HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Harmony, NJ

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HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Harmony, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Harmony, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Harmony, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Harmony, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Harmony, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Harmony, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Harmony, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Harmony, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Harmony, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Harmony, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Harmony, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Harmony, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When there is an increased concentration of growth hormone by the pituitary gland, there are positive benefits to the body. Some benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Harmony, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Harmony, NJ

Employees at New Jersey’s Harmony Foundation and Harmony Dispensary Join Wave Voting in Favor of Unionizing With UFCW

As company announces exciting plans to expand medical marijuana business and enter adult use market, workers will enjoy important union protections, trainings and benefits.WEST BERLIN, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 360 is pleased to announce the decision by workers at Harmony Foundation, and its Harmony Dispensary in Secaucus, NJ., to unionize as members of UFCW. Harmony employees can now add their names to the q...

As company announces exciting plans to expand medical marijuana business and enter adult use market, workers will enjoy important union protections, trainings and benefits.

WEST BERLIN, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 360 is pleased to announce the decision by workers at Harmony Foundation, and its Harmony Dispensary in Secaucus, NJ., to unionize as members of UFCW. Harmony employees can now add their names to the quickly growing ranks of UFCW Local 360 from across New Jersey’s young marijuana economy. Recently, Harmony announced its intention to expand into the adult use marijuana market, and to open locations in Hoboken, Jersey City – as well as a new cultivation site in Lafayette.

“We’ve always said that UFCW supports cannabis industry workers from seed to sale”

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“It’s great news for these workers, and their families. They carefully considered, and then selected, the career-supporting benefits that come with joining Local 360,” said Hugh Giordano, UFCW Local 360’s director of organizing. “From making sure that sick and suffering patients get the help they need, to educating them on how to properly experience the benefits of medical marijuana and supporting the expansion of this industry, they’ve shown their commitment to the promise of the cannabis economy.”

“Across the cannabis industry, a new generation of workers is discovering that bona fide labor unions play a critical role in properly balancing the needs of employees, communities and employers,” said Sam Ferraino, Jr., UFCW Local 360 president. “This vote is not just a show of support in the promise of unions to positively impact businesses, families and communities, it’s also a declaration in support of high operating standards and a diverse and skilled workforce with good working conditions.”

“We’ve always said that UFCW supports cannabis industry workers from seed to sale,” added Giordano. “And with a company like Harmony, that’s clearly the case. They’re already a name in medical marijuana, with their own cultivation and dispensary operations, and they’re actively looking to expand, both geographically through new stores and by entering the adult use market. It’s the right time to join with Local 360, and we’re proud that these workers came to the same conclusion.”

From seed to sale, UFCW is a recognized leader in organizing cannabis industry employees and is the official AFL-CIO designated cannabis labor union. Representing tens of thousands of cannabis workers in dispensaries, labs, delivery, manufacturing, processing, grow facilities and more, UFCW works with employees and business owners to achieve the shared goal of a regulated cannabis industry that delivers family-sustaining jobs and is focused on social equity.

About United Food and Commercial Workers: The UFCW International Union represents over 1.3 million hardworking families across the U.S. and Canada. These members work in essential industries such as Retail, Warehousing, Manufacturing, Healthcare, Transportation, the Public Sector and Cannabis.

Harmony Not Approved By State To Sell Recreational Marijuana

Harmony CEO Shaya Brodchandel said he had no idea why the state declined to approve Harmony, calling it "?inexplicable."SECAUCUS, NJ — Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated Harmony was approved by the state to sell recreational marijuana. The state actually did not approve its application.For reasons unknown, Harmony Dispensary — the medical marijuana shop located in Secaucus — was not approved by the state of New Jersey this week to expand into recreation...

Harmony CEO Shaya Brodchandel said he had no idea why the state declined to approve Harmony, calling it "?inexplicable."

SECAUCUS, NJ — Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated Harmony was approved by the state to sell recreational marijuana. The state actually did not approve its application.

For reasons unknown, Harmony Dispensary — the medical marijuana shop located in Secaucus — was not approved by the state of New Jersey this week to expand into recreational marijuana sales.

Harmony president and CEO Shaya Brodchandel said he had no idea why the state declined to approve Harmony, calling it "inexplicable" and "a needless delay."

In July, Harmony applied to the state to sell recreational marijuana, and expected to be on Thursday's agenda before the Cannabis Regulatory Commission. Brodchandel said in this NJ.com article he very much expected to get the state's approval Thrusday.

