner Julie Roth Paikowsky is relieved that she can finally return to pet paradise.

“This park is perfect for social distancing and it is never crowded,” she said. “It’s a natural wonderland, a great hidden beauty of our community that has been missed by people of all ages. As a Miami native I’ve enjoyed this park for decades. It would be a great loss if anything changed.”

After a series of mixed messages from the parks department about whether dogs would be allowed in West Matheson upon its reopening, Fernandez is pleased that things are back to normal — or new normal. But he and his park friends still dread the day that access gets diminished or real estate developers find a way to move in.

“We have to protect this special place. If we hadn’t kicked and screamed it would still be closed,” said Fernandez, who brings his two labs, Finn and Charlie, to the park, where they also have friends. “I want to make sure for my daughter and granddaughter that Matheson continues to exist. Parks are for the people.”

Snow squall warnings issued in 13 N.J. counties

The National Weather Service issued rare snow squall warnings for 13 counties in northern and central New Jersey Wednesday afternoon, because heavy snow showers have been popping up in the region as an arctic front moves through, making driving conditions dangerous.The first warning was issued at 1:30 p.m. for all of Sussex County and the north-central area of Warren County, and remained in effect until 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. It also included Monroe County and ce...

The National Weather Service issued rare snow squall warnings for 13 counties in northern and central New Jersey Wednesday afternoon, because heavy snow showers have been popping up in the region as an arctic front moves through, making driving conditions dangerous.

The first warning was issued at 1:30 p.m. for all of Sussex County and the north-central area of Warren County, and remained in effect until 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. It also included Monroe County and central Carbon County in northeastern Pennsylvania.

Drivers should be aware of white-out conditions occurring quickly, the weather service said, advising motorists to slow down and turn on their headlights.

UPDATE (2:35 p.m.): Another snow squall warning was issued at 2:23 p.m., covering all of Sussex County, all of Warren County and the northwestern region of Morris County. This is effective until 3:30 p.m. and also includes Carbon County, Monroe County, north-central Lehigh County and northern Northampton County in Pennsylvania.

UPDATE (3:05 p.m.): A third snow squall warning was issued at 3 p.m. for Morris County, northeastern Somerset County, north-central Monmouth County and northeastern Middlesex County, effective until 3:45 p.m. This warning area includes the Garden State Parkway between mile markers 116 and 134, Interstate 287 between mile markers 0 and 14, and between mile markers 22 and 54, Interstate 78 between mile markers 32 and 42, Interstate 80 between mile markers 28 and 48, and the New Jersey Turnpike between exits 10 in Edison and 13 in Elizabeth.

UPDATE (3:30 p.m.): Another snow squall warning was issued at 3:18 p.m. for Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Union and eastern Passaic counties, effective until 4:15 p.m. Wednesday.

UPDATE (4:05 p.m.): A new snow squall warning was issued at 4 p.m. for Essex, Hudson and Union counties, along with New York City, effective until 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. The weather service’s New York regional office is warning drivers they could face “brief zero visibility in heavy snow and blowing snow,” along with wind gusts up to 40 mph. Snow could quickly accumulate about a half-inch to 1 inch in these areas.

UPDATE (4:15 p.m.): A new snow squall warning was issued at 4:10 p.m. for Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Morris, Somerset and Warren counties in New Jersey, along with Bucks County in Pennsylvania, effective until 4:45 p.m.

UPDATE (4:45 p.m.): The National Weather Service said an area of heavy snow will be moving through parts of Burlington, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Somerset and Warren counties now through 5:45 p.m. Driving conditions can rapidly deteriorate.

Snow squalls are intense bursts of heavy snow that move quickly and often drop a fast coating of snow on the ground, creating slick driving conditions. They also tend to bring strong winds, which blow the snow sideways, sharply reducing visibility for drivers.

Many snow squalls are short-lived, sometimes dissipating after 10 or 15 minutes, but some can last as long as an hour or even longer.

In addition to the threat of snow squalls on Wednesday, some light scattered snow showers are possible in northern and central New Jersey during the afternoon and evening, the National Weather Service said. No accumulation is expected from the snow showers, but the snow squalls could drop a quick inch of snow.

New Jersey will experience a big cool-down Wednesday night after the arctic front sweeps through, with temperatures dropping into the teens and low 20s by Thursday morning. The mercury might not climb above the freezing mark of 32 degrees all day on Thursday, setting the stage for another frigid morning on Friday.

The second squall warning says “a dangerous snow squall was located along a line extending from High Point to near Crandon Lakes to near Long Pond to near Blakeslee to near Drums, moving south at 25 mph.”

