HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Manville, NJ

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HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Manville, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Manville, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Manville, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Manville, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Manville, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Manville, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Manville, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Manville, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Manville, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Manville, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Manville, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Manville, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Manville, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Manville, NJ

'No one is helping Manville': Mayor blames 'overdevelopment' for devastating floods

SOMERVILLE – Manville Mayor Richard Onderko is mad and he's not going to take it anymore.The mayor started his crusade against what he called "overdevelopment" in Somerset County by visiting the Somerville Borough Council on Monday to tell its members that construction in the county has led to catastrophic flooding in his hometown, at the confluence of the Raritan and Millstone rivers."I am not happy when I see my citizens suffer," he said, adding he will bring his message to all of Some...

SOMERVILLE – Manville Mayor Richard Onderko is mad and he's not going to take it anymore.

The mayor started his crusade against what he called "overdevelopment" in Somerset County by visiting the Somerville Borough Council on Monday to tell its members that construction in the county has led to catastrophic flooding in his hometown, at the confluence of the Raritan and Millstone rivers.

"I am not happy when I see my citizens suffer," he said, adding he will bring his message to all of Somerset County's 21 municipalities.

Though Onderko said he is a believer in climate change, he argued that stormwater from construction in the county ends up on the streets of Manville and exacerbates flooding.

"Where is all that stormwater going to go?" he said. "It's going to Manville."

Manville suffered record-breaking flooding in September after the remnants of Hurricane Ida dumped 11 inches of rain in a few hours on Central Jersey.

The storm left 2 feet of water in Manville's municipal complex on North Main Street, and last month the Borough Council awarded a $274,000 contract for repairs.

"I believe overdevelopment is going to be a big problem for Somerset County," Onderko said, urging the county to create a stormwater utility.

According to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, a stormwater utility is one that assesses fees and uses the revenue to maintain infrastructure that controls stormwater flooding and reduces pollutants from entering waterbodies.

"All 21 towns need to participate to try to confront climate change," he said, adding that stormwater infrastructure needs to be retrofitted.

"There are so many areas in our county that have no stormwater retention. They just pump it into the river," Onderko said. "I know we can do better."

Though the mayor pointed to the residential construction by the Somerville train station as an example of overdevelopment, Onderko told the council, "you're not the only town that sends its stormwater to Manville. I get it from Hillsborough and other places."

Onderko opposed a 174-home development on half of Royce Brook Golf Course in Hillsborough. That project was passed by the township's Planning Board last week as part of Hillsborough's affordable housing court settlement.

He also questioned the construction of apartments in Somerville and other Somerset County towns.

"I don't understand why everybody wants these high-priced apartments," he said.

Avalon Bay, the developer of the apartments by the train station in Somerville, has started advertising 438-square-foot studio apartments for $1,645 per month, plus a $60 to $90 monthly fee for parking, $60 monthly fee for a dog or cat and a $550 move-in fee for amenities.

"When I got married, I just wanted a house with a small lawn," he said. "The American Dream has changed."

Onderko also expressed frustration that nothing has been done to prevent more flooding.

"I'm tired of hearing a lot of talk about ‘we're going to do something to help Manville,’” he said. "Let me tell something – no one is helping Manville."

Some residents displaced by the Ida floods are still living in their cars, the mayor said. "And they have no hope of when they're going to get aid," he said, adding he has yet to get a definite answer when the money is coming.

Manville, South Brunswick and other municipalities in the Millstone River watershed have passed a resolution asking the DEP to find a solution to the flooding.

After Hurricane Irene devastated Manville with floodwaters in 2011, "we took our eyes off the ball," Onderko said. Though a Millstone River Flood Commission was created, it "fell apart," he said.

"I don't know how we stop it," Onderko said.

Email: [email protected]

Mike Deak is a reporter for mycentraljersey.com. To get unlimited access to his articles on Somerset and Hunterdon counties, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Homes, banquet hall burn to ground in Manville as flooded roads block firefighters

At least three fires continue to burn and smolder Friday morning in the flood-ravaged town of Manville with streets still overrun by water, causing access issues for firefighters and first responders.Two houses and a banquet hall in Manville were still visibly burning Friday morning as news helicopters circled overhead. Abc7ny.com reported, ...

At least three fires continue to burn and smolder Friday morning in the flood-ravaged town of Manville with streets still overrun by water, causing access issues for firefighters and first responders.

