TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Andover, NJ

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 HRT For Men Andover, NJ

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

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How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

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What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

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Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

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Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

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Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT Andover, NJ, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Andover, NJ

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in Andover, NJ, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men Andover, NJ

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men Andover, NJ

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

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Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

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Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

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Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

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Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men Andover, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

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Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
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What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

 Ipamorelin Andover, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Andover, NJ

'I wouldn't be here otherwise.' Andover EMT reunites with the woman he saved two years ago

Mike Lensak and Pat McCulloch, separated by about 20 years in age and 900 miles in residence, may not seem likely candidates to form a close friendship.But the two were forever connected almost two years ago when Lensak's quick thinking saved McCulloch's life.Earlier this month, they reunited for the first time since that day."It began with just a big hug, a few tears, a lot of 'thank yous' on my part," McCulloch, now 78, said of the reunion.Feted: ...

Mike Lensak and Pat McCulloch, separated by about 20 years in age and 900 miles in residence, may not seem likely candidates to form a close friendship.

But the two were forever connected almost two years ago when Lensak's quick thinking saved McCulloch's life.

Earlier this month, they reunited for the first time since that day.

"It began with just a big hug, a few tears, a lot of 'thank yous' on my part," McCulloch, now 78, said of the reunion.

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Lensak, joined by his partner Donna Kravitz, met McCulloch and her husband, Larry McCulloch, at the JW Marriott Hotel in the McCullochs' hometown of Nashville on July 10.

The couples spent more than an hour together talking and trading stories about their lives before and after Oct. 29, 2019. That day McCulloch went into cardiac arrest at Nashville's Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center.

Lensak, the current deputy mayor of Andover Township, was at the resort for an annual work seminar and had finished lunch about 15 minutes before his next meeting. Despite rarely needing to charge his phone, Lensak recalled "almost like a little voice in my head" telling him to go out of his way toward the charging station.

At the same time, McCulloch, who was working for an event management company called PRA, began to feel dizzy and collapsed as she walked back to an assignment. Two of her coworkers performed CPR as her face began to turn blue.

Lensak, a certified emergency medical technician with the Lakeland Emergency Squad, happened upon the scene on his way to the charging station and stepped in to help. A security guard brought over an automated external defibrillator, and as the only person present who was familiar with the device, Lensak put it to use.

"He and those little paddles, and his training in being able to use those paddles, were what brought me back to life," McCulloch said.

McCulloch said her heart was "out of rhythm" for at least seven minutes — she is unsure of the exact time — before the AED successfully revived her. Other emergency responders arrived shortly after to take her to the hospital, but she credited Lensak's initial actions as the most significant.

"I greatly appreciate the training that he had and his willingness to step up and use that training," she said. "I wouldn't be here otherwise."

Lensak later received a gift basket from the hotel along with a thank-you note from PRA. McCulloch, however, did not learn Lensak's name until she saw a New Jersey Herald article about the incident around Thanksgiving. She tracked down his phone number and called to express her gratitude.

"For someone who saves your life it's pretty inadequate, but it's the best I could do," McCulloch said.

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McCulloch also invited Lensak to reach out if he ever came back to Nashville. He did when he was there with Kravitz for a brief trip in early July. He thought of McCulloch's invitation the day before they were leaving — "It was just one of those things that popped into my mind," he said — and they quickly set up a meeting at the hotel where Lensak and Kravitz were staying.

Lensak was unsure about McCulloch's recovery over the past two years, but he was relieved to hear that she has no lingering effects from her episode.

"To see her so dynamic, spring in her step," Lensak said, "it was just really great to see that she's enjoying life."

Lensak became an EMT in January 2018, and though he let his certification lapse during the COVID-19 pandemic due to health concerns, he is looking to take some refresher courses in the coming months. Fortunately, the Nashville incident marked the first and only time he ever needed to use an AED to revive someone.

"Right now my batting average is a thousand, so I've got that going for me," he joked.

McCulloch is now Facebook friends with Lensak, so she was able to read the dozens of comments on Lensak's post about their reunion. She was particularly struck by one message, which said God put Lensak in the right place at the right time to save McCulloch and that "her job on Earth is not done yet."

