HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Ramsey, NJ

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HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Ramsey, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Ramsey, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Ramsey, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Ramsey, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Ramsey, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Ramsey, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Ramsey, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Ramsey, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Ramsey, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Ramsey, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Ramsey, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Ramsey, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Ramsey, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When there is an increased concentration of growth hormone by the pituitary gland, there are positive benefits to the body. Some benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Ramsey, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Ramsey, NJ

Don Bosco football headed back to MetLife Stadium after big semifinal win

RAMSEY − Don Bosco was the better team under dry conditions, and downright dominant in the snow.The Ironmen pushed past Seton Hall Prep, 48-14, Friday night in a Non-Public A football semifinal during which snow began falling midway through the second quarter.Don Bosco (9-2) led 13-7 before the first flake appeared, and was so dominant thereafter that that New Jersey's top-ranked team reached a 33-point lead to trigger a running clock."It definitely got everybody all juiced up, it got the fans j...

RAMSEY − Don Bosco was the better team under dry conditions, and downright dominant in the snow.

The Ironmen pushed past Seton Hall Prep, 48-14, Friday night in a Non-Public A football semifinal during which snow began falling midway through the second quarter.

Don Bosco (9-2) led 13-7 before the first flake appeared, and was so dominant thereafter that that New Jersey's top-ranked team reached a 33-point lead to trigger a running clock.

"It definitely got everybody all juiced up, it got the fans juiced up, and that helped us," Don Bosco coach Dan Sabella said of the snow.

The Ironmen scored on seven of eight possessions, including the last five, and all seven touchdowns came on runs. They totaled 445 total yards.

Don Bosco senior running back Ronnie Heath and senior Nick Minicucci each ran for two TDs, one in each half.

Junior Logan Bush, sophomore Nolan James, and sophomore Jayden Richards each ran for one score.

Seton Hall (6-6) led 7-0 by scoring on the opening possession, a 29-yard run by senior Darren Burton. The Pirates scored in the fourth on senior Andrew Daly's 5-yard run.

"I thought we played really good football other than that first drive where they took it down on us," Sabella said. "That's never the way you want to start the game, obviously, but our offense answered back."

What it means

Don Bosco advances to the NJSIAA Non-Public A on Black Friday at 6 p.m. at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, and will face the winner of Saturday's semifinal between Bergen Catholic and Delbarton.

"We've got one more to focus on," Sabella said. "We've got one more that we want to go get."

Key drive

Don Bosco took the second-half kickoff and marched for a TD in the snow to open a comfortable 27-7 lead.

The Ironmen began possession on their 20-yard line and the 11-play drive culminated with James scoring on an 11-yard run at 6:04 of the third.

"It snowed, the offensive line played amazing, the team energy was amazing, and the defense played great," All-New Jersey senior lineman Chase Bisontis said. "So my last [home] game as a senior was just an amazing feeling."

By the numbers

Don Bosco dominated the line of scrimmage and earned its 455 yards on 55 plays. The Ironmen picked up 24 first downs and the only possession they didn't score on ended with a fumble.

James carried 15 times for 159 yards, while Bush rushed 15 times for 146 yards. Heath carried six times for 27 yards.

Minicucci ran nine times for 65 yards and kept the offense balanced by going 6-for-8 for 57 yards.

"When we needed to throw, we threw," Minicucci said. "And we ran the ball great. Our line had a great push, and we've got three great backs, and they just took care of it. And that line is special, really special."

Seton Hall had 296 yards. Junior quarterback Liam Londergan was 15-for-28 for 154 and ran for a team-high 50 yards on six carries.

They said it

"The snow was kind of cool - I'm not going to lie - and it came out of nowhere," Minicucci said. "I was kind of worried a little bit, because I've never played in a snow game, and I knew we had to run the heck out of the ball because it was going to be wet."

Boys Soccer: No. 10 Ramsey holds off Pascack Valley’s late surge for N1G2 title

Everything seemed to be slipping away from Ramsey, No. 10 in the NJ.com Top 20.After scoring an early goal to take the lead, that lead evaporated midway through the second half, and Pascack Valley made its biggest push to take the lead.But all it took was one play for Ramsey to assume control once again.Lucas Chung’s cross found Jason Balbuena open at the far post, and the senior buried his second goal of the game on a header. Just like that, Ramsey was back in the lead.Nineteen minutes later, it celebrated ...