Two houses and a banquet hall in Manville were still visibly burning Friday morning as news helicopters circled overhead. Abc7ny.com reported, The Saffron, a banquet hall on South Main Street, burst into flames at around 2 a.m. Residents from as far as neighboring towns claim they heard a loud explosion, the report said.

Video showed The Saffron completely surrounded by flood waters.

Jayesh Mehta, the owner of The Saffron, has only seen the flames and flooding in pictures and videos shared by neighbors, he told NJ Advance Media on Friday morning. The feeling of powerlessness as the business he’s owned since June 2018 burns has left Mehta in a state of shock.

“I don’t know what to do and how to deal with something like this,” said Mehta. “I haven’t had any such disasters like that in my life. Until when it was flooded and the water was inside, I was okay. I knew I had to repair it and fix it. Now, I don’t know. Something like this has never happened to me. I don’t know how to deal with it. I’ve had a sleepless night.”

Mehta, who lives in Edison, has been unable to reach his business, blocked by flood waters on all sides, he said. Events were scheduled at the banquet hall Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, he said. As soon as he’s able to, Mehta plans to go to The Saffron to assess the damage, he said.

The fires in Manville started on Thursday afternoon when Raritan River flooding still blocked many of roads in town. The river has started to recede below moderate flood stage on Friday morning, but access issues remain.

A house on North Second Avenue and another on Boesel Avenue continued to burn Friday, ABC7ny.com reported.

In the wake of torrential flooding and fires that incinerated houses in Manville, the streets were eerily quiet Friday morning, punctuated only by the intermittent, piercing sound of fire alarms from homes. A sopping wet stuffed toy was left alone in the street, likely swept away by flooding or lost amid the rush to escape.

One house was little more than a pile of splinters and ashes, still smoldering, with a lone pumpkin’s orange standing out amid the grey and black.

Outside his Lost Valley home, Pete Nguyen was cleaning up, used to floods, but not the severity of those that swept through his neighborhood Wednesday night.

“It’s happened twice before,” Nguyen said. “We have to do what we have to do.”

Nguyen, who’s lived in the home for 12 years wasn’t home when the flooding happened, blocked from getting back by the rising flood waters. While Nguyen and his family didn’t lose as much as many others and he wanted to stay in his home, he was worried that it would soon become unsustainable to live in his home, with repair costs and taxes continuing to be a financial burden.

“A lot of people moved out, so our taxes jumped up — we used to pay $7,000 and it went up over $10,000 now,” he said. “More people move… I don’t want to think about it. It’s the worst thing.”

Jose Mercado also lives in the Lost Valley, at the edge of a park, in a home with his girlfriend, her mother and her nephew. He’d lived in the neighborhood only two years and had already seen his fair share of floods. It was familiar to him, he said. Simply, a part of living where he did. But Wednesday night was different, he said. It was worse.

“This type of flood hasn’t happened in over 100 years,” said Mercado. “We’ve had them before, but not like this before. This time was worse than Floyd. We were aware but we didn’t know things were going to be this bad.”

Mercado’s house was built in 1999, with a foundation made of brick, constructed to withstand the flood waters that houses along the Raritan River are often exposed to. Mercado and his family were safe on the second floor of the house, but sheet rock and furniture needs to be replaced, he said. Ultimately, Mercado was relieved that only material things were lost amid storms that cost 25 people in New Jersey their lives.

“They’re just material things,” he said. “Family is all fine, which is the most important thing.”

Similar to Nguyen, Mercado hoped the flooding and the cost of repairs wouldn’t force him to move.

“I hope I won’t have to leave, the town won’t give you anything or the state, really,” he said. “And it’s a nice house.”

“Climate change is getting worse and worse,” he added. “It’s been crazy what’s going on for the past five years. There’s so much stuff going on on Earth now.”

Manville was devastated by flooding brought on by the remnants of Hurricane Ida overnight Wednesday.

The Raritan River, which hit 26.85 feet at 6 a.m Wednesday in Manville, more than 12 feet over its flood stage of 14 feet.

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After devastating flooding, Manville football gives town hope

None of Manville’s players knew the words to the cheer, but it didn’t matter. They bounced along with their cheerleaders, using their helmets as pom poms, as the band blasted out a happy melody for a downtrodden town.For the first time since 2006, Manville won its first game of the football season, but this wasn’t a win for the group of 25 players or the team’s coaches.It was for a town still reeling from ...