Since her near-death experience, McCulloch sees greater value in living life to the fullest, being kind to others and generally doing the right thing. After all, she said, "Mike did the right thing that day."

Kyle Morel can also be contacted on Twitter: @KMorelNJH, on Facebook: Facebook.com/KMorelNJH, or by phone: 973-383-1292.

Work on century-old Roseville Tunnel in Andover to advance Sussex County rail service

ANDOVER — The light at the end of the Roseville Tunnel just might be the reconstruction of the more-than-century-old passageway that has held up re-establishment of the Lackawanna Cut-off and commuter rail service to Sussex County.Rep. Josh Gottheimer visited the site of the long-proposed Andover station, just west of the tunnel on Monday to announce funds are now guaranteed for New Jersey Transit to move forward and take bids for the work to rebuild the tunnel.The funds to support the proposed service expa...

ANDOVER — The light at the end of the Roseville Tunnel just might be the reconstruction of the more-than-century-old passageway that has held up re-establishment of the Lackawanna Cut-off and commuter rail service to Sussex County.

Rep. Josh Gottheimer visited the site of the long-proposed Andover station, just west of the tunnel on Monday to announce funds are now guaranteed for New Jersey Transit to move forward and take bids for the work to rebuild the tunnel.

The funds to support the proposed service expansion of the Lackawanna Cut-off and bring passenger rail to Northwestern New Jersey come from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill, approved earlier this year and signed into law by President Joe Biden.

With the guaranteed federal money to restore the tunnel, Andover and Sussex County can move forward with the associated project to buy land to rebuild and reroute a stream that flows under Roseville Road near the station.

The station on Roseville Road in Andover is to be the temporary end-of-the-line when passenger service begins, but Gottheimer said the federal money will also cover rebuilding the entire 28 miles of the Lackawanna Cutoff, allowing Amtrak to bring passenger rail service between New York City and Scranton, Pennsylvania, with stops along the way.

Andover Mayor Thomas Walsh showed Gottheimer the issues with the passing stream and noted the town's commitment to purchase the land for the project expires in June and the town has run out of extensions.

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With the land purchase, the town can proceed with moving the stream. The county's work - replacing a small bridge - can be done without any additional land purchases.

In his remarks, Gottheimer chided New Jersey Transit for "drudging along for more than a decade" on the restoration of rail service from the southern tip of Lake Hopatcong, westward to where the Cutoff crosses the Delaware River in Knowlton Township in Warren County.

There are about 28,000 commuters a day to New York and eastern New Jersey from Sussex County and adjacent areas of the foothills of Pennsylvania's Pocono Mountains, Gottheimer said.

"Sussex County residents have the longest commute of anyone in New Jersey, 38 minutes," he said, "And Vernon residents are said to have the worst commute in the entire state.

The restoration of the Lackawanna Cutoff, completed in 1909, has been on the books for several decades. Passenger service was stopped last century and rail service was discontinued in 1978.

The right-of-way was purchased privately but was never developed and the rails were pulled up and sold. New Jersey Department of Transportation took ownership of the right-of-way in 2001.

About a decade ago, NJTransit began to rebuild the railbed and laid track in a couple of places between Hopatcong and the tunnel, located adjacent to the northeastern corner of Andover's C.O. Johnson Park.

Issues with engineering studies and bidding on the restoration of the interior of the tunnel have since held up the project.

From the beginning of the cutoff's history, the tunnel has been problematic with rocks falling from the tunnel's roof onto the tracks.

The restoration has called for building a new ceiling to the 1,024-foot-long tunnel as well as installing modern communication links for commuters and train crews as they pass through the tunnel.

NJTransit has a bid that is good for six months, said its President Kevin Corbett after a meeting last week.

At that same meeting, Gottheimer told the board he supported the restoration project and moving to award a bid for the Rosevale Tunnel project. He noted that "unfortunately, this project has been subject to repeated delays and uncertain timetables with regulatory hurdles, property disputes and inter-agency negotiations over the last 15 years with no construction having occurred on the project since 2012."

Walsh said this is a "unique one-time opportunity for the residents of the state of New Jersey to receive 75% federal funding for the extension of what would be passenger service across state lines into Pennsylvania."

"Imagine what we can do if we had a way for more people to get here," Gottheimer said about stations in Sussex County.