Everything seemed to be slipping away from Ramsey, No. 10 in the NJ.com Top 20.

After scoring an early goal to take the lead, that lead evaporated midway through the second half, and Pascack Valley made its biggest push to take the lead.

But all it took was one play for Ramsey to assume control once again.

Lucas Chung’s cross found Jason Balbuena open at the far post, and the senior buried his second goal of the game on a header. Just like that, Ramsey was back in the lead.

Nineteen minutes later, it celebrated its third-straight sectional title.

The top-seeded Rams outlasted third-seeded Pascack Valley, 2-1, to win the North 1, Group 2 title in Ramsey.

“In the second half we came out strong, they scored that first goal and they were kind of all over us,” Patrick Weir said. “I just told the boys to settle down and play our game. If we play like we can, we’ll be able to create chances.”

Balbuena gave Ramsey (19-2) the lead in the fourth minute off of a cross from Kiran Dewan, and that lead held up through halftime, as both teams spent much of the half in the midfield.

But like any team that is trailing in a game of the magnitude of a sectional final, Pascack Valley made its push.

It forced Ramsey’s sophomore goalkeeper Steven De Pinto to make several key saves, including an impressive back-to-back sequence on Adrian Pilet just before Pascack Valley tied it up.

Pascack Valley tied the game in the 57th minute, as Pilet’s corner was hit into the back of the net by Michael Criscuolo. The following four minutes saw it push for the go-ahead goal, as it spent almost all of that time in the attacking end, pressing Ramsey’s back line and goalkeeper.

“We said at halftime that we wanted to run the play more,” Pascack Valley coach Luciano Cofrancesco said. “I thought we did that. I thought the boys had a great second half and we were pushing forward and moving numbers up. Unfortunately we got a exposed a little bit in the back, and that’s how they came to their second one.”

Ramsey’s Carson Deas, who had a strong game on the back line, took the ball upfield into the attacking end, and found Lucas Chung on the right side. Chung then crossed it to Balbuena, who finished it off to give his team the lead for good.

“Chung is amazing with those diagnoal balls into the box. I’m just there to finish them,” Balbuena said. “It was huge. We scored first, then they bounced back like they team they are, hard-working. But we passed the ball well and we scored the second goal.”

Ramsey will move on to the Group 2 semifinals on Wednesday, where it will take on Harrison as it looks to return to the state title game after losing, 2-1, to Delran in last year’s final.

“We know we want to get back to the state final,” Weir said. “That’s the goal we set at the beginning of the season. We just want to win it for them and for us, and we’ve been working so hard since July.”

Pascack Valley on the other hand, saw its season end with a 14-4-2 record. It won the North 1, Group 3 title last fall, and although it ultimately fell short of another sectional title, it has much to be proud of.

“This team is special,” Cofrancesco said. “They worked really hard day-in and day-out. From the program last year into this year, they do everything that they need to. They’re unselfish, and they’re just a great group of young men, and really great to coach.”

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Ramsey football holds off Bernards for first playoff win since 2011

RAMSEY − The pain lasted in Ramsey for 357 days.Last season, the Rams went undefeated in the regular season and were the top seed in their sectional bracket before being upset by Hanover Park in the first round. On Friday, fourth-seeded Ramsey got a win in the playoffs, defeating fifth-seeded Bernards, 35-21, in the North 2, Group 2 quarterfinals. The win helped heal the pain from last season and erased an 11-year absence from the second round of the playoffs."Tonight was important," Ramsey coach ...

RAMSEY − The pain lasted in Ramsey for 357 days.

Last season, the Rams went undefeated in the regular season and were the top seed in their sectional bracket before being upset by Hanover Park in the first round. On Friday, fourth-seeded Ramsey got a win in the playoffs, defeating fifth-seeded Bernards, 35-21, in the North 2, Group 2 quarterfinals. The win helped heal the pain from last season and erased an 11-year absence from the second round of the playoffs.

"Tonight was important," Ramsey coach Adam Baeira said. "I feel for the seniors from last season and I credit the guys who went through it last season. Last year, the season got cut short and it took a year to get back here. They played with a chip on their shoulder and played a hell of a game."

