HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Rockaway Township, NJ

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HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Rockaway Township, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Rockaway Township, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Rockaway Township, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Rockaway Township, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Rockaway Township, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Rockaway Township, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Rockaway Township, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Rockaway Township, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Rockaway Township, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Rockaway Township, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Rockaway Township, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Rockaway Township, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Rockaway Township, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When there is an increased concentration of growth hormone by the pituitary gland, there are positive benefits to the body. Some benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Rockaway Township, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Rockaway Township, NJ

Richard Corbett starts tenure as new schools chief in Rockaway Township

ROCKAWAY TWP. – With a full list of goals, new Superintendent of Schools Richard Corbett is ready to hit the new school year running in the grades K-8 district.“It is a privilege to be selected by the Rockaway Township Board of Education to serve as your Superintendent of Schools. My first and most important task is to meet you, our teachers, staff, town officials, and most importantly, our students who are the focus of all we do,” Corbett said in a letter to parents issued on July 8.Corbett r...

ROCKAWAY TWP. – With a full list of goals, new Superintendent of Schools Richard Corbett is ready to hit the new school year running in the grades K-8 district.

“It is a privilege to be selected by the Rockaway Township Board of Education to serve as your Superintendent of Schools. My first and most important task is to meet you, our teachers, staff, town officials, and most importantly, our students who are the focus of all we do,” Corbett said in a letter to parents issued on July 8.

Corbett replaces Superintendent Peter Turnamian, who left the post to serve as superintendent in the grades K-8 Washington Township in Morris County district. His salary is $190,000.

“As I listen to your compliments and learn about your concerns, I hope you will learn that I care about our students’ academic achievements and their educational and leadership opportunities. I am keenly focused on school security and determined that they learn in schools that are safe and clean,” he said.

“I care that you are an active and engaged member our school community, since these are your schools and any worthy educational endeavor requires strong community involvement,” Corbett said.

“One very important measure of school success is student academic achievement. Working with you, our talented teachers and school leaders, we will ensure that Rockaway students are thoroughly prepared for high school,” Corbett said.

“Student achievement grows when learning is enriched by expanding educational opportunities. Often, students learn theory in the classroom but experiences outside the classroom makes learning real. For example, earth science is experienced on a hike; American History becomes true when artifacts are seen and held,” Corbett says.

Regarding school safety, Corbett said parents will be confident that their child is spending their day in a school that provides emotional and physical safety.

“Our schools will never accept bullying behaviors and with the Board of Education, we will maintain facilities suitable for learning in the 21st century,” he said.

“After 14 years as a school superintendent, I have learned that with the combined insights and the collaboration of parents, the PTA, the teacher’s association, our community leaders and teachers and staff, our efforts will yield impressive results. Our children will be happy learning in schools that are safe, clean, and inclusive,” he said.

“I am grateful to you for the opportunity to serve this community. I look forward to meeting you and I hope to see you around town as I visit and learn what makes Rockaway Township special,” he said.

“Many years ago, I learned that education is fundamentally a personal endeavor. Before all else, a superintendent must establish a relationship with the community he serves. This relationship is vital to successfully providing students with an education that has a positive and lifelong impact. As I become familiar with the Rockaway Township Schools and meet the residents, it may be beneficial for the community to know something about me and understand what experiences I bring to the district and how these experiences will benefit our students,” Corbett writes.

Corbett attended Maritime College to pursue a career in the Merchant Marines. Later, as a young officer aboard ships, he said he was fortunate to travel extensively.

“I learned something about the wonderful and diverse cultures that inhabit our Earth, and how effective leadership can inspire a team to meet high expectations, even in the face of challenges and adversity,” he said.

He then attended Mount Saint Mary’s Seminary, where he earned a master’s degree in Divinity and a master of arts degree in Theology. After ordination, he was assigned to Immaculate Conception Parish as Parochial Vicar.

Not long after, he was assigned to the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries where he served as executive director.

“From these experiences, I learned to love and appreciate the gifts, talents, and vitality of our youth. Those I had the privilege to serve seemed always hungry to learn and zealous in helping others,” he said.

He studied special education and educational administration at St. Peter’s College in Jersey City, where he received a master degree in educational administration. He taught students with learning disabilities at North Hudson Academy, a private school for students with learning disabilities, and after a year, he served as principal of Shepard Academy, a school for high school students with special needs.