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However, for reasons unknown, the Cannabis Regulatory Commission (CRC) did not bring their application up for a vote.

"The board meeting agendas are set by the chair in consultation with staff, and Harmony was never on the October 27 agenda," said Toni-Anne Blake, a spokeswoman for New Jersey's Cannabis Regulatory Commission. "Harmony’s certification remains under review. Also, no one is guaranteed a particular outcome from Board considerations."

"We are disappointed that the Cannabis Regulatory Commission failed to act on our certification to enter the adult-use market as the first non-profit, NJ-based operator," said Brodchandel in a statement released to the media.

"Despite satisfying all CRC requirements, this needless delay impacts our immediate hiring plans, meaning the men and women of the communities we serve must also wait for good paying jobs," he continued. "This inexplicable lack of action on Harmony’s application is an opportunity lost for our social equity efforts, medicinal programming, workforce development as well as the communities we serve."

"While we consider our options, we will continue to provide the highest quality and most affordable medical cannabis to our long-standing patients. We hope the CRC upholds their commitment to expanding the industry by granting Harmony the opportunity to enter the dual market," he added.

It's widely known Harmony very much wants to expand into recreational marijuana sales. Harmony has long said on their website they planned to start selling recreational weed "in the very near future."

On Thursday, the Cannabis Regulatory Commission approved 18 other new pot licenses across the state.

To give a picture of how booming New Jersey's marijuana industry is, the Cannabis Regulatory Commission has given out 801 marijuana business licenses since the state legalized weed last year.

Should they get state approval, Harmony does not need any further approval from the town of Secaucus: They can begin selling both medical and recreational marijuana immediately.

Any other new pot business seeking to open in Secaucus would have to first get a license from the town.

This past March, the town of Secaucus created a very limited zone in which marijuana businesses can operate in town. In fact, the zone is limited to one specific building: The grey, rectangular building on Castle Road that currently houses Harmony. A maximum of five lots inside the building could be used for marijuana-based businesses.

Other pot-related businesses have indeed expressed interest in opening there, Secaucus town administrator Gary Jeffas told Patch a few weeks ago, but none so far have formally applied.

Brodchandel also plans to open two new marijuana shops in Hudson County, in Hoboken and Jersey City. Those would also be called Harmony and would sell both medical and recreational marijuana.

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First non-profit medical marijuana dispensary in N.J. poised to sell adult legal weed

A four-year old dispensary in Secaucus is poised to become the first non-profit medical marijuana dispensary to offer adult weed in the Garden State.Harmony Foundation is expected to go before the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory Commission Thursday for final state approvals to expand into the adult recreational weed market at its Secaucus alternative treatment center at 600 Meadowlands Parkway, a top Harmony executive confirmed to NJ Advance Media.“This is an exciting step forward for Harmony, and, we believe, for the grow...

A four-year old dispensary in Secaucus is poised to become the first non-profit medical marijuana dispensary to offer adult weed in the Garden State.

Harmony Foundation is expected to go before the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory Commission Thursday for final state approvals to expand into the adult recreational weed market at its Secaucus alternative treatment center at 600 Meadowlands Parkway, a top Harmony executive confirmed to NJ Advance Media.

“This is an exciting step forward for Harmony, and, we believe, for the growing cannabis industry in New Jersey,” Shaya Brodchandel, President and CEO of Harmony, said in a statement. “By seeking to become the first New Jersey-based ATC to be granted an expansion into the adult-use market we are showing that cannabis businesses born in this state have the ability to join those multi-state operators and thrive, reinvesting our successes into our local communities.

“We believe that we have met all of the obligations put in place by regulators, and are ready to join the dual market,” added Brodchandel.

Harmony is one of the original six alternative treatment centers (ATCs) approved in the state. It began operating in June 2018 under the state’s Medicinal Cannabis Program as both a cultivation and dispensary facility.

Since the statewide launch of recreational adult weed on April 21, eight multi-state operators, or MSOs, have come to dominate the New Jersey cannabis market by opening and owning all 19 stores that currently sell it. Ascend Wellness - which was granted CRC approvals on Sept. 9 to expand is currently working on securing final municipal approvals to sell adult weed in Fort Lee, where it has sold medical marijuana since Aug. 12.

If the CRC approves on Thursday, Harmony would become the first non-multi-state operator allowed to expand into the dual medical and recreational market.

