TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Delaware, NJ

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 HRT For Men Delaware, NJ

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

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How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

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What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

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Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

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Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

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Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT Delaware, NJ, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Delaware, NJ

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in Delaware, NJ, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men Delaware, NJ

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men Delaware, NJ

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

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Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

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Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

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Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

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Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men Delaware, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT For Men Delaware, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
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What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

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Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Delaware, NJ

Rutgers-Camden faculty oppose the plan to haul liquified fracked gas across South Jersey | Opinion

By Jovanna Rosen and Jim BrownA proposal to transport liquified fracked gas on trains and in trucks through densely populated Camden, Philadelphia and southern New Jersey threatens enormous harm across the region. It’s no wonder that this scheme has drawn serious opposition — and that the company behind it is trying to claim it scrapped the idea. As Rutgers-Camden faculty, we stand with Camden...

By Jovanna Rosen and Jim Brown

A proposal to transport liquified fracked gas on trains and in trucks through densely populated Camden, Philadelphia and southern New Jersey threatens enormous harm across the region. It’s no wonder that this scheme has drawn serious opposition — and that the company behind it is trying to claim it scrapped the idea. As Rutgers-Camden faculty, we stand with Camden residents and community groups in opposing this dangerous and potentially catastrophic proposal.

New Fortress Energy, through its affiliate Delaware River Partners, is behind the plans to expand an existing port in Gibbstown, along the Delaware River south of Philadelphia, into a massive fracked-gas export facility. The company would transport liquified natural gas (LNG) from northeastern Pennsylvania, to be loaded onto tanker ships at the Gibbstown port.

Nearly every aspect of this project puts the health and safety of South Jersey and southeastern Pennsylvania residents and workers at risk for the sake of energy company profits. For this reason, we believe unions like ours must be part of the community-led effort to oppose such projects.

Our faculty and graduate worker union at Rutgers believes in “bargaining for the common good”; a labor strategy that builds community-union partnerships to achieve a more equitable and sustainable future. As this project demonstrates, our lives and well-being are deeply interconnected. We are stronger when we organize together with our partners against threats to our communities, our environment, and our collective future. We must work together to make our communities safer and more sustainable. Opposing the transport of LNG is one way to address these concerns, given the risks of the proposed plan and the carbon emissions associated with LNG.

Transporting LNG is inherently dangerous. Cooling natural gas to a liquid state increases the risk of combustion if its container is punctured in a truck accident or train derailment. Prior liquified natural gas derailments and traffic accidents have caused massive explosions, uncontainable fires, significant property damage, and casualties. Shipping by train poses a particular risk since a chain reaction caused by a train car derailment could cause a massive explosion.

While federal guidelines specify that LNG sites should be “remote,” as many as 1.9 million people live within two miles of the proposed transportation route for this project. Many potentially affected communities, including Camden, Trenton and Gloucester counties, have already experienced unjust burdens from past environmental degradation, which has contributed to worse environmental and health outcomes in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color.

With permits for the proposal pending at the state and federal levels, the project has faced widespread opposition across the region. Thanks to the advocacy of Food & Water Watch, Delaware Riverkeeper Network, and several other organizations, over 15,000 people signed a national petition to President Biden asking him to reenact a ban on the transport of LNG by rail; 15 New Jersey municipalities have passed resolutions opposing the project; another 13 resolutions have been adopted in Pennsylvania and Delaware and over 90 organizations from across New Jersey have signed a letter asking Gov. Phil Murphy to reject permits for the Gibbstown terminal. While the governor has publicly stated his opposition to the LNG export terminal, his Department of Environmental Protection continues to issue permits for it.

The good news is that as opposition grows and the LNG proposal is examined more carefully, its future becomes more uncertain. Delaware Riverkeeper Network is appealing all three major permits for the terminal, and two federal agencies are taking a closer look. Recently air permits for the liquefaction plant in Wyalusing, Pennsylvania, have expired.

While this is a win for opponents of the project, New Fortress Energy’s history of misleading regulators and the public to circumvent regulatory oversight is evidence that we must continue pressuring Governor Murphy and President Biden to stop this project in its tracks.

Jovanna Rosen is an assistant professor of Public Policy at Rutgers-Camden and a member of the Rutgers AAUP-AFT Climate Justice Committee.

Jim Brown is an associate professor of English at Rutgers-Camden and president of the Camden Chapter of Rutgers-AAUP-AFT.

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Tri Cape out of softball Carpenter Cup for COVID protocols; Olympic Colonial advances

The Tri Cape softball team is out of the softball Carpenter Cup for COVID safety protocols after going 3-0 in Monday’s action and clinching a spot in Wednesday’s quarterfinals.The tournament released the revised schedule on Tuesday night with Tri Cape’s quarterfinal opponent, Mid Penn, moving on to the semifinals by forfeit.Olympic Colonial will join Jersey Shore, which qualified Monday, by going 3-0 on Tuesday and allowing just two runs in three games. Haddon Heights stars Sophia Bordi and Maddy Clark, who ...