After Shepard Academy, he was named superintendent in the Borough of East Newark from 2007 until 2012, and again from 2018 to 2022. That’s a K-8 school.

In between, he held the superintendent positions in the K-8 Hardyston district in Sussex County and the grades K-12 district Roselle in Union County.

He received a doctorate degree in educational leadership from St. Elizabeth’s College, Morris Township.

“Kerry reminds me of what life is like in the trenches,” he said of his wife.

“To be sure I see things from a variety of perspectives, I listen attentively to Michael, our 12-year-old son who lets me know of the daily trials and tribulations of today’s middle school students,” he said.

“Working in K-12 education is a privilege and an extraordinary opportunity to serve our young people by facilitating the development of their intellectual, social, and inter-personal skills thus allowing them to receive and give lifelong happiness. The work can be arduous and the journey unpredictable. My consolation has always come from working with wonderful colleagues and believing that by our dedication and service to students, we can be the ones that change the world,” he said.

On May 6, Board of Education Chair Aaron Tomasini detailed Corbett’s hiring.

“Over the past several months, the Rockaway Township Board of Education conducted a rigorous search for a school superintendent. The collaborative process began with the Board of Education seeking feedback from multiple stakeholder groups throughout the district to gain insight into their perspective on what an ideal superintendent would look like,” Tomasini said.

“Meetings with several small groups produced positive insight that guided the creation of the advertisement which included district priorities and desired expectations,” he said.

“At the conclusion of the recruitment period, the district received 30 applications from quality candidates throughout the State of New Jersey. The Board of Education met numerous times to examine and discuss the potential candidates, and after extensive evaluation, began interviewing the most desired candidates,” Tomasini said.

He said candidates were introduced to a series of questions that were drawn from several different sources. After multiple rounds of interviews, the selection was narrowed down to only a few candidates, and the board unanimously agreed on the chosen final candidate, Tomasini said.

“The process resulted in the successful appointment of Dr. Richard Corbett. Dr. Corbett comes to our district with a lot of experience and we are very glad to have him begin on July 1,” he writes.

Things to Do in and Around Madison This Weekend; Dec. 16 - Dec. 18

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ - Happy Holidays everyone! Whether you celebrate Hanukkah or Christmas, there are so many festive activities happening this weekend! Have a great weekend everyone!Friday December 16Sign Up for FREE Madison NewsletterMadison Boys Basketball Game vs Boonton; at Madison High School; 2:30pmSaint Clare's Health Career Fai...

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ - Happy Holidays everyone! Whether you celebrate Hanukkah or Christmas, there are so many festive activities happening this weekend! Have a great weekend everyone!

Friday December 16

Sign Up for FREE Madison Newsletter

Madison Boys Basketball Game vs Boonton; at Madison High School; 2:30pm

Saint Clare's Health Career Fair; Rockaway Mall; 3pm - 7pm

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green- Santa House 3pm to 8 p.m. – Santa visits and photos

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green- Activity Tent 5pm to 8 p.m. – Holiday Arts and Crafts

Twombly Holiday Market; Fairleigh Dickinson University; 5pm - 9pm

Madison Ice Hockey vs West Essex; Codey Arena; 6pm

Folk Project Holiday Benefit Show; Morristown Unitarian Fellowship; 7:30pm

Planetarium Shows at CCM; 7pm - 9:30pm

Saturday December 17

Used Book Sale; Morristown Library; 10m - 2pm

Craft and Maker Fair; Rockaway Mall; 10am

Santa Photos; Garden State Harley Davidson in Morris Plains; 11am - 2pm

Santa will ride around Morris Township/North of Mendham Road beginning at 12pm

Morristown SantaCon Crawl; Morristown; 1pm

Toys for Tots Nite; SmartWorld Coffee; 3pm - 5pm

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green --Santa House Noon to 7 p.m. – Santa visits and photos

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green- Activity Tent 1pm to 3 p.m. –MOMI ClayBar; Sculpting Snowmen

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green- Activity Tent 4pm to 5 p.m. – Holiday Arts and Crafts

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green- Outdoors 2pm to 6 p.m. – Miniature Train Ride

The Twelfth Night presented by The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey; Drew University; 2pm and 8pm