Drivers in those areas can expect to face poor visibility in heavy snow and blowing snow, and wind gusts up to 30 mph, the weather service said in its warning, noting there’s a risk of “dangerous life-threatening travel.”

The warning area includes the following highways: Interstate 80 in New Jersey between mile markers 0 and 28; Interstate 80 in Pennsylvania between mile markers 278 and 314; Northeast Extension between exits A74 and A95; Interstate 380 in Pennsylvania between mile markers 0 and 13.

The squalls that moved through northern New Jersey Wednesday afternoon dropped a quick 1.3 inches of snow in the Randolph area of Morris County, according to the National Weather Service.

The Highland Lakes area of Sussex County was coasted with 0.6 inches of snow and the Mount Pocono area of northeastern Pennsylvania received a fast 1.2 inches of snow.

Safety tips for drivers

Live weather radar

Len Melisurgo may be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @LensReality or like him on Facebook. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

Iron ore mine plans on hold in northern Wisconsin

The company looking to build a $1.5 billion iron ore mine in northern Wisconsin has stopped the project until state lawmakers agree on a new set of rules for reviewing such projects.State Sen. Robert Jauch, D-Poplar, said this week that Gogebic Taconite is turning its attention toward sites in Michigan and Minnesota after a bid to push through new legislation failed recently."I hear they would come back if there was a law in place," Jauch said. "I have told the company to shoot for getting a new bill in the fall ...

The company looking to build a $1.5 billion iron ore mine in northern Wisconsin has stopped the project until state lawmakers agree on a new set of rules for reviewing such projects.

State Sen. Robert Jauch, D-Poplar, said this week that Gogebic Taconite is turning its attention toward sites in Michigan and Minnesota after a bid to push through new legislation failed recently.

"I hear they would come back if there was a law in place," Jauch said. "I have told the company to shoot for getting a new bill in the fall session, which would give the public a full discussion on this issue."

J. Matthew Fifield, Gogebic's managing director, did not immediately return calls Wednesday, but according to the Associated Press, company officials have confirmed the project is on hold.

Gogebic proposed building the mine in Ashland and Iron counties in the Penokee Range, the headwaters of the Bad River, which flows into Lake Superior. A study commissioned by the company showed the open pit iron mine would support 2,834 jobs in a 12-county region of northern Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula and have a total economic impact of $604 million a year.

Gogebic wants to speed up the state review process, which it feels is onerous and costly.

Officials with the Department of Natural Resources have said the amount of time required to obtain a mining permit depends on a project's complexity. The shortest time, officials said, is about three and a half years.

A permit application by Crandon Mining to build a zinc and copper mine in northern Wisconsin, however, was under consideration for 10 years, costing the company some $70 million, before Crandon dropped its request.

Under a proposal pushed by Gogebic, which never made it to the full Legislature, the Department of Natural Resources would have had to make a decision within 300 days of receiving a company's application. That would not count the time needed to consider exploratory permits and other preparatory work.

"They tried to push that bill through as quick as they could," Jauch said. "That was the wrong way to go about it, and I told them that. It obviously bothered a lot of people."

Assembly Speaker Jeff Fitzgerald, R-Horicon, said the mining bill is "not dead by any means."

"We think it's a great jobs bill," he said. "It's going to create a lot of good, high-paying jobs especially in that northern part of the state that has really been hurt with this economy."

Fitzgerald said that with the Senate fully engaged with recalls, the Legislature will likely wait until the fall to take the measure up.

State Journal reporter Mary Spicuzza and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

N.J. weather: Strong thunderstorms are lashing the region; flash flood warnings issued, thousands of power outages reported

Strong thunderstorms have started to fire up in eastern Pennsylvania, and many cells are moving across New Jersey Wednesday afternoon, prompting the National Weather Service to issue a series of severe thunderstorm warnings along with flash flood warnings because of heavy downpours.More than 34,000 homes and businesses across the Garden State have lost power as of 4:30 p.m., according to ...

Strong thunderstorms have started to fire up in eastern Pennsylvania, and many cells are moving across New Jersey Wednesday afternoon, prompting the National Weather Service to issue a series of severe thunderstorm warnings along with flash flood warnings because of heavy downpours.

More than 34,000 homes and businesses across the Garden State have lost power as of 4:30 p.m., according to power outage reports from the major utility companies. Most of the outages are in Ocean, Monmouth and Hunterdon counties -- areas that have been hit hard by today’s storms.

The stormy weather has also sparked flight delays at Newark Liberty International Airport. As of 4:30 p.m., Newark was reporting departure delays of 45 to 60 minutes, while inbound flights were being delayed at their points of origin for about 4 hours, according to the FlightAware website, which tracks flight delays across the nation.