The Tri Cape softball team is out of the softball Carpenter Cup for COVID safety protocols after going 3-0 in Monday’s action and clinching a spot in Wednesday’s quarterfinals.

The tournament released the revised schedule on Tuesday night with Tri Cape’s quarterfinal opponent, Mid Penn, moving on to the semifinals by forfeit.

Olympic Colonial will join Jersey Shore, which qualified Monday, by going 3-0 on Tuesday and allowing just two runs in three games. Haddon Heights stars Sophia Bordi and Maddy Clark, who led the Garnets to the Tournament of Champions title just over a week ago, stepped up again.

Bordi pitched eight scoreless innings, striking out 16 and allowing just three hits. Clark, meanwhile, led the offense by going 6-for-11 with four doubles, two triples, six runs and two RBIs while also throwing four hitless innings with seven strikeouts.

Cherokee lefty Sammie Friel also dominated in the circle. In six innings, she did not allow an earned run and fanned nine. Gloucester’s Hannah Bryszewski was 5-for-9 with six runs scored and two RBI.

Olympic Colonial defeated Mid Penn, 7-0, Berks County L/L, 5-1 and Philadelphia PCCAF, 12-1. It will face Jersey Shore in the quarterfinals at 8 a.m. on Wednesday.

Semifinals and finals are to follow at noon and 2 p.m.

Burlington City went 0-3 on Tuesday and was eliminated. It lost to Philadelphia Catholic, 4-3, Delaware North, 5-1 and Delaware South, 2-0. Burlington City freshman Tuleen Ali was 4-for-5 with a walk for Burlington City.

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Kay Properties Delaware Statutory Trust and 1031 Exchange Expert, Jason Salmon Invited to Speak During New Jersey Real Estate Capital Markets Conference on Tuesday, June 21 in Edison, NJ

Hosted by Mid-Atlantic Real Estate Journal, the 6th Annual New Jersey Capital Markets Conference will examine why so many investors are turning to Delaware Statutory Trust investments for their 1031 Exchanges TORRANCE, Calif. , June 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Jason Salmon, Senior Vice President and Managing Director of Real Estate Analytics for ...

Hosted by Mid-Atlantic Real Estate Journal, the 6th Annual New Jersey Capital Markets Conference will examine why so many investors are turning to Delaware Statutory Trust investments for their 1031 Exchanges

TORRANCE, Calif. , June 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Jason Salmon, Senior Vice President and Managing Director of Real Estate Analytics for Kay Properties & Investments will be discussing why more and more real estate investors are selling their investment properties and turning to Delaware Statutory Trust investments for their 1031 Exchanges. The presentation will be part of the 6th Annual New Jersey Real Estate Capital Markets Conference being held on Tuesday, June 21 at the Sheraton Edison Hotel in Edison, NJ.

According to Dwight Kay, founder and CEO of Kay Properties, the real estate investment climate has changed dramatically over the past couple of years, prompting many owners of rental properties to evaluate their investment options.

"Today's rental property owners have never faced greater challenges. Regulations associated with COVID-19, rent control, eviction moratoriums, and the growing number of headaches associated with 'tenants, toilets, and trash', have forced many investors to consider selling their investment properties and to search for 1031 exchange investment options," said Kay.

With more than 20 years of commercial real estate and financial advisory experience, Kay Properties' Jason Salmon will present an expert perspective on the issue, focusing on tax-advantaged exit strategies and estate planning solutions revolving around 1031 exchanges.

"There are two very specific issues that DST investments help investors solve when they are evaluating the possibility of selling their rental and commercial real estate. The first is, what about the taxes associated with selling investment real estate? In many cases, this can eat away as much as 40-50% of their proceeds. The second issue is finding suitable replacement properties for a 1031 Exchange within the designated 45-day timeframe. Delaware Statutory Trusts found on the www.kpi1031.com marketplace can potentially be the perfect solution to both issues," said Salmon.

According to Salmon, are a form of fractional ownership that can be used to make passive investments, both via a 1031 exchange and as a direct cash investment, in real estate and achieve monthly income potential and diversification across multiple assets including industrial, multifamily, self-storage, medical and retail properties. Also, it is not uncommon to find properties within a DST investment that include high-quality assets like those owned by large investment firms, such as a 375-unit Class A multifamily apartment community or a 300,000-square-foot industrial distribution facility leased to a 500 logistics and shipping company. Plus, because DSTs are eligible for 1031 exchanges, investors can sell their investment property and reinvest the proceeds into one or more DST investments while deferring capital gains and other taxes.