Christmas Concert Fundraiser; Holy Family Chapel in Convent Station; 3pm - 5pm

Live Music with Brynn Stanley; Shanghai Jazz in Madison; 6:30pm

The Nutcracker presented by the New Jersey Ballet; Mayo Performing Arts Center; 7:30pm

Miracle on 34th Street- The Play; Holy Family School in East Hanover; 7:30pm

The Twelfth Night presented by The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey; Drew University; 8pm

Sunday December 18

Morris County Winter Farmers Market; Parking lot of Convent Train Station; 9:30am - 1pm

Breakfast with Santa; Neiman Marcus Short Hills Mall; 9:30am

At Your Own Pace: A Sendory Friendly Tour at Macculloch Hall; 9:30am - 11:30pm

Bagels and Bloodies to watch the World Cup Final; The Bottle Hill Tavern; 9:45am

Craft and Maker Fair; Rockaway Mall; 10am

1st Annual Festival of Trees; Frelinghuysen Arboretum; 10am - 4pm

Santa Photos; Garden State Harley Davidson in Morris Plains; 11am - 2pm

Santa Tour in Morris Plains; Tour begins at 11am

Outdoor Holiday Market sponsored by the Hoboken Business Alliance; Under the 14th Street viaduct; 11am - 4pm

Evergreen Wreath Workshop; Colly Flowers in Morristown; 11:30am ($95)

Santa will ride around Morris Township/South of Mendham Road beginning at 12pm

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green- Santa House Noon to 7 p.m. – Santa visits and photos

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green- Activity Tent 1p to 3 p.m. – Mayo Performing Arts Company Singing Holiday Favorites

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green -Activity Tent 4pm to 7 p.m. – Macculloch Hall Thomas Nast Ornament Coloring Activity

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green- Outdoors 2pm to 6 p.m. – Miniature Train Rides

Christmas Festival on the Green; Morristown Green -Outdoors 2pm to 6pm - Miniature Train Rides

The Nutcracker presented by the New Jersey Ballet; Mayo Performing Arts Center; 1pm and 6pm

Holiday Spectacular; Marion Sally Resident Center (music, food and fun); 2pm - 5pm

2022 Winter Holiday Concert; Madison Community House; 4pm

Menorah Lighting; Morristown Green; 5pm

Tree Lighting and Cookies and Hot Cocoa with Santa; Portofino's Restaurant in Morristown; 5pm

Menorah Lighting; Merchant Block Across from the Morris Plains Train Station; 6pm

Menorah Lighting Ceremony; Gazebo in Chatham on Fairmount Avenue; 7pm

Miracle on 34th Street- The Play; Holy Family School in East Hanover; 7:30pm

Ugly Sweater Party; Tavern Off the Green; 8pm - 10pm

Did we miss something? Let us know. Email us at [email protected]

'The baby's coming now!' Morris mom delivers surprise with New Year's birth at home

2 minute readGalaxy Veronica Mave Skolsky was not the first baby of 2023 to be born in Morris County. But her unscheduled and expedited arrival early Sunday morning certainly started the new year with a bang for her stunned family in Rockaway Township.Jennifer Skolsky went to bed early on New Year's Eve, feeling the discomfort of a pr...

2 minute read

Galaxy Veronica Mave Skolsky was not the first baby of 2023 to be born in Morris County. But her unscheduled and expedited arrival early Sunday morning certainly started the new year with a bang for her stunned family in Rockaway Township.

Jennifer Skolsky went to bed early on New Year's Eve, feeling the discomfort of a pregnancy that was expected to conclude on Jan. 10. Waking the next morning to contractions at 6:50 a.m., she realized she would soon give birth.

Less than an hour later, while in the bathroom, "I stepped away from the toilet and reached down and held her head as my body expelled her into my hands," Skolsky said. "It was easy and painless. I pulled her up to me as Kyle [her husband] rushed over to wrap us in a towel."

The plan had been for Skolsky to deliver her third child at the Mount Olive birthing center of Midwives of Morris County, which had also delivered her daughter. But as her water broke and contractions intensified, Skolsky knew they would not make it in time from their home in the White Meadow Lake neighborhood.

"She hardly cried, but whimpered enough to let me know she was breathing clearly," Skolsky said. "She was a beautiful pink color and latched easily."

Rockaway EMTs arrived to check on the mother and her 7-pound, 15-ounce, 19.5-inch child. They stayed with them until the midwife arrived.

Her husband, Kyle, summed up his response in one word: "Panic."

