HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Highland Lakes, NJ

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HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Highland Lakes, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

 Human Growth Hormone Highland Lakes, NJ

Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Highland Lakes, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

 Ipamorelin Highland Lakes, NJ

Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Highland Lakes, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Highland Lakes, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Highland Lakes, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Highland Lakes, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Highland Lakes, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Highland Lakes, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Highland Lakes, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Highland Lakes, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Highland Lakes, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Highland Lakes, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Highland Lakes, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Highland Lakes, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Highland Lakes, NJ

These towns have the highest property taxes in each of N.J.’s 21 counties

The average property tax bill in New Jersey was $9,284 in 2021, an increase of nearly 2% over the previous year.A homeowner’s bill is determined by the rate a municipality charges and how much the town says a home is worth. Every town is different in the way it determines home value and tax rates, and property tax bills vary from county to county.In some towns, the value of a home is based on what it would sell for on the market. In others, the length of time since the last revaluation is the driving factor, leading to lo...

The average property tax bill in New Jersey was $9,284 in 2021, an increase of nearly 2% over the previous year.

A homeowner’s bill is determined by the rate a municipality charges and how much the town says a home is worth. Every town is different in the way it determines home value and tax rates, and property tax bills vary from county to county.

In some towns, the value of a home is based on what it would sell for on the market. In others, the length of time since the last revaluation is the driving factor, leading to lower assessed values and often higher tax rates.

The equalized tax rate creates a level playing field for comparing property taxes from town to town. It shows what your rate would be if every home was assessed at 100 percent of what it would sell for on the open market.

Here’s a look at the towns with the highest property taxes in each county, as well as those with the highest equalized rates.

Here’s the county-by-county breakdown of the highest-taxed towns:

Atlantic County

The average property tax bill in Longport was $11,117 in 2021, the highest in Atlantic County.

Runners up

Linwood: $10,627

Margate: $8,468

The equalized tax rate in Pleasantville was 4.435, the highest in Atlantic County.

Runners up

Egg Harbor: 4.429

Linwood: 3.525

Bergen County

The average property tax bill in Demarest was $21,983 in 2021, the highest in Bergen County.

Runners up

Tenafly: $21,966

Alpine: $21,438

The equalized tax rate in Hackensack was 3.015, the highest in Bergen County.

Runners up

Ridgefield Park: 2.865

Dumont: 2.811

Burlington County

The average property tax bill in Moorestown was $12,000 in 2021, the highest in Burlington County.

Runners up

Chesterfield: $11,606

Medford: $10,549

The equalized tax rate in Beverly was 4.404 in, the highest in Burlington County.

Runners up

Burlington City: 3.812

Willingboro: 3.662

Camden County

The average property tax bill in Tavistock was $30,715 in 2021, the highest in Camden County. While technically a municipality, Tavistock is in a unique category. It was formed in 1929 so members of the Tavistock Country Club could bypass laws that prohibited golfing on Sunday

There were only three homes and roughly a dozen residents in Tavistock as of 2019.

Runners up

Haddonfield: $16,121

Pine Valley: $11,993

The equalized tax rate in Woodlynne was 7.054 in 2021, the highest in Camden County.

Runners up

Audubon Park: 6.49

Hi-nella: 4.797

Cape May County

The average property tax bill in Stone Harbor was $10,488 in 2021, the highest in Cape May County.

Runners up

Avalon: $8,972

Cape May: $6,701

The equalized tax rate in Wildwood was 2.234 in 2021, the highest in Cape May County.

Runners up

Woodbine: 1.849

Middle: 1.727

Cumberland County

The average property tax bill in Greenwich was $6,425 in 2021, the highest in Cumberland County.

Runners up

Upper Deerfield: $5,889

Stow Creek: $5,860

The equalized tax rate in Bridgeton was 4.31 in 2021, the highest in Cumberland County.

Runners up

Greenwich: 3.529

Deerfield: 3.172

Essex County

The average property tax bill in Millburn was $24,485 in 2021, the highest in Essex County.

Runners up

Glen Ridge: $21,647

Essex Fells: $20,374

The equalized tax rate in Orange was 4.728 in 2021, the highest in Essex County.