For more information on Delaware Statutory Trust 1031 Exchange investments, please visit .

Kay Properties is a national Delaware Statutory Trust (DST) investment firm. The platform provides access to the marketplace of DSTs from over 25 different sponsor companies, custom DSTs only available to Kay clients, independent advice on DST sponsor companies, full due diligence and vetting on each DST (typically 20-40 DSTs) and a DST secondary market. Kay Properties team members collectively have over 150 years of real estate experience, are licensed in all 50 states, and have participated in over of DST 1031 investments.

Where the wild things are: A field guide to interesting species in N.J.

New Jersey is well-known for packing people into its roughly 7,300 square miles, but a lesser-known fact is the state burgeons with wildlife, boasting more than 500 species.“Considering we are the most densely populated state per square mile by human population, we have more diversity of species per square mile than any other state,’’ said Diane Nickerson, director, Mercer County Wildlife Center, which rescues wild animals from across...

New Jersey is well-known for packing people into its roughly 7,300 square miles, but a lesser-known fact is the state burgeons with wildlife, boasting more than 500 species.

“Considering we are the most densely populated state per square mile by human population, we have more diversity of species per square mile than any other state,’’ said Diane Nickerson, director, Mercer County Wildlife Center, which rescues wild animals from across New Jersey.

This wildlife abundance is thanks to a diversity of habitats — coastal, wooded, farmlands and pinelands. Following is a look at some of the interesting creatures that love Jersey as much as we do.

Conservation efforts have spurred an increase in humpback whales along the Jersey Shore, especially in spring, when these majestic creatures feed right off the shore. Photo courtesy of Jersey Shore Whale Watch

Conservation efforts have spurred an increase in humpback whales along the Jersey Shore, especially in spring when these majestic creatures feed right off the shore, munching on bait fish, as they migrate north to birth their calves.

“Whale watching trips are growing out of this,’’ said Tim Dillingham, executive director, American Littoral Society, which has partnered with the SeaStreak ferry company to offer sea cruises where guests can see whales, dolphins, seals and seabirds.

With 30-some species of waterfowl that winter in New Jersey and others that make a spring stopover on their way north, the state is humming with all varieties of these colorful creatures.

Cape May is the one of the best spots to see red knots. Photo courtesy of The Wetlands Institute

Cape May is home to the largest stopover site of red knots in the Western Hemisphere. These pretty, plump sandpipers are drawn by an abundance of horseshoe crabs that lay their fatty eggs in the spring, giving the birds the lipids they need to complete their long Arctic migration.

Visiting from early May to early June, thousands alight on bay beaches and in Cape May Point State Park, leading conservations to joke that Cape May is the “last stop before the Turnpike,’’ Dillingham said. “That’s a worldwide recognized phenomenon.’’

In the winter, the Atlantic brant, a small sea goose slightly larger than a mallard, hangs out along the Jersey coast, mostly in back bay inlets, departing around the beginning of May for the Arctic, while the colorful harlequin duck can be found in Barnegat Light.

“New Jersey’s certainly the place to be if you’re looking for your Atlantic brant,’’ said Ted Nichols, wildlife biologist, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.

The Pine Barrens treefrog is one of New Jersey’s most colorful amphibians. Photo courtesy of The Wetlands Institute

The Pine Barrens treefrog is one of New Jersey’s most colorful amphibians, thriving on the area’s unique ecosystem, said Brian Williamson, research scientist, The Wetlands Institute. These little green and purple guys ?— about 2 inches long ?— live here all year long, but are hard to find except during mating season, which starts in April, when their honking calls echo throughout the Pine Barrens.

“They are the iconic frog species in New Jersey,’’ Williamson said. “It’s the only place in the Northeast where you find them.’’

The eastern box turtle is the most terrestrial turtle found in New Jersey. It likes water but is not adapted for swimming in water. Photo courtesy of The Wetlands Institute

Another species unique to Jersey is the endangered eastern tiger salamander. Measuring about 13 inches long, it is the largest salamander in the state and is seen mostly from late fall until early spring during breeding season. Also found in abundance in South Jersey are the eastern box turtle, northern pine snake and diamondback terrapin turtle.

“It’s especially unique,’’ Williamson said, ‘’that we have wildlife you can’t find a state north or south of us.’’

Nancy Parello writes frequently for NJ Advance Media/Jersey’s Best. A former statehouse reporter, she previously worked for the Associated Press and The Record.

This article originally appeared in the Summer 2022 issue of Jersey’s Best. Subscribe here for in-depth access to everything that makes the Garden State great.

