TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Delaware Park, NJ

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 HRT For Men Delaware Park, NJ

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

 Human Growth Hormone Delaware Park, NJ

How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

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What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

 Sermorelin Delaware Park, NJ

Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

 TRT Delaware Park, NJ

Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

 Hormone Replacement  Delaware Park, NJ

Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT Delaware Park, NJ, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Delaware Park, NJ

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in Delaware Park, NJ, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men Delaware Park, NJ

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men Delaware Park, NJ

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

 Human Growth Hormone Delaware Park, NJ

Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

 Ipamorelin Delaware Park, NJ

Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

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Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

 TRT Delaware Park, NJ

Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men Delaware Park, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT For Men Delaware Park, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Human Growth Hormone Delaware Park, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

 Ipamorelin Delaware Park, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number973-587-8638

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Latest News in Delaware Park, NJ

Delaware Riverkeeper Network opposes upgrading Water Gap to National Park

The Delaware Riverkeeper Network is opposing any re-designation of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area because it might be too successful, and lead to overdevelopment of the areas of New Jersey and Pennsylvania outside its boundaries.In separate letters to members of the Delaware River Basin Commission and to the members of the DEWA National Park Steering Committee, the DRN takes the position that, similar to what has happened around other national parks, there will be hard-to-control development outside the...

The Delaware Riverkeeper Network is opposing any re-designation of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area because it might be too successful, and lead to overdevelopment of the areas of New Jersey and Pennsylvania outside its boundaries.

In separate letters to members of the Delaware River Basin Commission and to the members of the DEWA National Park Steering Committee, the DRN takes the position that, similar to what has happened around other national parks, there will be hard-to-control development outside the park's boundaries.

"The footprint and activities plan, by sheer virtue of their size and scope, will inflict irremediable harm and undermine efforts of NPS to prioritize river protection over visitor experience," states the letter sent to the steering committee, which includes former superintendent John Donahue and the Sierra Clubs of both New Jersey and Pennsylvania. "And as with other national parks nationwide, the new status will attract massive new development activity outside of the park that will cause a level of local buildout that will inflict additional unacceptable harm over which the NPS has no control."

In addition, the letter cites concerns over potential impact on water quality in the area.

"It is our considered opinion that the water quality and ecosystem impacts of the development planned shouldnational park status be achieved, compounded by development outside of the park boundaries that willadditionally ensue, will compromise the high quality water and natural ecosystems of the River, to a degreenot in keeping with the needs and goals of our region or the Special Protection Waters designation that wehave worked so hard to secure and uphold for the non-tidal River,"

The letter to members of the DRBC is more succinct: "We are concerned that the water quality and ecosystem impacts of the development planned should national park status be achieved, compounded by development outside of the park boundaries that will additionally ensue, will compromise the high quality water and natural ecosystems of the River, to a degree not in keeping with SPW protections."

Copies of the two letters, dated Thursday, were made available to the New Jersey Herald.

The Steering Committee is not associated with the National Park Service while the DRBC is a federal agency, charged with preservation and protection of the Delaware.

The commission is made up of the governors of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware and a federal representative, usually a high-ranking officer of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The commission is currently chaired by Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf.

The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area was created more than 50 years ago to include land around a lake which was to be formed by the Tocks Island Dam. While the dam project was cancelled, the Corps of Engineers had already purchased or taken by eminent domain most of the property within the recreation area. Ownership was transferred to the National Park Service and became the Water Gap Recreation Area.

The plan to re-designate the land as a national park has met with stiff opposition by newly-formed citizens groups, as well as most of the municipalities bordering the park.

Story continues after gallery.

The Riverkeeper Network is a not-for-profit group formed in 1988 and "champions the rights of our communities for a Delaware River and tributary streams that are free-flowing, clean, healthy, and abundant with a diversity of life" according to its website.

The Delaware River is the longest un-dammed river east of the Mississippi, beginning as two rivers in the Catskill Mountains which join at the New York/Pennsylvania border and empties into Delaware Bay. Along the way, the river is drinking water source for 17 million people in the four states.

In addition to the recreation area, three sections of the river also have been protected by designation under the Clean Waters Act which carry designations as units of the National Park Service.