Runners up

Irvington: 4.337

West Orange: 3.647

Gloucester County

The average property tax bill in Wenonah was $10,971 in 2021, the highest in Gloucester County.

Runners up

Woolwich: $10,950

Harrison: $10,498

The equalized tax rate in Westville was 4.319 in 2021, the highest in Gloucester County.

Runners up

Woodbury: 4.23

Paulsboro: 4.119

Hudson County

The average property tax bill in Weehawken was $12,138 in 2021, the highest in Hudson County.

Runners up

Bayonne: $10,451

Kearny: $10,146

The equalized tax rate in Guttenberg was 2.64 in 2021, the highest in Hudson County.

Runners up

Union City: 2.4

Bayonne: 2.382

Hunterdon County

The average property tax bill in Tewksbury was $14,897 in 2021, the highest in Hunterdon County.

Runners up

Califon: $11,801

Clinton: $11,336

The equalized tax rate in High Bridge was 3.759 in 2021, the highest in Hunterdon County.

Runners up

Hampton: 3.569

Califon: 3.369

Mercer County

The average property tax bill in Princeton was $20,510 in 2021, the highest in Mercer County.

Runners up

West Windsor: $14,930

Hopewell: $14,160

The equalized tax rate in Trenton was 4.808 in 2021, the highest in Mercer County.

Runners up

Hightstown: 3.591

Ewing: 3.353

Middlesex County

The average property tax bill in Highland Park was $12,348 in 2021, the highest in Middlesex County.

Runners up

Metuchen: $11,681

Plainsboro: $10,882

The equalized tax rate in Highland Park was 3.57 in 2021, the highest in Middlesex County.

Runners up

Jamesburg: 3.108

Dunellen: 2.923

Monmouth County

The average property tax bill in Rumson was $21,591 in 2021, the highest in Monmouth County.

Runners up

Deal: $19,757

Allenhurst: $16,911

The equalized tax rate in Roosevelt was 2.999 in 2021, the highest in Monmouth County.

Runners up

Allentown: 2.827

Keansburg: 2.644

Morris County

The average property tax bill in Mountain Lakes was $21,868 in 2021, the highest in Morris County.

Runners up

Mendham Township: $19,824

Mendham Borough: $16,230

The equalized tax rate in Netcong was 3.181 in 2021, the highest in Morris County.

Runners up

Rockaway: 2.942

Mount Olive: 2.914

Ocean County

The average property tax bill in Mantoloking was $19,274 in 2021, the highest in Ocean County.

Runners up

Bay Head: $13,906

Oceanport: $11,231

The equalized tax rate in South Toms River was 2.745 in 2021, the highest in Ocean County.

Runners up

Lakehurst: 2.577

Eagleswood: 2.489

Passaic County

The average property tax bill in Wayne was $12,950 in 2021, the highest in Passaic County.

Runners up

Ringwood: $11,837

Prospect Park: $11,454

The equalized tax rate in Prospect Park was 3.492 in 2021, the highest in Passaic County.

Runners up

Haledon: 3.369

Bloomingdale: 3.335

Salem County

The average property tax bill in Pilesgrove was $9,231 in 2021, the highest in Salem County.

Runners up

Woodstown: $7,826

Pennsville: $7,111

The equalized tax rate in Salem City was 6.026 in 2021, the highest in Salem County.

Runners up

Penns Grove: 4.788

Pennsville: 4.336

Somerset County

The average property tax bill in Bernardsville was $16,276 in 2021, the highest in Somerset County.

Runners up

Montgomery: $15,837

Watchung: $15,673

The equalized tax rate in Somerville was 3.107 in 2021, the highest in Somerset County.

Runners up

North Plainfield: 3.046

South Bound Brook: 2.869

Sussex County

The average property tax bill in Sparta was $12,416 in 2021, the highest in Sussex County.

Runners up

Green: $11,356

Fredon: $10,107

The equalized tax rate in Newton was 3.816 in 2021, the highest in Sussex County.

Runners up

Stanhope: 3.645

Hamburg: 3.636

Union County

The average property tax bill in Summit was $18,254 in 2021, the highest in Union County.

Runners up

Westfield: $17,319

New Providence: $14,770

The equalized tax rate in Winfield was 21.424 in 2021, the highest in Union County.