None of Manville’s players knew the words to the cheer, but it didn’t matter. They bounced along with their cheerleaders, using their helmets as pom poms, as the band blasted out a happy melody for a downtrodden town.

For the first time since 2006, Manville won its first game of the football season, but this wasn’t a win for the group of 25 players or the team’s coaches.

It was for a town still reeling from devastating flooding that rocked the blue-collar Somerset County town. Manville needed a distraction and got one from its football team Friday night.

“The community took a hit, but we came together as a family and gave them a little hope,” said junior Shawn Purcell, who had four touchdowns in a 48-6 win over Dunellen in what was supposed to be Manville’s first home game on its new turf field.

Instead, the team’s busses pulled through a gate and onto North 9th Street, two blocks from the school, where piles of debris lined the streets waiting to be hauled off.

Water-soaked couches, washer machines covered in mud, the piles grew higher as the bus ran parallel to the Raritan River.

They arrived at Dunellen’s Columbia Park as visitors.

Manville was forced to cancel last week’s game against Belvidere as a direct result of the storm. Players spent the next week going house to house to help teammates clear out their flooded homes.

Coaches from multiple Manville teams loaded 600 cases of water into trucks and drove through the town’s worst-hit areas as players ran packs of plastic up to front doors. Players hauled debris instead of practicing, until Wednesday when the football team returned to the field for the first time since the storm hit a week earlier.

“It’s going to take a while to rebuild from this, but we’ll come back just like the way our football team came back tonight on short notice and performed very, very well,” Manville coach Pat Gorbatuk said after the win.

Manville scored three times on its first seven plays. Purcell, a 5-11 tailback, broke a 51-yard touchdown run on the second play from scrimmage. The junior then ran for a 56-yard score on Manville’s second possession and then hauled in a one-handed grab for a 33-yard score to put Manville up 21-0 halfway through the first quarter.

Purcell, who racked up over 200 yards of offense in the first half, was one of the water boys earlier in the week. By the end, he was the face of a team rallying a community.

“We’ve had a lot of things not go our way lately,” Gorbatuk said. “It’s just nice to give them something to cheer about.”

The trip to Dunellen was a reminder that Friday’s game was a temporary relief from their up-rooted lives. Multiple players were displaced.

“This was just a big thank you,” said senior quarterback Danny Wildgoose. “We want to thank them for being strong and not breaking down. They were strong. Manville strong.”

Gorbatuk, a Manville graduate, urged his players to not take Friday’s game for granted. His senior year started with two losses after Manville flooded during Hurricane Floyd in 1999. The games counted as forfeits.

“I didn’t get this opportunity,” Gorbatuk said at the start of his pre-game speech.

His players did, however. They capitalized.

“This means everything right now,” junior Geoffrey Mathis, a two-way lineman, said. “The least we could do is go out there, try our best and give the community something to look forward to every week.”

The message will be the same next week when Manville returns home for the first time.

And this time, the players will have the community behind them.

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Patrick Lanni may be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @PatLanniHS and like his Facebook page.

Manville still cleaning up months after Ida: 'The biggest help has been the community'

MANVILLE – It's a town of survivors.Manville, trapped in the vise of the Millstone and Raritan rivers, has been ravaged by floods in 1999 from Hurricane Floyd, in 2011 from Hurricane Irene and other less catastrophic floods.And after every one of those floods, Manville residents and businesses bounced back with rare resilience and a stubborn hope for better days.But when the remnants of Hurricane Ida swept through Central Jersey with record rainfall and flooding more than two months ago, that persist...

MANVILLE – It's a town of survivors.

Manville, trapped in the vise of the Millstone and Raritan rivers, has been ravaged by floods in 1999 from Hurricane Floyd, in 2011 from Hurricane Irene and other less catastrophic floods.

And after every one of those floods, Manville residents and businesses bounced back with rare resilience and a stubborn hope for better days.

But when the remnants of Hurricane Ida swept through Central Jersey with record rainfall and flooding more than two months ago, that persistence faced its toughest test.

But Manville residents are passing the test.

Residents of the Lost Valley section, which suffered the brunt of its flooding from the Millstone River, are still cleaning up their neighborhood, with water-damaged belongings still piled along the curb.

Most, including Jim Weaver, said the biggest help in their recovery has been the borough's unbeatable sense of community.