Brodchandel said once it receives the nod from the state, Harmony will continue to grant priority to medical patients and their registered caregivers as mandated by the CRC by offering exclusive hours, designated service areas, discount eligibility, delivery services and curbside pickup.

“We have a proven track record of serving the medical cannabis community for many years, and we will not turn our back on those that use our products for health purposes,” Brodchandel said.

In addition, winning state approval paves the way for the company’s growth. Brochandel said Harmony has plans to open two Hudson County satellite dispensaries that would offer both medical and recreational marijuana in Hoboken and Jersey City.

Brodchandel said the additional sites will create more jobs and social equity opportunities for minority and women aspirants who want to join the cannabis industry in keeping with the intent of legalization.

A key component of the 2021 cannabis law signed by Gov. Phil Murphy is restorative justice for communities of color hurt most by the nation’s War on Drugs by earmarking a portion of revenue from adult weed sales to go toward social equity programs to benefit them.

“Through our social equity plan, creating real jobs for New Jersey residents or reinvesting our profits back into the community, Harmony has shown a commitment to the state and people of New Jersey,” Brodchandel added. “We look forward to expanding our presence at job fairs, and providing additional expungement clinics, reentry support, and mentorship opportunities.”

Brodchandel said his commitment extends beyond growing Harmony Dispensary and wants to benefit the entire cannabis industry in New Jersey – which is poised to become one of the nation’s largest based on revenue.

“As Harmony continues to grow, and achieve even greater business success, our core mission will match the intentions of Governor Murphy for the industry and be a force for lifting up others that have previously not been afforded opportunities for entrepreneurial success,” Brodchandel said Wednesday.

The CRC meeting will be the first in-person gathering by the five-member panel since it was created due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Judge denies request for independent manager to run N.J. medical marijuana dispensary

Although a medical marijuana dispensary in Hudson County has demonstrated “atrocious” record-keeping practices, it doesn’t need an outside consultant to take control of the operation, a state judge ruled Friday.State Superior Court Judge Edward A. Jerejian in Bergen County denied a request by the investor-owners to name a custodian to...

Although a medical marijuana dispensary in Hudson County has demonstrated “atrocious” record-keeping practices, it doesn’t need an outside consultant to take control of the operation, a state judge ruled Friday.

State Superior Court Judge Edward A. Jerejian in Bergen County denied a request by the investor-owners to name a custodian to run Harmony Foundation because the special fiscal agent he assigned to oversee its financial operations in December “is the proper vehicle...to be the eyes and ears of the court.”

That fiscal agent, retired Judge Peter Doyne, “whom everyone respects” just approved the hiring of an outside accountant Thursday. This is enough oversight for now, Jerejian said.

“But we are just getting warmed up,” Jerejian told the warring parties. “I am more curious than ever to solve this mystery to see who is being honest with this court.”

Secaucus Investors LLC, which was awarded a controlling interest of Harmony last fall in an arbitration case, had requested both the hiring of an accountant and the appointment of a custodian to oversee operations at the dispensary. Secaucus sued Harmony’s operators, Shaya Brodchandel and Yehuda Meer, for allegedly running up $30 million in debt, diverting $1 million to a dispensary in Israel operated by Brodchandel’s brother and hiring family and friends for unnecessary work.

Secaucus Investors Attorney Louis Modugno requested the court name David Knowlton, the former board chairman of Compassionate Care Foundation, one of the original medicinal marijuana dispensaries in Egg Harbor, as custodian, because the fiscal agent alone cannot oversee the questionable decision-making that is going on.

“Harmony in 2021 issued $280,000 in checks payable to cash. Cash!,” Modugno said. Harmony’s chief financial officer found nothing wrong with this, Modugno said. “Ok, so give us a list. Justify $20,000. Justify $5,000...Tell us where the money went. Why is a nonprofit — or any business in this day and age — cutting checks to cash?”

Harmony, which has appealed the arbitration ruling, has accused Secaucus of making “fanciful” unsubstantial claims to discredit Brodchandel and Meer and force the sale of the nonprofit dispensary to an unnamed multi-state operator.

Harmony “has more than $1 million in its checking account today,” and “brings in $60,000 a day,” Attorney Jason Cyrulnik told the judge. “The company is profitable and is one of the most respected members of this industry in New Jersey.”

The outcome of the proceedings is vitally important to Harmony Foundation and the other medicinal marijuana operators, who ultimately need approval from the state Cannabis Regulatory Commission to expand into the future 21-and-older legal weed market. But whatever is decided is not the last word. The commission must sign off on who owns and operates the business, and is not bound by the rulings of either the arbitrator or the judge.