Staff Writer Colleen Wilson contributed to this report

Editor's Note: This story has been updated with a clarification to reflect Andover has used all its extensions with the agreement now expiring in June.

Testimony continues at hearing for BHT proposal in Andover

ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — The Land Use Board continued to hear testimony for a proposed construction storage facility on Stickles Pond Road, as attorneys for the applicant and residents clashed over numerous questions posed to the witness.Board members also voted unanimously at Tuesday's hearing to hire an environmental expert to review the applicatio...

ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — The Land Use Board continued to hear testimony for a proposed construction storage facility on Stickles Pond Road, as attorneys for the applicant and residents clashed over numerous questions posed to the witness.

Board members also voted unanimously at Tuesday's hearing to hire an environmental expert to review the application submitted by BHT to use the approximately 100-acre property to store construction equipment such as bulldozers, dump trucks and excavators.

Elizabeth Durkin, who represents residents neighboring the proposed site, questioned Marielle Sainz, chief of operations for BHT Construction, for several hours. When Sainz was asked about her job history prior to joining BHT about a year and a half ago, she said she worked construction sites similar to the one proposed in Andover.

Sainz said she oversees four active sites owned by the BHT— one each in New York, Minnesota, California and Florida — with a fifth, in Maryland, set to begin operations next month. While the current sites include three storage containers across the four properties, the plan in Andover calls for anywhere between 500 and 1,000 containers measuring 40 feet in length.

Durkin grew frustrated with numerous objections raised by Roger Thomas, the attorney representing BHT, regarding her questioning as the hearing went on. Thomas said the line of questioning, which attempted to clarify the site's layout and day-to-day operations, was not relevant to Sainz's role at the company.

Durkin, meanwhile, said the questions were relatively simple in nature. She expressed concern when Sainz was not able to provide specific information on how much material will be stored in containers and how it will get to and from the site.

"Right now, I'm just trying to ask basic questions of operations," Durkin said. "I did not offer this witness as the operations/facility manager for BHT Construction; the applicant chose to put this person here. And quite frankly, the board should be dismayed that basic questions of operations can't be answered."

Sainz said employees on the site, between 10 and 20 at a time, would be better equipped to address logistical matters brought up by Durkin.

"With regards to storing the pipe in the containers, I will speak to my construction crew and ask them how they would like to store it in there," Sainz said. "They would be the ones who would have the knowledge on how to load and unload that into a container. They're the ones daily on site, and I will speak with them and I can get an answer for you."

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Thomas said Chris Nusser, an engineer representing BHT's application who testified in July, would be able to answer some of the questions. Nusser did not testify asSainz's testimony ran long. He is expected to be available at the next hearing.

Board members voted to retain an environmental expert in response to a July letter from the Andover Township Environmental Commission, which raised various concerns about the impact the proposed BHT facility may have on the property and surrounding area.

Board Chair Paul Messerschmidt said the expert will be paid using funds from the township's escrow account and will not cost taxpayers additional money.

The board is also open to a possible new location for future hearings at the request of BHT officials. The Hillside Park barn was able to accommodate a larger crowd during the COVID-19 pandemic, but with capacity restrictions no longer in place, Thomas said the applicant hopes to find a venue with better acoustics and lighting.

BHT representatives will discuss the matter with the board at its next regular meeting, scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Dec. 7, at the Andover Township Municipal building.

"No substantive proceeding will take place at that Dec. 7 meeting. No testimony will be heard," said board attorney Tom Molica. "Rather, the applicant and the board will determine when the next hearing date will be and where it will be."

The company's proposed site plan is significantly different from the auto auction and storage facility that was first submitted in early 2020. The new proposal, which was first announced at the Land Use Board's March meeting, is listed as a "construction business office and construction equipment and material storage facility" that is permitted use in the zone where the property is located.

The site plan calls for BHT to use the approximately 100-acre property to store construction equipment such as bulldozers, dump trucks and excavators. The facility would also include aggregate construction materials no more than 8 feet tall as well as storage containers 8 feet, 6 inches high to hold fencing and piping.