The letter to the DRBC goes on to say, "The ecological health and low level development within and around the DWGNRA has been key to the exceptional water quality and ecosystem health of the main stem River and tributaries throughout the region."

Within the National Park Service there are several designations, such as "recreation area," "battlefield," "monument," "preserve" and "historic site."

There is federal law covering each of those designations and what activities may be carried out within a designation's boundaries.

Most recreation areas surround man-made lakes and reservoirs and allow most outdoor activities from swimming to hiking and hunting/fishing.

National Park designation, however, does not allow for "extraction" of natural resources, including wildlife, which means no hunting, fishing or trapping. National parks also most often charge an entry fee to users.

The recreation area, which is known as DEWA within the NPS, does charge for use of some areas, such as beaches, boat launches and some campsites. However, with more than three dozen entry points into the park, there is no general fee and some park roads are regular commuter routes.

The plan put forward by proponents of national park designation does take into account the opposition centered around hunting and fishing and proposes to designate some portion of DEWA as the "Lenape Preserve," where hunting and fishing would be allowed.

However, the current plan does not include any map or description of what would be Lenape Preserve and what would be Delaware Water Gap National Park.

Both letters also reference the "preserve" but question how much the Lenape people have been involved.

"We are also concerned that while Lenape representatives living in the Midwest have been included in theplanning process, the Lenape Nation and tribes of our region, those that have an intimate, personal andenduring relationship with our River and watershed have not," the letter states. "The perspective of the local Lenape tribes and people is essential and must be honored. Failure to include them in planning seems a dramatic oversight ofhigh concern."

Both letters are signed by Maya K. van Rossum, the Delaware Riverkeeper and Deputy Director Tracy Carluccio.

Neither the steering committee nor the DRBC had returned calls seeking comment by Friday afternoon.

Is it time to expand NJ Transit rail service to Pennsylvania ? Petition thinks so.

A petition is asking state and federal officials to return NJ Transit’s Raritan Valley Line service to its historical roots by restoring commuter train service to Phillipsburg and across the Delaware River to Allentown, Pennsylvania.The Change.org petition asks NJ Transit, the U.S. Department of Transportation, Gov. Phil Murphy and the state s...

A petition is asking state and federal officials to return NJ Transit’s Raritan Valley Line service to its historical roots by restoring commuter train service to Phillipsburg and across the Delaware River to Allentown, Pennsylvania.

The Change.org petition asks NJ Transit, the U.S. Department of Transportation, Gov. Phil Murphy and the state senate to consider the idea, saying it is “unacceptable” that Phillipsburg, Easton, Allentown and Bethlehem are without passenger rail service.

The petition also cites increasing rush hour traffic and congestion on Interstate 78 as a reason for restoring rail service.

As of Monday afternoon, the petition, started by a Pennsylvania resident last month, had just under 100 signatures.

The idea has been studied as recently as 2011 by the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority (NJTPA) as part of a larger look at the I-78 corridor. That study updated an earlier 2008 report that looked at ideas to ease traffic congestion on I-78.

A companion study was done by the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission in 2010 to investigate extending rail service 17 miles from the state line with stations in Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton. The study also looked at express bus service to Bridgewater and New York City.

The 2011 NJTPA study found that significant residential housing growth had occurred recently in Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley and further growth is forecasted to continue through 2030. This growth is expected to increase commuter volumes along the I-78 corridor in New Jersey and will induce a need for additional transportation alternatives.

Extensive and frequent congestion on I-78 and Route 22 is expected to worsen over the years, the study said. Access to existing Raritan Valley rail stations from western parts of Hunterdon County and Pennsylvania requires commuter drive I-78 through the congested segments between Clinton and Phillipsburg. The area is also underserved by existing bus service and most bus park-and-ride facilities fill up early each weekday, the 2011 study said.

Extending rail service to Phillipsburg would require extending the Raritan Valley line on property that NJ Transit already owns as well as building four stations and parking lots. The study projected it would cost $315 million to extend the Raritan Valley line 20 miles on Norfolk Southern railroad property to Phillipsburg. The estimated cost of the line in Pennsylvania was estimated at $658.9 million by the LVPC study.