There are approximately 250 buildings in Winfield, all of which are owned by Winfield Mutual Housing Corporation, which is owned by the residents.

Runners up

Roselle: 3.512

Rahway: 3.15

Warren County

The average property tax bill in Franklin was $9,387 in 2021, the highest in Warren County.

Runners up

Greenwich: $9,216

Washington: $9,059

The equalized tax rate in Washington was 3.667 in 2021, the highest in Warren County.

Runners up

Phillipsburg: 3.505

Pohatcong: 3.498

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The slow, frustrating slog to launch new NJ marijuana businesses

TRENTON – State regulators say they’re moving as fast as they can to approve licenses for businesses seeking to sell legal recreational marijuana. bBut some applicants are frustrated by the pace and head start being enjoyed by corporations that have expanded their medical cannabis businesses.To date, 308 conditional licenses for new recreational marijuana businesses have been granted: 130 cultivators, 68 manufacturers and 110 retailers. That’s around one-third of the total who are seeking such licenses, with around 3...

TRENTON – State regulators say they’re moving as fast as they can to approve licenses for businesses seeking to sell legal recreational marijuana. bBut some applicants are frustrated by the pace and head start being enjoyed by corporations that have expanded their medical cannabis businesses.

To date, 308 conditional licenses for new recreational marijuana businesses have been granted: 130 cultivators, 68 manufacturers and 110 retailers. That’s around one-third of the total who are seeking such licenses, with around 350 others waiting for initial priority reviews or final scoring and others told they need to cure shortcomings in their application.

Conditional licenses allow the companies to secure locations, municipal approvals and more – but not open their doors for business. For that, they will need to convert to an annual license, a more complicated approval process that involves a deeper dive into a company’s finances and an on-site inspection.

Companies can skip the conditional licensing and apply directly for annual licenses, and around 240 have done that. But they are stuck in a holding pattern, as the Cannabis Regulatory Commission prioritizes the conditional licenses first and is still working through those.

CRC Executive Director Jeff Brown said that eventually conditional licenses will be reviewed within 90 days, with annuals and conditional-to-annual conversions taking a bit longer, but that’s not possible yet with 1,182 license applications since December.

“We knew that we would receive a ton of applications at first, and we’re devoting the resources needed to get through that initial rush,” Brown said.

Applications for cultivating and manufacturing licenses began to be accepted in December. Applications for retailer licenses began to be accepted in March.

Scott Bent, who is seeking a conditional license for the Euphorium Dispensary, says the CRC needs to speed up because corporate dispensaries have an advantage.

“Get your focus back on track because you are failing miserably,” Bent told the commission at its meeting Thursday. “There is not one approved annual application. There is a bunch of people with a lot of questions. But there are doors wide open for the existing millionaires to make more millions.”

Brennan McGrath said that continuing the conditionals-first approach is hurting businesses. He said businesses seeking annual licenses are already making payments on properties they can’t open while multi-state dispensaries expand and further dominate.

“Why not show support for New Jersey small business owners and start awarding annual licenses to those who have put in a tremendous amount of time, effort and money to meet all of your requirements?” McGrath said.

Brown said the pivot to annual licenses is coming soon.

“I am confident that we will make our way through the remaining 284 over the next month or so, next couple months,” Brown said, referring to the number awaiting their completeness check and final scoring.

Osbert Orduña, chief executive officer of The Cannabis Place, said he understands the state was swamped but that to speed things up, the CRC should meet sooner than September to approve the recommendations of the staff.

“This will greatly assist all applicants, especially social equity and diversely held license applicants, who are currently paying costs for real estate, holding costs, interest on borrowed funds and additional expenses that small businesses do not have the luxury of affording on a long-term basis,” Orduña said.

The CRC wasn’t due to meet again until Sept. 22 but at Vice Chairman Sam Delgado’s urging voted to move that up by two weeks, to the week after Labor Day.

“These applicants and businesses have consultants. They have legal and lease payments to make,” Delgado said. “To some, a delay may make or even break them financially or be extremely expensive, costly.”