Almost 3 inches of rain was reported in Toms River this afternoon, and wind gusts of 60 mph were reported in Beach Haven, 51 mph at Trenton-Mercer Airport in Ewing, 50 mph in Mystic Island, 47 mph in Ocean Gate and 41 mph in Lyndhurst.

The National Weather Service has received reports of widespread street flooding in Monmouth County, with many roads closed in Middletown, a vehicle under water in Colts Neck and a driver stranded in flood waters in Eatontown. Flooding has also forced the closure of roads in Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright.

A house fire was reported in the Far Hills area of Somerset County as thunderstorms were pounding the area, but it was not immediately known if lightning sparked the blaze.

Thunderstorm warnings

The first of several severe thunderstorm warnings of the day was issued at 1:30 p.m. for Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Mercer counties and remained in effect until 2:15 p.m. The weather service said a storm cell that was moving across those areas of the state was packing wind gusts of 60 mph and small hail. (See updates below)

Update (5:55 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Atlantic, Burlington and Ocean counties, effective until 6:30 p.m.

Update (5:45 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Sussex County, effective until 6:30 p.m.

Update (5:30 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Atlantic, Burlington, Cumberland, Ocean and Salem counties, effective until 6:15 p.m.

Update (5 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Morris, Sussex and Warren counties, effective until 5:30 p.m.

Update (4 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Morris and Somerset counties, effective until 4:15 p.m.

Update (3:55 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for northwestern Union County and west-central Essex County, effective until 4:45 p.m. Watch out for winds as strong as 60 mph and quarter-size hail.

Update (3:50 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Burlington, Camden, Mercer and Monmouth counties, effective until 4:30 p.m.

Update (3:25 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Hunterdon, Mercer and Somerset counties, effective until 4:15 p.m.

Update (3:05 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Hudson County, southeastern Bergen County and New York City, effective until 3:30 p.m. In addition, a severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for Hunterdon and Mercer counties, active through 3:30 p.m.

Update (2:50 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for northern Monmouth County, effective until 3:45 p.m. (expired at 3:10 p.m.)

Update (2:25 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for parts of Monmouth and Ocean counties, effective until 3:15 p.m.

Update (2:15 p.m.): A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for parts of Burlington, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and Somerset counties, effective until 3 p.m. Wednesday. Watch out for wind gusts as strong as 60 mph and quarter-size hail.

Flood warnings and advisories

A flash flood warning has been issued for northwestern Burlington County in New Jersey, as well as Bucks, Delaware and Philadelphia counties in Pennsylvania, effective now through 4:15 p.m. In addition, a flash flood warning has been activated for north-central Burlington County, southern Mercer County and southeastern Bucks County, remaining in effect through 4:45 p.m.

Weather radar shows that up to 1 inch of rain has already fallen in those areas, and flash flooding is expected to start shortly.

Update (5:40 p.m.): A flood advisory has been issued for Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Ocean and Salem counties, effective until 8:45 p.m.

Update (5:20 p.m.): A flash flood warning has been issued for Hudson County, eastern Union County and southeastern Essex County, along with Staten Island, N.Y., effective until 6:45 p.m.

Update (5 p.m.): A flash flood warning has been issued for Sussex and Warren counties, effective until 9 p.m.

Update (4:10 p.m.): The flash flood warning for Burlington, Bucks, Delaware and Philadelphia counties has been extended to 6:15 p.m., instead of 4:15 p.m.

Update (3:50 p.m.): A flash flood warning has been issued for Ocean County, effective until 7:45 p.m.

Update (3:40 p.m.): A flood advisory has been issued for Hunterdon, Middlesex, Morris, Somerset, Sussex and Warren counties, effective until 7:45 p.m. A flood advisory is in effect for Essex, Hudson and Union counties until 6:15 p.m.

Update (3:25 p.m.): A flash flood warning has been issued for most areas of Monmouth County, effective until 7:30 p.m.

A flood advisory has been issued for the east-central region of Ocean County, effective until 6:15 p.m. The weather service says minor flooding could occur in that area, including parts of the Garden State Parkway.

A flood advisory has also been issued for Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Mercer, Middlesex and Monmouth until 5:30 p.m.

More storms on the way

More thunderstorms are expected to fire up late Wednesday afternoon and into the evening as a slow-moving cold front pushes its way across our region, and some of the heavy downpours could hamper the flow of traffic during the evening commute.

All 21 counties in New Jersey are under a severe thunderstorm watch until 9 p.m., and many counties are under a flash flood watch, meaning conditions are favorable for strong thunderstorms and heavy downpours.

The thunderstorms should bring an end to the 90-degree temperatures that have baked the state during the past four days.

Live weather radar

Len Melisurgo may be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @LensReality or like him on Facebook. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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