"I was in full panic mode," he continued. "Jen was yelling from the other room, 'The baby's coming now!' I literally opened the door and the baby was delivered. The baby flew out of her and she caught her in the air literally as I opened the door to the bathroom. It was crazy."

He finally relaxed when he saw that the baby was moving and eventually made a little whimper.

"She opened her eyes and was moving around, and started nursing right away, so I figured she was OK," he said.

New Year's babies:North Jersey's first babies of 2023 are the 'perfect addition' for loving parents

His wife was OK, too.

"The adrenaline made me feel like I could run a marathon right after," Jennifer Skolsky said. "I still feel great."

The family, including Jennifer's son, Anikan, 10, and daughter Journie, 7, remained home for the remainder of the holiday weekend. By Tuesday, the couple were back to work as a real estate sales team for Century 21 Christel Realty in Rockaway.

"Because we are partners and work together, we never really stop," Jennifer Skolsky said. "I can do most of my work from home, and my husband can go out on appointments."

Galaxy Veronica Mave, quick to arrive, has already gained a nickname as well.

"A book we were reading had a name, 'Galaxy,' which was unique but had a more common nickname, 'Alex,' which we thought was cool," Kyle Skolsky said. "We came up with the nickname Lexi, which we like a lot."

For the record, at least one new baby beat Lexi into the new year in Morris County: a girl born at 12:31 a.m. on New Year's Day at Morristown Medical Center. Mother Vinoschandrika Gnanasekaran and father Sri Harsha Bokka of Budd Lake have not yet named their new child.

Saint Clare's Hospital in Denville did not immediately respond to an inquiry about its first baby of 2023.

William Westhoven is a local reporter for DailyRecord.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Picatinny worker answers commander's call to service, as Army battles recruitment gap

Amidst a tough environment for military recruiting, the U.S. Army leaders at Picatinny Arsenal and across the nation launched a novel in...

Amidst a tough environment for military recruiting, the U.S. Army leaders at Picatinny Arsenal and across the nation launched a novel initiative in September to inspire its civilian workforce to answer a "call to service" in the nation's largest military branch.

But it surprised even her commander when Sarah Worthy, a management analyst at the Rockaway Township base, stepped forward.

The 27-year-old from Chatham Township will report to recruiter training this week after enlisting last month in the Army Reserves. An employee at Picatinny's Network Enterprise Center, she will also undergo Airborne training, followed by a 10-day psychological assessment and operations training.

"I feel conviction as well as an opportunity," said Worthy, who grew up in North Carolina. "I've been working at the Arsenal for three years and it's fine, but not the only thing I wanted to do."

Army leaders in Washington announced last year that they had fallen short of recruitment goals for fiscal year 2022 by 25%, or about 15,000 soldiers. In July, the service cut its projection for the overall size of its force for this fiscal year by 10,000 and predicted another decline in 2023.

As a result of the shortfall, the branch has ramped up recruiting efforts, including at Picatinny, which develops and tests weapons for the military. The Arsenal's senior commander, Brig. Gen. John T. Reim, sent an email in September to the mostly civilian workforce at Picatinny with the subject line, “Call to Service.”

"We are engaged in a war for talent, and failure is clearly a threat to national security," Reim wrote. "Coming out of COVID and facing the same tight labor market that has left many employers struggling to find talent, the Army’s recruitment has hit its lowest rate in the five decades of our all-volunteer Army, 60% below its FY22 requirement."

Worthy, who holds a Juris master's degree from Liberty University, is one of about 6,000 civilians, contractors and military personnel staffing Picatinny Arsenal, also known as the Joint Center of Excellence for Guns and Ammunition. The base provides products and services to all branches of the U.S. military.

As the daughter of an Army chaplain, Worthy had frequently expressed an interest in military service, "but I never went through with it," she said in an interview.

Reim's email changed all that.

"I'm a woman of faith and I prayed for guidance," she said. "When I saw the email I thought, 'well, if that isn't a sign, then what is?'"

For subscribers:Morris mom released from Greystone 'prematurely' before daughter's killing, dad claims

“I wasn’t expecting one of our own to step up and answer the call,” said Reim, who swore Worthy into service on Dec. 22.

Her father, Army Lt. Col. Shay Worthy, currently garrison chaplain at Fort Huachuca in Arizona, said his daughter had often spoken of entering the military or FBI, so he wasn't surprised about the decision.