Michael Symons is the Statehouse bureau chief for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Parades, ceremonies and more Memorial Day events

New JerseySaturday, May 28Hopatcong Memorial Day Parade: Hopatcong, N.J.The Hopatcong Recreation Department’s Memorial Day parade starts 10:00 a.m. at the DPW Parking Lot and will end at Veteran’s Field.Flowers for Veterans: Sparta, N.J.Karen Ann Quinlan Hospice and Lisa’s Stone Brook Florist will work together to honor the fallen military, late veterans and their spouses interred at the Northern New Jersey Veterans Memorial Cemetery ...

New Jersey

Saturday, May 28

Hopatcong Memorial Day Parade: Hopatcong, N.J.

The Hopatcong Recreation Department’s Memorial Day parade starts 10:00 a.m. at the DPW Parking Lot and will end at Veteran’s Field.

Flowers for Veterans: Sparta, N.J.

Karen Ann Quinlan Hospice and Lisa’s Stone Brook Florist will work together to honor the fallen military, late veterans and their spouses interred at the Northern New Jersey Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Sparta, N.J. from 11 a.m. to noon. Volunteers will place a flower in front of each headstone while quietly reading the inscription and then thanking the person for their service.

Cumberland River Memorial Day Ceremony: Rockaway. N.J.

The annual ceremony starts at 1 p.m., recognizing the Jerseymen who lost their lives crossing the Cumberland River as they returned to their homes during the Civil War.

Sunday, May 29

Highland Lakes Memorial Day Events: Highland Lakes, N.J.

The Highland Lakes Clubhouse Committee’s first breakfast of the summer is from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Adults are $9, children ages 3-10 are $6, and children under 3 years are free. Breakfast will be followed by patriotic crafts and fun for kids at 11 a.m. The Memorial Day Observance Ceremony hosted by the Senior Club will also start at 11 a.m.

Monday, May 30

Franklin Memorial Day Parade: Franklin, N.J.

The Sgt. Francis M. Glynn American Legion Post 132’s Memorial Day parade steps off from the Post at 10:30 a.m., proceeding on Rutherford Ave. and Main Street to the war memorial where a service will be held. Legion members will also conduct memorial services at St. Thomas Cemetery in Ogdensburg at 7:30 a.m., at the Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Franklin 8:30 a.m., and at the North Church Cemetery on Route 94 at 9:15 a.m.

Sparta Memorial Day Parade and Ceremony: Sparta, N.J.

The 47th Annual Memorial Day Parade and Ceremony, hosted by Sparta VFW Post 7248 and Sparta Township, kicks off at 10 a.m. The parade route starts at East Shore Trail and will continue to the Sparta Library. A ceremony will follow at the end of the parade. Complimentary lunch and drinks will be served at the Sparta VFW afterwards.

Memorial Remembrance Day Ceremony: Budd Lake, N.J.

A remembrance ceremony will be held at the All Veterans Memorial Ceremonial Grounds at Turkey Brook Park from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Honoring Our Heroes at the Memorial Day Parade: Newton, N.J.

The Greater Newton Chamber of Commerce’s Memorial Day Parade kicks off at 10 a.m. The parade, which begins at Lower Spring Street and proceeds down Spring Street and Moran Street to Memory Park, honors service men and women while paying tribute to the community’s fallen heroes.

Memorial Day Parade: Wayne, N.J.

The Wayne Township Memorial Day Parade is at 10 a.m., starting at Ramapo Shopping Plaza at corner of Valley Road and Hamburg Turnpike, and ending at Wayne Valley Municipal Building. Attendees are encouraged to line Valley Road to celebrate.

West Milford Memorial Day Parade: West Milford, N.J.

The parade will begin at Veterans Memorial Park. Music will start at 10 a.m., and the parade and ceremony will follow.

New York

Thursday, May 26

Annual Memorial Weekend Carnival: Washingtonville, N.Y.

Washingtonville Knights of Columbus’ Annual Memorial Weekend Carnival at Vern Allen Park kicks off at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 26 and ends on Monday, May 30. Unlimited ride wristbands, food and games will be available for purchase.

Sunday, May 29

Town of Woodbury Memorial Day Parade: Woodbury, N.Y.

The Town of Woodbury Memorial Day Parade kicks off at 1 p.m. and will proceed north on Route 32, pausing at the Summit Ave. Monument in Central Valley at 1:10 p.m., and the Victory Park Monument at 2 p.m.. in Highland Mills to conduct brief Wreath Laying Ceremonies. The parade then continues north to the Cemetery of The Highlands at 2:15 p.m., where it will end with a Memorial Day Ceremony at the Veteran’s Monument and Firemen’s Monument.