The commission is watching what is going on in court. After Secaucus filed its request for a custodian based on “reckless conspiracy theories” which was covered in the press, the CRC sent a letter to Harmony and opened an “inquiry,” Cyrulnik said.

In tones that hinted at weariness and frustration, Jerejian said he questioned the so-called altruistic motives of Harmony and Secaucus Investors and its mission to serve its thousands of registered patients.

“It’s always about the money. And there is a lot of money here, and there is a lot of opportunity here,” Jerejian said. “That’s why we are here.”

Secaucus Investors said Harmony has only four promissory notes to show loaning nearly $4 million to CXDG, a California company.

“The record keeping is atrocious. It’s a $100 million business,” Jerejian said. “They lent out millions of dollars and there is no paperwork?” The fiscal agent will ask the account to investigate, the judge added.

The judge also questioned how Harmony could say it had no financial interest in the medical marijuana dispensary run by Brodchandel’s brother that is also called Harmony. “These are mere coincidences?”

“The special fiscal agent needs to know more about Israel,” he said.

“The court is not impressed by either side at this point,” Jerejian said. “If the parties decided to work together to maximize what should be the future of this entity, it would be obviously commendable.”

Following the 2-1/2 hour virtual hearing, Harmony attorney Peter Slocum praised the judge’s decision.

“The Court properly denied the meritless application. Harmony looks forward to continuing to disprove all of the lender’s reckless, false, and slanderous accusations in due course,” Slocum said.

Why do local cannabis entrepreneurs find state processes difficult?

Following the launch of the recreational cannabis marketplace in April, eight out-of-state entities have dominated the landscape, opening and operating all 20 dispensaries currently licensed to sell across New Jersey.However, Harmony Foundation in Secaucus is hoping to change that by becoming the first New Jersey-based, nonprofit medical dispensary to expand into the state&rsq...

Following the launch of the recreational cannabis marketplace in April, eight out-of-state entities have dominated the landscape, opening and operating all 20 dispensaries currently licensed to sell across New Jersey.

However, Harmony Foundation in Secaucus is hoping to change that by becoming the first New Jersey-based, nonprofit medical dispensary to expand into the state’s adult-use market.

Harmony, one of the recipients of the original six alternative treatment center (ATC) permits granted by the New Jersey Department of Health, began operating in June 2018 under the Medicinal Cannabis Program and has had its permit renewed annually by the state ever since.

Besides helping Harmony expand its business, the foundation believes becoming the first retailer rooted in the state to offer adult-use cannabis will be a great example for New Jerseyans looking to enter what is expected to be a more than $2 billion a year industry by 2026.

“We are showing that cannabis businesses born in this state have the ability to join those multi-state operators and thrive, reinvesting our successes into our local communities,” said Shaya Brodchandel, president and chief executive officer of Harmony.

“This is an exciting step forward for Harmony, and, we believe, for the growing cannabis industry in New Jersey,” added Brodchandel, who reiterated that even after entering the recreational market, the foundation will continue to grant priority to patients and registered caregivers.

Located at 600 Meadowlands Parkway, Harmony’s cultivation and dispensary facility currently serves 6,159 medicinal-use patients who are seeking relief from ailments such as pain, arthritis, nausea from cancer treatment and a reduction in the impact of epilepsy-related seizures.

Harmony’s second location in Lafayette, which won operational approval in May, has allowed the foundation to expand its product variety through onsite cultivation, manufacturing and extraction.

“As Harmony continues to grow, and achieve even greater business success, our core mission will match the intentions of Gov. Murphy for the industry and be a force for lifting up others that have previously not been afforded opportunities for entrepreneurial success,” Brodchandel said.

A key component of New Jersey’s cannabis law is that at least 70% of all tax revenue from recreational sales be invested into impact zones, which are communities with higher-than-average unemployment rates, crime indexes and cannabis arrests.

The state’s licensing process also gives a 15% priority to social equity business applications and those from certified minority-, women- and disabled-veteran-owned businesses. According to the most recent data from the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory Commission (CRC), the state board that regulates the industry and oversees licensing, 34% of licenses have gone to minority-owned businesses and 24% have been awarded to businesses owned by women and disabled veterans.