Junior Luca Gemma and senior Robert Fuerst, who were both a part of that playoff loss a season ago, combined for all five rushing touchdowns for the Rams.

On the Rams' second drive, Fuerst dove to the 1-yard line and had his helmet ripped off. By rule, he left the field for one play and Gemma took a direct snap for the game’s first touchdown and the first points allowed by Bernards since Sept. 23 at Delaware Valley.

Check out the photo gallery, then continue reading.

"We just played for each other tonight," said Fuerst. "The offensive line blocked well all night and we all ran hard. We all just want to succeed for one another. It's as simple as that."

Bernards answered in the second quarter as Connor Laverty found Enzo Britez for a 23-yard touchdown grab to tie the game 7-7. Gemma got his second rushing touchdown from a yard out to put Ramsey back up, 14-7, but Bernards responded again. Laverty found Nicky Koulfie for a screen pass that went for a 39-yard touchdown and a tie game.

Fuerst found the end zone with a 10-yard scamper with 17 seconds left in the half to take a 21-14 lead into halftime. Despite penalties on their opening drive of the second half moving them back to their own 5-yard line, the Rams scored once more as Fuerst ran into the end zone from 12 yards out.

"Having the success we had with the option tonight opens up a whole new area of our offense," Fuerst said. "We have terrific receivers and great running backs, so if I am able to have good runs as well, it's just one more guy out there with the ball for them to worry about."

In the fourth quarter, Gemma put the game away with a 34-yard rushing touchdown to give Ramsey a 35-14 lead. Gemma, who missed time earlier this season with a shoulder injury, battled through pain all night from the residual damage taken throughout the season.

"I don't feel too great, but injuries happen and nobody really feels 100 percent at this time of the year," Gemma said. "I'll do whatever I can to try and help us win and go as far as we can."

What it means

Ramsey last won a playoff game when it beat Hopatcong in the North 1, Group 2 quarterfinals in 2011. The Rams move on to the sectional semifinals next week and keep their season going.

"You want to go as far as you can and every win you can get one step closer to the goal," Gemma said. "Last year was a wake-up call for us because we were 8-0 but we were not prepared for the playoffs. We're ready now and we're ready to go."

It also spells the end of the line for Bernards, which had not lost since Sept. 2 and entered the playoffs on a seven-game win streak.

By the numbers

235-14: The Mountaineers had scored points in bunches while shutting out opponents and outscoring them 235-14 during their win streak. In their only other loss this season, a defeat in September to Hillside, they also gave up 35 points.

331: Ramsey scored 294 points in the regular season and eclipsed the 300 mark in Friday's victory. The season total of 331 points scored is currently the fourth-highest scoring season in Ramsey football history. The Rams would need 31 points to tie the school record for points in a season, which they set last season.

Key play

Leading by two touchdowns and seeking to put the game away in the third quarter, Ramsey drove near the Bernards end zone before fumbling short of the goal line. It was recovered in the end zone by Bernards for a touchback, allowing the Mountaineers to try and cut the lead in half. A deep throw by Connor Laverty was hauled in by senior Xavier Futrell, who returned it to the Ramsey 40-yard line.

"In every game, there's three or four plays that define the game," Baeira said. "That play might have been as big as the other ones put together. It snatched momentum back and we really fed off of that play."

Ramsey held on to possession until the start of the fourth quarter, when Gemma broke a long run for his third touchdown of the night and made the deficit too large for Bernards to overcome.

They said it

"That's a hell of a good team in Bernards. They always play well and they're always in the playoffs. We saw them in the bracket next to us and knew we had to bring it against them and we did it." − Baeira.

"Luca is the toughest kid I know. He would play out there with a broken leg if they'd let him. It sparks us seeing him out there still dealing with his shoulder issue and we all want to play our best with him." − Fuerst

Up next

The Rams will face top-seeded Caldwell next week in the sectional semifinals. Caldwell beat High Point on Friday and holds the state's longest active win streak at 24 in a row.

Bernards (8-2) ends the season with exactly eight victories for the fifth straight season.