Monday, May 30

Village of Monroe Memorial Day Parade: Monroe, N.Y.

Formation of the parade will be at Smith’s Clove Park beginning at 12:15pm with step off at 1:30pm. The parade will proceed onto Spring St., turning left onto Mapes Place through the underpass to the Monroe Volunteer Ambulance Corps Memorial. The Color Guard will present arms, and wreaths will be placed. The parade will then make a right turn at Carpenter Place through downtown Lakes Street, then left onto Route 17M, proceeding to Veterans Memorial Park and the Monroe Cemetery for formal dedication and disbanding.

#TheHonorProject at West Point Cemetery: West Point, N.Y.

The Travis Manion Foundation is recruiting volunteers to lay handcrafted American Flags of Valor coins at West Point Cemetery on Memorial Day, May 30 at 9 a.m. To volunteer, visit donate.travismanion.org/event/2022-thp-west-point-cemetary/e401228

Village of Warwick Memorial Day Parade: Warwick, N.Y.

The parade will start at 11:00 a.m. on Memorial Day at Village Hall on Main Street. It will proceed down Main Street to Oakland Avenue, then to Warwick Ceremony where there will be ceremonies to honor deceased military personnel. After the ceremonies, the parade will reform and proceed to St. Stephen’s Cemetery, where more ceremonies will be held. Then, the parade will continue down Forester Avenue to the Firemen’s Monument for ceremonies held by the Warwick Fire Department. The parade will end in Veterans Memorial Park where there will be refreshments.

Town of Tuxedo Memorial Day Parade: Tuxedo Park, N.Y.

The community parade will step off at 11:30 a.m., beginning at George F. Baker High School, then proceeding north on Rt. 17, stopping at the war memorial outside of the Tuxedo Park gate to lay wreathes. It will then continue to St. Mary’s church for closing ceremonies.

The Tuxedo Park Library 17th Annual Memorial Day Community Picnic: Tuxedo Park, N.Y.

The Tuxedo Park Library observes Memorial Day with their 17th Annual Community Picnic. At the event, a journal will be distributed that commemorates those community members who gave the supreme sacrifice while in service to our country. Picnic, entertainment and activities will be held from 12-2:30 p.m. They include DJ George Carney, a photo booth from Vision Reality 360, balloons by Matt Stevens, children’s crafts with Ms. Kara, food and games for all ages. Jester Jim will entertain all at 12:30 p.m., and raffle drawings for a wide variety of locally donated prizes will begin at 2:00 p.m. For more information on attending this event or purchasing raffle tickets, contact the Tuxedo Park Library at 845-351-2207. The library is located at 227 Route 17, Tuxedo Park, N.Y.

Goshen Memorial Day Parade and Services: Goshen, N.Y.

The Village of Goshen, along with Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1708 and American Legion Post 377, is hosting the Goshen Memorial Day Parade and Services. The Memorial Honor Guard services start at 7 a.m. at St. John’s Cemetery, proceeding to various cemeteries along the way. Parade line up begins 10 a.m. on Erie Street. The parade steps off at 11 a.m. Additional services will be held post parade at the Everett Memorial in Church Park.

Pennsylvania

Monday, May 30

Milford Memorial Day Parade: Milford, Pa.

Milford’s Annual Memorial Day Parade hosted by American Legion Post #139 steps off from Ann Street Park at 10:30 a.m., and continues to the veterans monument on Broad Street, arriving by 10:55 a.m.

Central Park Memorial Day Parade: Honesdale, Pa.

The annual Honesdale Memorial Day Parade commences at 10 a.m. at 5th St. and Main St., and will head north, turning onto 9th St. and ending at Central Park. Central Park Ceremonies will be held at 11 a.m., and ceremonies in Veterans Park start at 12 p.m.

Boys Lacrosse: Results, links and featured coverage for Wednesday, April 6

Wednesday, April 6The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. Featured CoverageNo. 3 Mountain Lakes 10, No. 12 Bergen Catholic 9Top 20 ScoreboardWednesday, Apr. 6Rancocas Valley 14, Cinnaminson 3 - Bo...