However, entrepreneurs from those backgrounds face several challenges when it comes to establishing themselves in the emerging cannabis industry. Along with high start-up costs and access to capital, prospective business owners face a tight real estate market overall, making it hard to find somewhere to set up shop

They’re also up against more established, multistate operators who have years of experience and more resources at their disposal. Of the 20 stores currently selling recreational cannabis, three are operated by Curaleaf, three by Verano, two by Acreage, two by RISE, two by Ascend, three by TerrAscend, three by AYR Wellness and two by The Cannabist/Columbia Care.

Last month, the New Jersey Economic Development Authority, along with the New Jersey Business Action Center and the CRC, announced they’d reach out to stakeholders to learn more about the obstacles. The input, they said, could be used to help inform a potential cannabis grant program that brings equity and economic opportunity to those who have been impacted by cannabis prohibition.

Brodchandel, who is also president of the New Jersey Cannabis Trade Association, has spent the past few years working to help entrepreneurs overcome the challenges associated with opening a cannabis business. Besides providing mentorship, he co-presented the Minority Cannabis Academy, a first-of-its-kind nonprofit workforce development program that aims to provide a pathway for minorities that want to begin working in New Jersey’s legalized marijuana marketplace.

“Shaya began helping me before there truly was a cannabis industry in New Jersey,” Eli Terry, a Jersey City-based cultivator who looks forward to bringing his own talents and expertise into the market, said. “As I sought out help to navigate the regulatory framework Shaya not only took my phone calls, but he invited me in, he sat down with me, he mentored me.”

Terry admits that even though he has been growing cannabis and fine tuning his own strains as a college student since 2015, he didn’t understand the intricacies of entering the market under the rules put in place by state regulators.

“He never promised me anything,” Terry said of Brodchandel’s support through the process. “But he taught me how to think like an entrepreneur.”

Teaneck resident, scientist and engineer, and aspiring entrepreneur Tony Campbell said Brodchandel’s willingness to help others shows that he “truly wants to make the industry strong in New Jersey.”

“He knows that by nurturing us, and others like us, the cannabis industry in New Jersey will mature,” said Campbell, who received a conditional license from the CRC. He went on to say that if Harmony was given an opportunity to play an even bigger role in the marketplace, Brodchandel will continue to help guide others.

“Shaya knows things, and he’s willing to share that knowledge,” Campbell said. “For those of us trying to get our own starts in the industry, that’s wildly valuable.”

As part of its plan to enter the dual market, Harmony aims to open satellite dispensaries at 95 Hudson St. in Hoboken and 227 Coles St. in Jersey City, which, it said, will be “additional job creators.”

“Through our Social Equity Plan, creating real jobs for New Jersey residents or reinvesting our profits back into the community, Harmony has shown a commitment to the state and people of New Jersey,” Brodchandel explained. “We look forward to expanding our presence at job fairs, and providing additional expungement clinics, reentry support, and mentorship opportunities.”

Before it can begin selling adult-use cannabis, Harmony must secure final approval from the CRC. After applying in July, Harmony executives thought it would receive the green light during the CRC’s Oct. 27 meeting, however the application did not come up for a vote.

Toni-Anne Blake, communications director for the CRC, said, “Board meeting agendas are set by the chair in consultation with staff and Harmony was never on the Oct. 27 agenda.”

During the meeting, the five member-CRC granted Curaleaf, New Jersey’s largest cannabis grower, permission to begin adult-use sales at its Bordentown location.

The board also approved 297 conditional licenses, bringing the total number of such permits issued since March up to 801. And, the state signed off on the first 18 annual adult-use cannabis business licenses – 10 of which were conversion applications to annual licenses and eight annual license applications.

“This is a special milestone for the commission and for New Jersey’s new legalized industry. With the awarding of eight cultivation licenses and three manufacturing licenses we are setting good groundwork for New Jersey’s cannabis market,” said CRC Chairwoman Dianna Houenou. “We hope to see these facilities up and running as soon as possible to be local Garden State suppliers to the retailers who also got their annuals today and the others that will be licensed in the future.”

Additionally, the CRC voted to extend the length of time for certain conditional licensees to apply for conversion to an annual license and will now allow up to two 45-day periods.

It also increased the Social Equity Excise Fee that cultivators will pay for 2023 to $1.52 per ounce, up from $1.10 per ounce.

Following the meeting, Brodchandel said, “While Harmony congratulates all the new awardees, we are also disappointed that the CRC failed to act on our expanded ATC certification to enter the adult-use market as the first nonprofit N.J.-based operator.”

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