The NJTPA study concluded that the challenge of funding any of the rail alternatives is significant.

“At this time there are no plans to extend the Raritan Valley Line (RVL) past High Bridge, but we retain the right of ways to preserve those rights in case demand would warrant a future expansion,” said Jim Smith, an NJ Transit spokesman.

Service to Phillipsburg was provided by the limited number of Central Railroad of New Jersey intercity trains to Allentown and Harrisburg. In 1967, that interstate service was discontinued as the railroad went into bankruptcy.

In 1974, New Jersey provided funding to extend service as far west as Phillipsburg. Ridership was very low and at the end 1983 NJ Transit discontinued the Phillipsburg service, the study said.

Advocates from the Raritan Valley Line Coalition have focused their efforts to get a one-seat ride for commuters into New York Penn Station. Currently rush hour commuters have to change trains at Newark Penn Station to reach Manhattan.

While NJ Transit has offered off-peak direct service for some Raritan Valley Line trains, extending that to rush hour trains depends on construction of the Gateway Tunnel and an addition to Penn Station’s tracks and platforms in New York City.

Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a subscription.

Township Details Initial Concept Plan for Proposed Waterfront Park

BORDENTOWN TOWNSHIP, NJ — Bordentown Township residents got their first look at preliminary plans to transform a 72-acre property along the Delaware River into a waterfront park during a public meeting held virtually on Wednesday, July 20.The Township announced its purchase of the parcel in October 2020. Set along the Delaware River between Fieldsboro and Mansfield, the property was originally slated for a 330-unit high-density housing development and transit village when it was purchased by a private developer ...

BORDENTOWN TOWNSHIP, NJ — Bordentown Township residents got their first look at preliminary plans to transform a 72-acre property along the Delaware River into a waterfront park during a public meeting held virtually on Wednesday, July 20.

The Township announced its purchase of the parcel in October 2020. Set along the Delaware River between Fieldsboro and Mansfield, the property was originally slated for a 330-unit high-density housing development and transit village when it was purchased by a private developer in 2008. However, the developer could not complete the project and decide to place the land and project into a public auction.

“The current Township Committee recognized the potential issues involving that action and also took into account the other residential development that occurred since the initial approval of this large-scale development and the need for open space preservation and recreation for our growing community,” said Mayor Stephen Benowitz during last week’s meeting, noting that the Township moved “proactively” to preempt the auction and purchase the property.

“The Committee saw the opportunity to create an open space recreation and preservation park that would benefit Bordentown Township, our neighboring communities and the entire region for generations to come,” Benowitz continued. “The Township Committee had the foresight to see this as a legacy project and one that would be a true jewel in the crown of Bordentown Township, the Crossroads of the Heart of New Jersey.”

To help with the creation of a new park, the Township enlisted consulting firm Triad Associates to develop a plan of action, and, through Triad, the Township entered into a no-cost agreement with the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA), Division of Local Planning Services to begin the planning phases of the Waterfront Park project.

During last week’s meeting, the public was given a presentation of the initial concept plan of the park by Raymond Joseph of DCA, who is Project Lead for the Waterfront Park project. Joseph detailed the history of the property, discussed responses given by the community in an online survey administered by the Township and detailed the park’s proposed features in the initial concept plan.

In addition to the public survey, planners interviewed stakeholders and looked at Master Plans and Land Use Plans from both Burlington County and Bordentown Township when crafting the park’s preliminary concept plan.

The public online survey initiated by the Township saw about 379 responses and detailed residents’ and visitors’ opinions on their current favorite parks (#1- Crystal Lake Park; #2- Joseph Lawrence Park; #3- Northern Community Park) as well as their preferred passive recreation activities, including the top responses of walking/hiking, bicycling, dog walking, utilizing playgrounds, bird watching/wildlife viewing, attending outdoor events, canoeing/kayaking and running/jogging.

Through the survey, members of the public conveyed their highest priorities for Waterfront Park, including amenities such as adequate restrooms, furnishings and places to sit, water fountains, public parking, safety and security. The survey found several recurring themes from the community, such as the want for trails of all kinds, water access to the Delaware River for viewing, kayaking and canoeing, fishing and paddle boarding, open space for outdoor fitness and educational and special events and picnic and play areas.