Wednesday, April 6

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday.

Featured Coverage

No. 3 Mountain Lakes 10, No. 12 Bergen Catholic 9

Top 20 Scoreboard

Wednesday, Apr. 6

Rancocas Valley 14, Cinnaminson 3 - Box Score

Delran 14, Camden Catholic 12 - Box Score

Immaculata 15, St. Joseph (Met.) 8 - Box Score

Gov. Livingston 12, Verona 8 - Box Score

Pompton Lakes 8, Bergen Tech 6 - Box Score

Sparta 9, Mount Olive 7 - Box Score

Pascack Hills 14, Paramus Catholic 7 - Box Score

Glen Rock 10, Ramsey 9 - Box Score

West Essex 16, Mendham 7 - Box Score

Boonton 12, Parsippany Hills 6 - Box Score

Mahwah 9, Paramus 6 - Box Score

Mountain Lakes 10, Bergen Catholic 9 - Box Score

Morristown-Beard 6, Cranford 5 - Box Score

Morris Hills 11, Morris Catholic 4 - Box Score

St. Joseph (Mont.) 9, Northern Highlands 8 - Box Score

Nutley 20, Dayton 12 - Box Score

Tenafly 11, Wayne Hills 6 - Box Score

Don Bosco Prep 17, Ramapo 3 - Box Score

Delran 14, Camden Catholic 12 - Box Score

Eastern 15, Washington Township 6 - Box Score

Red Bank Catholic 12, Holmdel 10 - Box Score

Manasquan 17, Jackson Liberty 3 - Box Score

Southern 11, Brick Memorial 2 - Box Score

Point Pleasant Boro 15, Donovan Catholic 5 - Box Score

Jackson Memorial 15, Toms River North 6 - Box Score

Middletown South 14, Freehold Township 6 - Box Score

Rumson-Fair Haven 14, Shore 3 - Box Score

Toms River South 16, Central Regional 2 - Box Score

Triton 11, Highland 3 - Box Score

Pingry 14, Ridge 4 - Box Score

Watchung Hills 12, Phillipsburg 5 - Box Score

Immaculata 15, St. Joseph (Met.) 8 - Box Score

Bridgewater-Raritan 12, North Hunterdon 4 - Box Score

Peddie 7, Blair 6 - Box Score

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now to be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care bout, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here.

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Highland, N.Y.: A Small Community With a ‘Feel-Good’ Spirit

Like other areas outside the city, this Ulster County hamlet got a boost from buyers during the pandemic. But some of the homes there are still relatively affordable.For years, Highland, N.Y., flew under the radar, seen less as a destination and more as a pass-through on the way to better-known cities like Poughkeepsie and New Paltz.But that changed in 2018, when a $5.4 million visitor center for the Walkway Over the Hudson opened on the Highland side of the river. More than 650,000 people traversed the walkway connecting Pough...

Like other areas outside the city, this Ulster County hamlet got a boost from buyers during the pandemic. But some of the homes there are still relatively affordable.

For years, Highland, N.Y., flew under the radar, seen less as a destination and more as a pass-through on the way to better-known cities like Poughkeepsie and New Paltz.

But that changed in 2018, when a $5.4 million visitor center for the Walkway Over the Hudson opened on the Highland side of the river. More than 650,000 people traversed the walkway connecting Poughkeepsie and this five-square-mile Ulster County hamlet last year, and with the visitor center and nearby restaurants, they had a reason to linger on the Highland side.

Highland’s population grew by 13 percent from 2010 to 2020 — to 6,385 from 5,647, according to census figures — and that growth has continued apace since the pandemic started in 2020, thanks mostly to New York City residents seeking more space at relatively affordable prices.

Kateryna Zemskova, 42, and her husband, Baris Tuncer, 47, looked at houses in New Paltz, Gardiner and Woodstock before finding what they wanted in Highland: a spacious home for less than $400,000, with a separate apartment for Ms. Zemskova’s mother. The couple, who are real estate agents in New York City, closed on the brick ranch house for $385,000 late last year. “Within our budget, we only saw that kind of mother-daughter situation in Highland,” Ms. Zemskova said.