Patch Star Student Athlete: Mia, Of Ramsey

We all know athletes who shine whether they're competing or not. Let's help share these amazing stories!RAMSEY, NJ — We all know student athletes who also bring their A-game to other parts of their lives.Here at Patch, we've launched an initiative to help recognize these heroes making a difference in their communities. We're working to let all your neighbors know the individual stories behind the leaderboard.This submission comes from Keri Walsh who nominated Mia — a Saddle River Day School senior, of Ramse...

We all know athletes who shine whether they're competing or not. Let's help share these amazing stories!

RAMSEY, NJ — We all know student athletes who also bring their A-game to other parts of their lives.

Here at Patch, we've launched an initiative to help recognize these heroes making a difference in their communities. We're working to let all your neighbors know the individual stories behind the leaderboard.

This submission comes from Keri Walsh who nominated Mia — a Saddle River Day School senior, of Ramsey.

Star student athlete's name:

Mia

Star student athlete's home state:

New Jersey

Star student athlete's Patch town:

Ramsey

How do you know the star student athlete?

I am her mother.

What sport does the star student athlete play?

Basketball

Why do you believe the star student athlete should be recognized?

Mia is very driven in every aspect of her life. She is an incredible student and has never missed a homework assignment. She never misses a practice or a game, even when she is injured. Mia even maintained her workouts throughout quarantine by creating three hours of strengthening, conditioning and basketball drills each day so that she would be ready to play when everything reopened.

Giving back to the community and volunteering are very important values in our home. When Mia was in fifth grade, her teacher had a child, who resides at Andreas Home of Hope and Joy in Bolivia, visit the classroom. He was in the U.S. to receive medical treatment. Mia was so moved when she met him that she came home insisting that we needed to do something to help him. With our guidance and the generous donations, Mia organized a bagel breakfast fundraiser that generated $5,000 for the organization, Love In Action, that runs the orphanage. Mia and I became so involved that we spent two weeks over two consecutive summers working at the orphanage in Bolivia and developing lifelong relationships with the children and staff there. Mia also organized fundraisers — i.e. money in lieu of birthday gifts and garage sales — to raise money so that the children could go shopping to pick out new sneakers and clothing. A book drive also started a library at the orphanage.

Mia has suffered some major setbacks in the past two years. She tore her ACL in her left knee in summer 2021 and her ACL in her right knee in summer 2022. Despite her setbacks, she works every day to return to the sport she loves. She has committed to play basketball at Gettysburg College next year when she is a freshman. In order to capture a different perspective (one other than her mother's point of view), her AAU NJ Panther Basketball Coach also took the time to write something on Mia's behalf.

— From John Griff, Owner and Head Coach of the NJ Panthers

Mia Walsh is a hero.
We live in an information overload world: 24/7 news reporting, talk shows on every topic imaginable, endless social media posts, podcasts – all searching for and creating content. All too often, the negative, or the actions that can be criticized rise to the top – somehow, we are drawn to those – and acts of kindness or other feel-good stories get relegated to the last seconds of a newscast or buried deep in surrounding content. Acts of heroism get reported up front only when they involve life and death drama, typically in the face of bad behavior initiating a problem or the event involving large numbers of people.
But acts of heroism happen all day long, every day. A teacher or office worker inspires others to be kind, to be thoughtful, to go out of their way to help others. Charitable giving that doesn’t end up in a building being named for the donor but allows someone in need to eat/stay warm/get to school/whatever. Mentorship, providing a roadmap to those simply trying to navigate life. These are the acts of heroism that don’t sell ads, so they don’t make the news cycle or social media posts. Yet these are the acts of heroism that drive our individual and collective journeys forward.
Mia Walsh is a hero.
Mia is a student-athlete, driven to excel. She is a leader, leading by example as well as through her thoughts and actions as she gives direction and takes care of her classmates and teammates. She is a glue girl, a culture carrier – all in an age when being so for a teenager takes more courage than ever (see above – you make a mistake, it gets posted).
Mia suffered her first ACL tear in the Summer of 2021 – the summer of her rising Junior year of High School, a critical time for a basketball player’s college recruitment. College coaches were unable to evaluate her, so she lost much of their attention and therefore her college options. She could have wallowed in self-pity; her dream being taken away from her in a freak accident. But she didn’t. She attacked her rehab working harder than ever, ultimately making her body even more athletic than it was before the injury.
Mia completed her rehab extraordinarily fast, a credit to her work ethic and the intense effort she put in each day. But despite the quick recovery, she also lost her 2021-2022 High School Basketball season, and that Winter’s opportunities to be evaluated by college coaches. But she was ready to play at the beginning of her 2022 Spring and Summer AAU season; fueled by her inner drive and her improved athleticism, she was more productive than ever, and she once again drew the attention of college recruiters.
Then she tore the ACL in her other leg. It was a devastating scene for her teammates and coaches. And once again, Mia had a choice; embrace the challenge or run from it.
What did she choose? The work. And now, on the back of a reputation for embracing and overcoming challenges, she has been recruited to a high-profile college basketball team which she will join in September 2023.
Mia’s responses to her injuries, as well as her leadership efforts and simple thoughtfulness for others throughout the day are acts of heroism. She is an enormous influence on those around her, and every life she touches is stronger, more capable for her influence. This past Summer, after her injury, as testimony to her influence, her teammates had t shirts made for warm-ups that said, “Mia Strong.” And then they went out and played Mia Strong.
Mia may be famous one day for all her contributions. Or not. Either way. All of us owe her thanks for her influence, for her contributions to moving our journeys forward.