Features included in the Waterfront Park preliminary concept plan include a Bald Eagle habitat area, waterfront trail, launch for canoes, kayaks and non-motorized boats, fishing pier, lookout point with an integrated climbing feature, a boathouse with canoe/kayak storage and rentals, ample parking, flexible green space for hosting community events, exercise stations, an inclusive and accessible playground with a picnic and barbeque pavilion, educational signage, an amphitheater with scenic views of the Delaware River and Newbold Island, a camping area, hiking trails and multipurpose bicycle and pedestrian trails.

Joseph noted that the proposed park will be “well served by transportation lines,” including the RiverLine and major highways including Routes 295 and 130. “Access to the site is wonderful,” he said. In addition to road transportation, the Park would be part of the Tidal Delaware Water Trail, a 56-mile stretch of accessible river opportunities that runs from Delaware County, PA up to Trenton. It will also be a part of the Delaware River Heritage Trail and the yet-to-be-completed Circuit Trail Network, which will connect all of the greater Philadelphia area with bicycle and pedestrian trails and paths.

The site has some known contamination, and remediation is the top priority when it comes to the building of Waterfront Park, according to Township Administrator Mike Theokas.

“The DEP has been working with us on this project,” Theokas told a Township resident who was concerned about contamination issues. “They are aware of the contamination. We have some (Hazardous Discharge Site Remediation Fund) grants in place, the Township has also committed funds for remediation and we are going through the remediation process now. Certainly nothing constructive can happen until that is taken care of, and we are planning on that now.”

“This is a long-term project and that is the first thing, obviously, the safety of those who will be using the park,” Theokas continued. “That’s why we got the DEP involved in this process at this point, in addition to the DCA. Prior to any of these wonderful things happening, the site needs to be clean and safe. We are aware of everything, the DEP is aware of everything, and we have a clear plan in place to remediate it and the funds available to do so.”

In addition to Waterfront Park, plans for the property also include a “very small residential project,” as the Township has a small affordable housing obligation to develop, according to Theokas. “The amenities for that project will flow right into the entire park,” he said.

Comments from the public on the initial plans were positive. Township resident James Pendleton remarked that he appreciated the plans for more access to the Delaware River.

“That’s something I am always interested in, without having to go into Bordentown City,” he said. “It would be nice to be able to access it from another point that has less traffic and less congestion.”

Township resident Ann Cahill-Makowsky said that she “loved all of the ideas about the park” and suggested the use of environmentally-responsible structures throughout, as well as environmentally-sensitive lighting that use less energy and give off less light pollution in the sky.

Township Committeeman Eric Holliday urged planners to consider building a pump track in the park, which he says could be used by cyclists, skateboarders and rollerbladers of all ages and skills levels and would teach riders essential skills and build fitness in a low-risk environment.

“It is a great way, which I think is really important, for children to get out from behind the screens and basically fall in love with biking,” said Holliday.

Theokas stressed that last week’s meeting was just the beginning in a long process, and that the Township is “nowhere near the end” when it comes to planning the project. He encouraged residents to reach out to the Township as well as the planners at DCA with their ideas for Waterfront Park.

To view the plans presented at last week’s meeting and to get contact information to submit opinions and ideas about the Waterfront Park project, CLICK HERE.

“This is just one important step in this process. There is much more to come,” said Benowitz. “But this concept plan moves our dream forward and brings us closer to the end goal. The Committee recognized from the beginning that this is a long-term project. The time spent now will pay great dividends in the future. This Waterfront Park will become a truly great feature that will benefit Bordentown Township and the region for generations to come.

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10 free NJ events to check out before summer ends

It’s August, which means we’re only a few weeks away from the start of school and we’re all back into our regular routine.I’m watching friends post on Facebook from other parts of the country send their kids back to school already.Luckily, here in New Jersey, we still have summertime to enjoy.It feels like Memorial Day was just last month but we’ve already been through two full months of summer.Summer vacation is something we all look forward to whether you spend it at the Jersey Shor...