Avid hikers, they also wanted to be close to Minnewaska State Park Preserve and the Mohonk Preserve, as well as the Mountain Laurel Waldorf School in New Paltz, where they enrolled their 4-year-old daughter. (The couple, who still own an apartment in Midwood, Brooklyn, are splitting their time between Highland and the city.) “The house is accessible, but it’s quiet at the same time,” Ms. Zemskova said.

Alanna Henneberry, the director of outreach for the nonprofit Holistic Health Community, in nearby Stone Ridge, N.Y., has a similar feeling about Highland.

“I’ve lived in Poughkeepsie and Kingston, but I’ve always come back to this area because I like what it has to offer,” she said. “You’re closer to the city, you’re closer to Poughkeepsie, and yet I still have the woods and the farm-y feel of raising chickens and bees.”

Ms. Henneberry, 37, lives in the 3,600-square-foot farmhouse that her parents built in Highland two decades ago, sharing it with her mother, Peggy Henneberry, and her husband of several months, Richard Smykowski, 45, a designer for YouTube.

Mr. Smykowski was living in Kingston before he and Ms. Henneberry married, but “Highland is small,” he said, “and it’s easier to get to know the community.”

He is in contract to buy a pair of commercial buildings that he plans to lease. His agent, Elizabeth Decker, who owns Hello Dolly Real Estate, said she has “been doing this for over 40 years in this same area” and has “never seen such demand or such a rise in prices.”

That’s true not just for commercial real estate in Highland: As in other areas outside New York City, residential inventory has been low since the pandemic, and competition for homes fierce.

“The problem is no one wants to leave Highland,” said Dawn Passante, an associate broker with Coldwell Banker Village Green Realty, who moved to Highland from Queens with her parents when she was 12. “There is a saying among the locals that once you live in Highland, you stay in Highland. When Covid hit, houses were selling virtually, without the buyers physically seeing them, and most offers were cash and for above asking price.”

Ms. Passante, who said she sold 30 homes in Highland in 2020 and 2021 combined, compared with 18 in 2018 and 2019, noted that proximity to the Metro-North Railroad in Poughkeepsie and the New York State Thruway has been a strong selling point, although many buyers are still working remotely. Recently, she has been seeing local buyers lose out to buyers from the city with cash.

It’s a far cry from the situation in 1998, when Jessica Stirberg and her wife bought a 2,000-square-foot antique farmhouse for less than $200,000. “We were more interested in New Paltz, but we fell in love with this house,” said Ms. Stirberg, 52, the assistant director for a child-care center. “It’s on the border between New Paltz and Highland, and the town and school taxes are more affordable.”

Ms. Stirberg enjoys Highland’s outdoor attractions, like Franny Reese State Park and the John Burroughs Nature Sanctuary, but wishes the hamlet were as progressive as New Paltz. “When I’m in the tractor-supply store,” she said, “I don’t get an easy feeling that I’m going to strike up a conversation or share a joke.”

What You’ll Find

Highland sits between Poughkeepsie to the east, just over the mid-Hudson Bridge, and New Paltz to the west, off Exit 18, offering convenience in a rural setting.

The hamlet lies within the 31-square-mile town of Lloyd, but many Highland addresses and landmarks fall outside the boundaries designated by the Census Bureau. And to confuse matters further, locals tend to use the names Lloyd and Highland interchangeably, often referring to the entire town as Highland.

The housing is a mix of ranches, split-levels, farmhouses and contemporary homes, with spacious Victorians lining Vineyard Avenue, near the central business district. Homes along bucolic Bellevue Road are set high on the bluffs overlooking the Hudson — a view that comes with a higher price tag. Crescent Avenue is known for its rambling old farmhouses. And just off Route 9W is a new 16-acre rental development called Hudson Place, with 72 units in 12 buildings and a trail leading to the Walkway Over the Hudson.

Highland’s business district is dotted with bistros, galleries and cafes that have sprung up in recent years, housed in quaint turn-of-the-20th-century buildings. Underground Coffee & Ales has a broad selection of craft beers on tap. Vigneto Café specializes in made-to-order Italian dishes prepared with locally grown organic ingredients. At the art gallery Studio 89, which opened last May, Amy Dooley, the owner, recruited Lady Pink, a local graffiti artist, to paint a splashy mural on the side of the building. Another recent addition, Knaus Gallery & Wine Bar, serves wine and light meals with its art and pottery.