What's one thing you want everyone to know about the star student athlete?

Mia is a strong and confident young lady who would give the shirt off of her back to anyone who needed it. Her work ethic is going to take her far in life.

Keep up the great work, Mia!

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NJDOL Celebrates National Apprenticeship Week

TRENTON – November 14-20 is National Apprenticeship Week, and the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL) is celebrating alongside business, trade, educational, and vocational organizations, with the Department’s leaders attending events with the Ironworkers Local 399, New Jersey Healthcare Employers District 1199J Training and Development Fund, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees Local 59, Rutgers Center for Minority Serving Institutions, the New Jersey Community College...

TRENTON – November 14-20 is National Apprenticeship Week, and the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL) is celebrating alongside business, trade, educational, and vocational organizations, with the Department’s leaders attending events with the Ironworkers Local 399, New Jersey Healthcare Employers District 1199J Training and Development Fund, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees Local 59, Rutgers Center for Minority Serving Institutions, the New Jersey Community College Consortium, Viking Yacht Co./Egg Harbor School District, and the Hunterdon County Vocational School District.

“Apprenticeship programs play a critical role in the strength of our state’s workforce and have consistently proven to be a vital solution to developing talent in areas where we need it most,” said Labor Commissioner Robert Asaro-Angelo. “Apprentices can be found in virtually any realm, from HVAC to human resources, from the pharmacy to fusion energy research, and so many more.”

NJDOL also announced the availability of $2 million through the Pre-Apprenticeship in Career Education (PACE) grant program. NJDOL’s Office of Apprenticeship will host remote technical assistance workshops on November 18 and 29 to provide guidance to potential applicants. A letter of intent is due December 30, and the application deadline is January 6, 2023. For more information on the program, please see below, and read the full Notice of Grant Opportunity here.

“The PACE program has allowed us to train, mentor, and place New Jersey residents into federal healthcare apprenticeships, including out-of-school youth, adults and incumbent workers looking to enter nursing, one of the state's high-growth industries,” said Dr. Stephanie Harris-Kuiper, Executive Director of New Jersey Health Care Employers, District 1199J’s Training and Development Fund, a PACE grantee. “The real advantage of the PACE program is its ability to both help employers meet their hiring demands and service the community at large with vital and effective healthcare training."

“PACE students have helped us maintain staffing levels at a very critical time,” said Jennifer Lemonds, Director of Human Resources at Daughters of Israel, a West Orange nursing facility and PACE employer partner through District 1199J. “The students come work-ready and we have hired them across a variety of shifts to help meet staffing mandates. The PACE program helps maintain critical certified nursing assistant training and recruits new talent into the industry. It is a vital program and must be well supported going forward."