It’s August, which means we’re only a few weeks away from the start of school and we’re all back into our regular routine.

I’m watching friends post on Facebook from other parts of the country send their kids back to school already.

Luckily, here in New Jersey, we still have summertime to enjoy.

It feels like Memorial Day was just last month but we’ve already been through two full months of summer.

Summer vacation is something we all look forward to whether you spend it at the Jersey Shore, take a road trip to another beach, or hop on a flight and head somewhere tropical.

We’re now in the final weeks of perfect beach weather and everyone trying to fit events, activities, and even one last vacation in before Labor Day hits.

We’ve been able to indulge in a lot this summer like fireworks, carnivals, and fairs like the State Fair at the Meadowlands, and the big Festival of Ballooning that takes place in Hunterdon County.

There have been all kinds of concerts taking place in the Garden State from music in a park to big festivals on the beach in Atlantic City.

But there’s still time to soak in the summer and enjoy family time out and about during these last few weeks of warm weather.

Here are 10 free events happening in the Garden State this month:

Keyport Fireman’s Fair

Aug. 2 – 6

American Legion Dr. & W. Front St., Keyport, NJ

It’s the 54th annual Fireman’s Fair located on the waterfront at Firemen’s Park in Keyport. The Fair features carnival rides for all ages, carnival games and prizes, great food, and more. There will be a fireworks display on the night of Aug. 6. For more info, click HERE.

Free movies on the beach – Jenkinson’s

Aug. 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30 - 8 p.m.

300 Ocean Ave., Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ

Every Tuesday of the month you can enjoy a movie on the beach by Jenkinson’s Aquarium. This is weather permitting. For more info, click HERE.

Pier Village Family Fun Night

Aug. 7, 14, 21, and 28 – 12 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Festival Plaza, Pier Village

Every Sunday of the month, you can check out rides, games, mini golf, a rock-climbing wall, trampoline bungee, and more. For more info, click HERE.

New Jersey Friends of Clearwater Music Festival

Aug. 6 and 7, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Red Bank's Riverside Gardens Park

This is an annual music festival where proceeds benefit the New Jersey Friends of Clearwater (501(C)3 Charitable Organization). There are 2 stages with local and national performers. You can hear all kinds of artists from soul, folk, rock, jazz, Latin, country, and more. For more info, click HERE.

The Italian American Association of Ocean Township Annual Italian Festival

Aug. 10 – 14

200 Whalepond Rd., Oakhurst, NJ

If you love the taste of traditional Italian food and heritage and culture, this festival is for you. But not only is there food, but rides, games, music, and more. Click HERE for more info.

Passaic County Fair

Aug. 11 – 14

Nothing says a fair like pony rides, games, bounce houses and fair food. Friday and Saturday night will feature a firework display and every day will be filled with local music complimented with a beer garden and local food. Click HERE for more info.

New Brunswick Heart Festival

Aug. 13, 3 p.m. – 7 p.m.

This festival celebrates all of the arts and history that New Brunswick has to offer. There will be craft and food vendors, live music and performances, interactive activities, games, and more. For more info, click HERE.

Flemington’s Corn, Tomato and Beer Festival

Aug. 13, 12 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Stangl Rd., Flemington, NJ

This festival will feature an expansive micro-brewery beer garden, live music, food like New Jersey corn and tomatoes, and family entertainment (there will be a kids zone). for more info, click HERE.

Asbury Refresh – Vintage, Oddities & One of a Kind Collectibles

Aug. 13, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

104 Grand Ave., Asbury Park, NJ

Over 50 vendors selling unique items and all things vintage, oddities and one-of-a-kind collectibles. For more info, click HERE.

Atlantic City Airshow

Aug. 24

See the show from Atlantic City’s FREE beaches and Boardwalk

The Air Force is sending The Thunderbirds to this airshow along with the U.S. Army’s Golden Knights parachute team and other airshow performers. For more info, click HERE.

These are the best hiking spots in New Jersey

A trip to New Jersey doesn't have to be all about the beach. Our state has some incredible trails, waterfalls, and lakes to enjoy.