"It was more like 'It's about time!' " he said with a laugh, adding "I'm proud of what she has already done."

The call of duty comes with tangible benefits including a $13,000 signing bonus and a $50,000 student loan repayment option as enlistment incentives.

“We are looking for motivated men and women like Sarah to join the Army team,” said Capt. Brian Fydenkevez, commander of the Army's North Jersey Recruiting Company. Still, he said, “only one in three people is eligible to join the Army based on our demanding academic, physical, and moral standards."

Worthy's full-time position with the NEC is legally protected while she’s away at training for the Army Reserves and if she ever gets called up to active duty. "That's how it works for everyone, not just at Picatinny," she said.

William Westhoven is a local reporter for DailyRecord.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Seventy-five acres preserved along Rockaway Creek in Tewksbury

A 75-acre wooded property along the Rockaway Creek that had been considered for both office and residential development since the 1980s has been permanently preserved.On Feb. 15, the nonprofit New Jersey Conservation Foundation purchased the property on the southwest corner of the intersection of Route 523 and Interstate 78 for $750,000.New Jersey Conservation immediately transferred the land to Hunterdon County, to be kept in its natural state to protect water resources, safeguard wildlife habitat and provide opportunities for...

A 75-acre wooded property along the Rockaway Creek that had been considered for both office and residential development since the 1980s has been permanently preserved.

On Feb. 15, the nonprofit New Jersey Conservation Foundation purchased the property on the southwest corner of the intersection of Route 523 and Interstate 78 for $750,000.

New Jersey Conservation immediately transferred the land to Hunterdon County, to be kept in its natural state to protect water resources, safeguard wildlife habitat and provide opportunities for passive recreation like hiking and bird watching. It is now part of the Hunterdon County Park System and is known as the Rockaway Creek Preserve.

Funding for the acquisition was provided by the New Jersey Highlands Council, with the New Jersey Green Acres Program and New Jersey Water Supply Authority contributing toward surveys, title work and closing costs.

“We’re thrilled to permanently protect this property along the Rockaway Creek,” said Jay Watson, co-executive director of New Jersey Conservation Foundation. “New Jersey Conservation Foundation has preserved land along the Rockaway Creek upstream of this property for the Hill & Dale Preserve, as well as farmland downstream. We’re grateful to our partners for making this acquisition possible.”

The newly-preserved property is bounded on the south and west by the Rockaway Creek, designated a “Category 1″ stream because it supports trout, which require clean, cool water. It also includes a pond with a small stream flowing into the Rockaway Creek.

“The New Jersey Highlands Council is very pleased to be a part of the preservation of this property,” said Lisa J. Plevin, executive director. “New Jersey Conservation Foundation did a tremendous job of working with the property owner and other partners to help ensure permanent protection of the abundant natural resources on this site, and future access for the public. We were very glad to bring federal Highlands Conservation Act (HCA) funds to this project.”

The Highlands Council leveraged HCA funding from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to secure a conservation easement on the property from New Jersey Conservation Foundation. The easement will help ensure permanent protection of the important natural resources on the site.

“Hunterdon County is proud of the work New Jersey Conservation Foundation has done to preserve this important property along the Rockaway Creek in Tewksbury Township,” said Zach Rich, deputy director of the Hunterdon County Board of Commissioners and the board’s liaison for planning and land use. “Being 75 forested acres and fronting on almost a half-mile of the Rockaway Creek, a C1 stream, seeing this land preserved thanks to the sourcing of grant dollars and funding by NJCF is a win for both environmental protection and Hunterdon County residents. Hunterdon County is grateful to include the new Rockaway Creek Preserve into the County Park System.”

Because the property will remain in its natural state, a need no longer exists for a sewage treatment plant that would have discharged into the Rockaway Creek farther downstream.

A private nonprofit based in Far Hills, New Jersey Conservation Foundation’s mission is to preserve land and natural resources throughout New Jersey for the benefit of all. In addition to protecting over 125,000 acres of open space, farmland and parks, New Jersey Conservation promotes strong land conservation policies at the local, county, state and federal levels, and provides support and technical assistance to hundreds of partner groups.

For more information about New Jersey Conservation Foundation and its programs and preserves, visit www.njconservation.org or call 1-888-LANDSAVE (1-888-526-3728).

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