Catherine Frugé Starghill, Executive Director of PACE grantee the New Jersey Community College Consortium (NJCCC) for Workforce and Economic Development, said: “The New Jersey Pre-Apprenticeships in Career Education program is an impactful training opportunity that provides education and career pathways to students and adult learners before they enter registered apprenticeships, attend institutions of higher education, or enter the workforce. With the generous grant funding for this program, New Jersey Community Colleges have provided manufacturing and healthcare industry credentials to participants and are pleased to partner with the New Jersey Department of Labor in this critically important work.”

Rosario Viizzari, CEO of Ramsey’s Wythe Windows and PACE partner employer with NJCCC, added: “Wythe Windows is very pleased to partner with Bergen Community College with the advanced manufacturing pre-apprenticeship. This program is helping us fulfill our workforce shortage needs and it’s also helpful that the pre-apprentices we hire come with basic machining skills because of the training they receive at the college. We look forward to hiring more students in the future.”

In Fiscal Year 2022, NJDOL distributed $6,749,000 through three grant programs that support the growth of Registered Apprenticeship across the state. The individual grant funds and the totals distributed through each program are: Pre-Apprenticeship in Career Education (PACE), which awarded $1,078,000; Growing Apprenticeship in Nontraditional Sectors (GAINS), which awarded $4,636,000; and Youth Transitions to Work (YTTW), which awarded $1,034,000. In total, 24 contracts were awarded under these programs, contributing to the recruitment of 1,214 apprentices.

These three grants, which are also funded for Fiscal Year 2023, are part of a suite of apprenticeship programs under Governor Murphy’s New Jersey Apprenticeship Network, an initiative that positions the Garden State as a leader for apprenticeship programs nationwide and provides options for all New Jerseyans to build meaningful careers across a wide range of employers.

Since Governor Murphy took office, 542 new Registered Apprenticeship programs have been created in New Jersey – an 89% increase – and 12,442 new apprentices have been on-boarded. The state currently has more than 8,200 active apprentices in 1,153 programs. Notably, under the Murphy Administration, apprenticeship grant programs funded by the State have more than doubled the number of women enrolled in Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Jersey.

The Pre-Apprenticeship in Career Education (PACE) program was developed primarily to help alleviate economic barriers that hinder upskilling. PACE programs provide job readiness, essential skills, and occupation-specific training, and funding can be used to offer stipends to offset costs of supportive services, such as childcare and transportation.

Pre-apprenticeship programs funded through PACE provide education and training to prepare participants for placement into a Registered Apprenticeship program, into a post-secondary college or occupation-specific career training program, or into the workforce. PACE programs must be partnered with at least one Registered Apprenticeship program sponsor. Together, the programs expand career pathways with industry-based training and classroom instruction, leading to better-paying positions and advanced credentials. Programs funded in FY22 span a variety of sectors, including health care, practical nursing, and truck driving.

The Growing Apprenticeship in Nontraditional Sectors (GAINS) program promotes expansion of United States Department of Labor (USDOL) approved Registered Apprenticeship programs to support gainful careers and attainment of advanced credentials. The program seeks to develop new and existing apprenticeship programs and create Registered Apprenticeship programs in high-growth industries. Currently, more than half of GAINS apprentices are in the healthcare sector.

The GAINS grant program has provided unprecedented opportunities for women and people of color, with more than two-thirds of GAINS grantees being women or minorities, which is twice the average among all apprenticeship programs in the state. Women account for about half of GAINS apprentices, greater than five times the statewide average.

Youth Transitions to Work (YTTW) recruits, screens, and facilitates effective transitions of high school juniors, seniors, and out of school youth (ages 16-24) to high-skill, high-wage employment in labor-demand occupations, with long-term career potential and opportunities for occupationally relevant lifelong learning, thereby motivating youth to achieve greater success in secondary and post-secondary education.

YTTW establishes programs in new apprenticeship occupations or industries, links secondary and higher educational institutions to existing USDOL apprenticeship programs, reactivates registered programs not currently in use, and increases the number of high school graduates entering Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Jersey. Funded programs have included culinary arts, construction trades, Certified Nursing Assistant, physical therapist aide, diesel mechanic, stagehand technician, and carpenter.

To see current notices of grant opportunity, please visit: https://www.nj.gov/labor/research-info/grants.shtml

For more information on the New Jersey Office of Apprenticeship, please visit: http://apprenticeship.nj.gov.

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