From the Pine Barrens to the Appalachian Trail to the hidden gems of New Jersey, you have plenty of options for a great hike. Hiking is such a great way to spend time outdoors and enjoy nature, plus it's a great workout.

Before you go out on the trails and explore some of our listeners' suggestions, I have some tips on hiking etiquette from the American Hiking Society.

If you are going downhill and run into an uphill hiker, step to the side and give the uphill hiker space. A hiker going uphill has the right of way unless they stop to catch their breath.

Always stay on the trail, you may see side paths, unless they are marked as an official trail, steer clear of them. By going off-trail you may cause damage to the ecosystems around the trail, the plants, and wildlife that live there.

You also do not want to disturb the wildlife you encounter, just keep your distance from the wildlife and continue hiking.

Bicyclists should yield to hikers and horses. Hikers should also yield to horses, but I’m not sure how many horses you will encounter on the trails in New Jersey.

If you are thinking of bringing your dog on your hike, they should be leashed, and make sure to clean up all pet waste.

Lastly, be mindful of the weather, if the trail is too muddy, it's probably best to save your hike for another day.

I asked our listeners for their suggestions of the best hiking spots in New Jersey, check out their suggestions:

Tillman Ravine near stokes state forest! Following the stream to larger pools in the spring and summer are so nice to walk through! It is beautiful and so lush green!

South Mountain Reservation Fairy Trail. Not really hiking, more of a walk in the woods but so much fun with kids. They get to look for fairy houses while you walk and end at a stream they can go in when it’s warm or throw rocks in.

Netflix’s Most Popular English-Language TV Shows Ever

These are the most popular TV shows ever on Netflix (in English), based on hours viewed in their first 28 days on streaming.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5's Morning Show Producer Kristen. Any opinions expressed are her own.Questions, corrections, or comments? Send Producer Kristen an email at [email protected] or follow her on Instagram.

'It's raining spotted lanternflies': Delaware Valley sees invasive pest in large numbers

PENNSAUKEN, N.J. - Spotted lanternflies are an invasive and annoying bug making a full and overwhelming comeback in the Delaware Valley in 2022.Fortunately, there are a few things people can do to stop their spread."They’re destroying trees and plants. I’ve seen signs to please stomp them," Gavyn Essner lamented. "They are down there in these baby trees. This is four days worth and it’s covered."For three years in a row, Essner has been at war. It’s a war again...

PENNSAUKEN, N.J. - Spotted lanternflies are an invasive and annoying bug making a full and overwhelming comeback in the Delaware Valley in 2022.

Fortunately, there are a few things people can do to stop their spread.

"They’re destroying trees and plants. I’ve seen signs to please stomp them," Gavyn Essner lamented. "They are down there in these baby trees. This is four days worth and it’s covered."

For three years in a row, Essner has been at war. It’s a war against the spotted lanternfly. His backyard in Williamstown, N.J. is infested with the invasive bugs. Not harmful to humans, but they are killing off trees and vegetation, and covered just about everything in his yard in a dark, sooty mold.

"This was the worst year, so far. The previous years we’ve seen them here and there, nothing major, but this, by far, is the worst," Essner explained. "I had to wrap tape around the trees this year. It was like it was raining lanterflies when you walk outside."

Now, in their "Instar" stage, big adults will soon be swarming. Best to stomp and kill them, but Essner says they just keep coming.

"I’m on five or six rolls by now and they’re still accumulating," Essner said. "We’ll stick with this, it’s the best we got."

The spotted lanternfly is an invasive, non-native insect from Asia. They feed off fruit trees, woody trees, ornamental trees, grapes and grape vines, vegetables and herbs. In their wake, they leave a sticky mass on leaves, branches and bark. People are encouraged to check their vehicles for the bugs, as they are excellent hitchhikers and will easily travel outside a quarantine zone once attached to vehicles or trailers.

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has put out a spotted lanternfly alert. More information on the bug and how to report them to officials can be found here. All Pennsylvania counties in the Delaware and Lehigh valleys are in a spotted lanternfly quarantine.

Many communities are taking action against the pest. Through the summer, Camden County will be spraying lanterfly pesticides at county parks, including, later this week at Cooper River Park.

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