"Everybody takes it in stride around here," said Weaver, who has lived on Huff Avenue for four decades. "We're used to the routine."

Weaver said he used to be a plumber and has been using his skills to help his neighbors.

"I was helping out with the gas lines and getting furnaces ready," he said. “The community has really been the biggest help in the recovery."

Weaver's sentiments were echoed by fellow Lost Valley residents.

"The neighbors, neighborhood organizations and people dropping off cleaning supplies or other items have been a huge help in recovery," said Ivette Aponte, who lives on Boesel Avenue with Jose Mercado.

"People responding to online posts or having barbecues or just driving by and dropping things off (have been huge)," she said.

Aponte said, though, they are still waiting for approval to start repairs on their home.

In other parts of the borough, businesses are trying to get back to normal.

Adam’s Pizza on South Main Street is only a few weeks from reopening, though not without issues caused by the pandemic.

"It's going to take a little longer than expected because everything is overpriced and (hard to find)," said Adam Gamal, son of Abdul Gamal who owns the restaurant.

"The biggest help has been the community," Gamal said. "We had a lot of our own customers come through and help us."

"Hopefully another two weeks and we should be up and running," Gamal said.

Email: [email protected]

Alexander Lewis is an award-winning reporter and photojournalist whose work spans many topics. This coverage is only possible with support from our readers. Sign up today for a digital subscription.

Manville, South Brunswick and Princeton share this important goal

Manville and South Brunswick have little in common.Manville is a working-class town in Somerset County, and South Brunswick is a thriving suburb in the Route 1 corridor in Middlesex County near Princeton.Yet the two municipalities share an important goal: they – and other towns – want the state to find a solution to flooding in the 238-square-mile Millstone River Basin.The Millstone River has its headwaters in Millstone Township in Monmouth County, and it meanders through northern Mercer County...

Manville and South Brunswick have little in common.

Manville is a working-class town in Somerset County, and South Brunswick is a thriving suburb in the Route 1 corridor in Middlesex County near Princeton.

Yet the two municipalities share an important goal: they – and other towns – want the state to find a solution to flooding in the 238-square-mile Millstone River Basin.

The Millstone River has its headwaters in Millstone Township in Monmouth County, and it meanders through northern Mercer County near Princeton, then north through Somerset County to its confluence with the Raritan River.

Most of the year the Millstone is a ribbon of tranquility through rapidly developing Central Jersey. But then there are days, like Sept. 1, 2021, when the river becomes a raging torrent, threatening communities along its banks, particularly Manville that has suffered periodic devastating floods dating back to 1971.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is aware of the problem, saying that rapid development in the watershed is increasing runoff potential and flooding hazards. Many areas that historically have not seen flooding are now reporting damage during severe rainfall events, such as the remnants from Hurricane Ida last year.

The runoff from residential, office and retail development in the Route 1 corridor eventually ends up in Manville.

But in 2016, the Army Corps of Engineers released a report saying that it would not undertake a comprehensive flood control project in the watershed. The report concluded the benefit-to-cost ratio did not justify a flood control project like the one still under construction in the nearby Green Brook basin.

The reaction from Manville residents was understandable and predictable.

"You're the Army Corps of Idiots," Bob Kaminski, a resident of Manville's Lost Valley neighborhood, told representatives of the government organization at a community meeting where the report was unveiled.

"This is a man-made problem," Manville Mayor Rich Onderko said at the meeting. "There should be a man-made solution."

Now other towns besides Manville are recognizing that something must be done.

South Brunswick, like Manville, recently approved a resolution calling on the state to seek a regional solution to the flooding. The resolution also calls on other towns in the watershed to support the call for action.

In its resolution, South Brunswick says flooding "impacts not only our own residents and businesses, but limits access to regional transportation at Princeton Junction Train Station on the Northeast Corridor and to major state arteries such as U.S. Route 1" and creates public health and safety issues "that severely stretch our First Responders, and have resulted in injury and death in the region, far outweighing the direct economic impacts."

Princeton has also passed a resolution, saying "even less storms tax our storm sewer stream and cause our streams to overflow their banks."

The resolution says the flooding is "a multi-county regional problem that cannot be alleviated by independent action of any one municipality."

Neighboring West Windsor has also adopted the resolution.

The resolutions also ask all towns in the watershed to ask the state to take action.

Email: [email protected]

Susan Loyer covers Middlesex County and more for MyCentralJersey.com. To get unlimited access to her work, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

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