After 18 months of delays, BHT Properties hearing on for Tuesday in Andover

ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — The oft-postponed BHT Properties Group application for Stickles Pond Road, prolonged for more than 18 months by COVID-19 restrictions and a change in the scope of site plans, is set to resume Tuesday night.In anticipation of high attendance numbers, the Andover Township Land Use Board meeting has been relocated to the Hillside Park barn. Set to begin at 7:30 p.m., the meeting is expected to bring in witnesses for the application that calls for storage of construction vehicles, equipment and othe...

ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — The oft-postponed BHT Properties Group application for Stickles Pond Road, prolonged for more than 18 months by COVID-19 restrictions and a change in the scope of site plans, is set to resume Tuesday night.

In anticipation of high attendance numbers, the Andover Township Land Use Board meeting has been relocated to the Hillside Park barn. Set to begin at 7:30 p.m., the meeting is expected to bring in witnesses for the application that calls for storage of construction vehicles, equipment and other materials on the 100-acre property.

The application has met resistance and opposition from the start as residents voiced concern with potential environmental problems and increased traffic. Some concerns have been about contamination of the nearby Pequest River, aesthetics and the wildlife that will be displaced from the property.

"It's going to look like a penitentiary," said Eileen Ibranyi, whose home sits directly across from the proposed BHT site.

"It's residential. It's not commercial in this area," said Ellen Metzgar, another member of the neighborhood. "A clean venue would be welcome."

Roger Thomas, the attorney representing BHT, said the residents' concerns were more applicable to the original BHT application, which consisted of a partnership with online vehicle auction company Copart to develop a storage property for used vehicles before they are sold. That project was set to be heard in March 2020 before it was put on hold due to COVID.

The hearing was subsequently postponed for several months as the applicant hoped for an in-person meeting to present the application. In the meantime, residents concerned about the proposed project formed the "Stop BHT Junkyard Andover Township" group and hired an attorney to represent them in the hearings.

Thomas said the new application, introduced in March and which Township Engineer Cory Stoner deemed complete in May, is "less intrusive" than the initial one. He said BHT is aware of the various wetlands and buffer areas on the property, and is "respecting those fully and completely."

Last month, the hearing did not take place as scheduled due to a delay in BHT presenting completed plans to the board. It marked the third time in four months since in-person meetings resumed that a scheduled hearing was postponed.

Some residents said it feels like the postponements are part of a calculated move by BHT to make community members lose interest in the application.

The September 2020 meeting — the only in-person hearing for the original application — filled most, if not all, of the seats at the barn. The following month, the crowd was so large the meeting had to be postponed because the turnout exceeded the capacity under COVID restrictions.

In the year since, neighbors said many residents who rallied against the proposal at the beginning have become less invested, not bothering to attend meetings under the assumption that the hearing will again be postponed.

"Because of the fact that BHT continues to receive these adjournments or delays or postponements, whatever you call them, this has been really enough already," Metzgar said. "We can take into consideration maybe a couple of months because of COVID, but now that has run its course."

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Thomas, however, said he and BHT officials were "ready to proceed" with the hearing in May. While he took responsibility for the August postponement due to a lack of witnesses, he noted that it was the board that decided not to continue with the hearing in July and to postpone last month's meeting in order to receive some additional site plan materials.

"My client would be much happier if we had a determination in the fall," Thomas said. "We're not going to get that, and that's too bad."

Residents are also skeptical of the motivation behind the new plan. They are convinced that BHT only scaled back the project to get Land Use Board approval and will eventually revert to the original site plans.

"It's a backdoor tactic, a ruse to get in there," said Ray Wexler, a member of the Andover Township Environmental Commission who said he was speaking as a private citizen. "Once they own the property, then it's pretty much they're going to do whatever they want."

Thomas said that is not so, though he understood residents' concerns based on his experience as a board attorney.

He noted that the Land Use Board representatives would likely draft a resolution that specifically outlines how BHT is allowed to operate at the site. He said company officials "have no intention" to expand, and even if they did, they would not be authorized to do so without going through the board approval process again.

"The idea is legally impossible for us to be able to (expand)," Thomas said.

Thomas has been involved in the second application only, and said the initial partnership with Copart dissolved because of the public opposition. He said BHT, in both applications, has tried to avoid being labeled "bad neighbors."