What You’ll Pay

Many local buyers start their searches in trendier areas, like New Paltz or Woodstock, but end up in Highland when they discover they can get more for their money.

While specific data isn’t available for the hamlet of Highland, the median price for the 79 homes that sold in the town of Lloyd during the past 12 months was $369,900, a 19 percent increase from the median of $310,000 for the 90 homes that sold over the preceding 12 months, according to data from the Ulster County Board of Realtors. (In 2019, before the pandemic, 70 houses sold for a median of $253,250.) But that’s still more affordable than homes in many neighboring towns, including New Paltz, where the median sale price over the past 12 months was $415,000.

The typical Highland homeowner pays about $10,000 in annual town and school taxes, according to the town assessor’s office.

The Vibe

“Highland has always had a very small-town community spirit,” said Frederick Pizzuto, a former supervisor for the town of Lloyd and a lifelong Highland resident. “You cross the bridge from Poughkeepsie, and you definitely feel a different pace.”

At dusk in warm weather, children compete on the baseball fields at Tony Williams Park, while teens shoot hoops and their parents lob tennis balls on adjoining courts. The 7.1-mile Hudson Valley Rail Trail, running alongside the park, draws a steady stream of walkers, joggers and cyclists. Completed in 2019, the trail provides a pedestrian pathway from Highland to the Walkway and the 13-mile Dutchess Rail Trail on the Poughkeepsie side of the Hudson River.

In May and October, the Walkway holds outdoor farmers’ and makers’ markets near the Highland approach. Other outdoor activities include apple picking at local orchards, kayaking in Black Creek, swimming in the lake at Berean Park, and hiking at Illinois Mountain and Franny Reese State Park.

“Why wouldn’t you want to stay in a town like this?” said Jami Anson, the director of special events for the Walkway, whose family has lived in Highland for seven generations. “You have the beautiful views, the fantastic events in the area, you have culture, you have art, you have nature, and you have that feel-good community spirit.”

The Schools

The Highland Central School District serves a diverse population of nearly 1,700 students, with an elementary school, a middle school and a high school. According to the New York State Education Department, in 2020-21, 70 percent of the district’s students identified as white, 14 percent as Latino, 7 percent as Black, 5 percent as multiracial and 4 percent as Asian or Pacific Islander.

On 2018-19 state tests, 88 percent of Highland High School students were proficient in English, compared with a statewide average of 84 percent, and 75 percent were proficient in geometry, compared with 70 percent statewide. In 2021, the school had a 97 percent graduation rate, compared with 86 percent statewide.

The Commute

The town is about a mile from Exit 18 on the New York State Thruway (Interstate 87) and minutes from Poughkeepsie, via the Mid-Hudson Bridge. Driving to Midtown Manhattan can take two hours or more, depending on traffic.

Some residents prefer to leave the driving to Trailways, which offers bus service from New Paltz to New York City during weekday rush hours, for a round-trip fare of $47.50. The bus stops at the Main Street terminal and at the park-and-ride lot by Exit 18.

Others avoid the roads altogether and hop on a Metro-North train in Poughkeepsie; the round-trip fare to Manhattan during peak hours is $51.50, and a monthly pass is $521. Monthly parking passes are available for about $47.

The History

The town of Lloyd was settled in 1754 by Anthony Yelverton, a Poughkeepsie resident who started a ferry service between Highland and Poughkeepsie, according to the book “Highland and the Town of Lloyd,” by Ethan P. Jackman. Yelverton built a house on Maple Avenue that is believed to be the oldest wooden structure in Highland. Known as Yelverton’s Landing, the riverfront area — where farmers once brought cheese, butter and livestock to be shipped to New York City — is now the site of the small Bob Shepard Highland Landing Park.

As settlers sought less-rocky inland sites, and the town center moved away from the increasingly industrial riverfront, the hamlet gained its name: High Land. Lloyd was officially formed by the New York State Legislature from the town of New Paltz in 1845, according to the Town of Lloyd Historical Preservation Society. Commerce and passenger travel took off in the 1880s and 1890s, with the completion of several regional railroads and the Poughkeepsie-Highland Railroad Bridge, now known as the Walkway Over the Hudson.

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