Some residents still do not want the company to be neighbors at all.

"I understand the Land Use Board, they have to hear (the application), they have to be at least somewhat concerned about the town getting sued," Wexler said. "But at the same time, they have a job to do as far as protecting the town. Whether it's Copart or whatever it is now, it's the wrong project for this area."

Recycling company that once planned massive Andover Township plant is liquidating assets

A North Jersey company that once planned to build the world's largest glass recycling plant in Andover Township started selling off its assets last Wednesday.More than two dozen trucks, including tractor-trailers and dump trucks, owned by Jersey City's Pace Glass are on the auction block this week as part of liquidation proceedings. The company needs to pay back its creditors and is also facing ...

A North Jersey company that once planned to build the world's largest glass recycling plant in Andover Township started selling off its assets last Wednesday.

More than two dozen trucks, including tractor-trailers and dump trucks, owned by Jersey City's Pace Glass are on the auction block this week as part of liquidation proceedings. The company needs to pay back its creditors and is also facing a lawsuit filed in October by the New Jersey Attorney General’s Office, records show.

State officials have accused the company of allowing contaminated stormwater runoff to flow off Jersey City properties it has used to illegally stockpile crushed glass mixed with solid waste.

"The stockpiled glass is also a source of dust and odors that impact the quality of life of nearby residents, and multiple fires occurred at the site in May 2021, directly threatening public safety," said a statement from the Attorney General’s Office.

The state complaint alleged the company has used properties on Caven Point Avenue and Bishop Street in Jersey City to store glass materials purportedly awaiting processing and resale. The Caven Point Avenue site contains more than 300,000 cubic yards of crushed glass material, which is mixed with plastic, paper, food debris and other solid waste, according to state officials.

In its complaint, the state is seeking penalty payments, a contamination cleanup and the removal of the outstanding debris. Records show the sites received violations as early as 2016 from the Hudson Regional Health Commission for operating a solid waste facility without a permit on Bishop Street and using an unapproved site on Caven Point Avenue.

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In Andover, local officials in the spring of 2021 began to require Pace Glass to remove bales of glass from the planned mega-plant site after the Health Department received complaints. Pace Glass had been using a Swedish company's baling system to store recyclable glass fragments in anticipation of its reuse. However, Andover officials also began to consider the recyclables solid waste, records show.

Fred Semrau, the municipal attorney for Andover Township, said Township Committee members will be discussing the future of the site during an executive session scheduled for next week.

"It's a matter that we're still looking at from the legal and the engineering standpoint," he said.

The online auction of the Pace Glass vehicle fleet is the first phase of a court-ordered liquidation, records show. It is set to be followed by the sale of the Jersey City glass recycling facility on Bishop Street. It is unclear what will happen to the 85-acre Andover property and the adjacent 5-acre portion in Lafayette.

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The company ended operations in June 2020, according to state officials. That April, it received approval for a $326,520 loan through the federal Paycheck Protection Program, records show.

CEO George Valiotis and other investors in 2014 bought Pace Glass, an existing Jersey City operation. The business concept revolved around receiving, separating and reselling glass from area recycling centers using German-engineered optical sorters, Valiotis told NorthJersey.com at the Andover groundbreaking in 2018. He said some customers and suppliers were on board, but predicted that a completed plant and steady product would add more. The company planned to provide discounts to local solid waste collectors bringing glass loads with limited debris and sell colored and clear glass pieces to large glassware manufacturers.

“Our close proximity to major cities and towns will really give us an advantage on collecting what is often destined for landfills and considered trash,” he said that May. “This is for the future, but we have the sales right now. We're confident.”

Company officials said they planned to spend up to $90 million on the Andover project, which was expected to be competed by 2022. More than 420,000 tons of bulk glass chips brought mostly through an adjacent rail line were estimated to be processed at the facility each year in plans submitted by Pace Glass officials to Andover Township.

The project's main backer was Efstathios Valiotis, a billionaire New York real estate mogul who owns Queens-based Alma Bank. He is expected to be the main beneficiary of the upcoming liquidation. His real estate company, Alma Realty Corp., owns the Andover and Lafayette lots. Valiotis could not be reached for comment.

David Zimmer is a local reporter for NorthJersey.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

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