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NJ TRANSIT ‘Re-Imagining’ Bus Service in Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties

The historic study represents the first time the travel agency is taking a holistic approach to its tri-county bus service. Recommendations from the first draft are expected after Labor Day.For the first time in its history, NJ TRANSIT is “re-imagining” its BCG bus network, which serves Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties, and seeking feedback from riders and the general public during the process.The s...

The historic study represents the first time the travel agency is taking a holistic approach to its tri-county bus service. Recommendations from the first draft are expected after Labor Day.

For the first time in its history, NJ TRANSIT is “re-imagining” its BCG bus network, which serves Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties, and seeking feedback from riders and the general public during the process.

The study, called “Newbus BCG,” is part of the agency’s broader, 10-year strategic plan, and comes at a time when transit agencies nationwide “are actively redesigning their bus networks to meet emergent travel needs,” NJ Transit Media Relations Director Jim Smith said.

Cities including Houston, Omaha, Jacksonville, Columbus, and Baltimore have already redesigned their bus networks, according to the New York-based TransitCenter foundation, and SEPTA in Philadelphia is undertaking a similar process at present.

Why is this happening now?

For a start, NJ TRANSIT has never undertaken a comprehensive study of the regional BCG bus network, Smith said. Many of the 27 routes that comprise the BCG have been operating on the same corridors for decades, inherited from old trolley and bus networks no longer in operation.

Adapting the NJ TRANSIT bus network to serve best the needs of its riders in the future will mean “evaluating the performance of existing routes, identifying new areas of travel activity, and actively engaging with regional stakeholders, current customers, and the general public on travel needs,” Smith said.

The agency surveyed riders along its routes last fall, and is planning to engage public stakeholders throughout the process.

Another major reason to undertake the re-imagining now is that transit agencies are starting to recover from ridership drop-offs during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Transit agencies that had already seen a downturn in ridership amid the growth of telework and rideshare services were hammered during the pandemic, said Greg Krykewycz, Director of Transportation Planning for the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC), with regional rail services losing about 90 percent of riders, and regional bus services shedding about 40 percent.

“Local, fixed-route bus ridership was some of the most stable during the pandemic,” Krykewycz said; “people who had to go to work all along to keep the lights on for office workers who had options.”

Who rides?

NJ TRANSIT riders tend to be lower-wage earners who don’t have access to a personal car, and who may rely on bus service four or more times per week.

People younger than 18 account for two percent of all riders in the BCG study area; another 15 percent are college students.

Fully 60 percent of BCG riders self-identify as non-white, and 40 percent come from economically disadvantaged households, according to the agency. There are also large groups of riders among seniors and people with disabilities.

Krykewycz also pointed out, importantly, that people who ride buses “often have fewer travel options,” which makes them regular customers of the service, and in many cases wholly dependent upon it for access to important destinations throughout the tri-county region.

“Buses are the bread and butter of our regional transit system,” he said. “They have the most ridership and the most stable ridership of any modes. They’re critical parts of the regional transportation network.”

Goals and hurdles

The principal challenge of the BCG re-imagining exercise will be to balance equity of access issues with efficient route design. In dense areas like Camden City, Burlington City, Glassboro, and Paulsboro, the need for frequent service is clear.

It’s more of a challenge to connect riders farther out from major transit centers with the services they desperately need.

“Suburban bus routes become lifeline bus routes,” Krykewycz said.

“But you end up with these long, slow, circuitous routes in some places that take a long time instead of driving.

“How can transit improve the quality of life for its rider base as effectively as possible, and serve its ridership as quickly as possible?” he said.

“It’s going to be a choice between as much extent of service as possible, so that everyone has something, or less service, but concentrated in places to serve the most people effectively.”

Ultimately, the aim of improving the BCG bus routes is to create a service that approaches the directness and comparable expense of the regional rail system.

“That’s something to aspire to,” Krykewycz said. “The tradeoff there might be that some places that have service now might have a lower level of service.”

Some of those interruptions or eliminations of service may be overcome by smaller, on-demand microtransit systems, which constitute smaller vehicles with flexible routes. Such solutions are difficult to establish, but definitely in demand, Krykewycz said.

“Smaller vehicles taking people to Walter Rand, that’s happening now, providing connections to Philadelphia, or the Pureland industrial complex [in Swedesboro],” he said.

“There’s a lot of people trying to access those jobs in freight and warehousing, which are some of the fastest-growing jobs we have in our area: good jobs that pay a good wage, but are hard to serve with transit.”

In the final calculus, the success of any changes implemented will be measured by whether NJ TRANSIT gains new riders, stabilizes its revenues, and achieves a greater degree of travel equity throughout its service area. However, Krykewycz notes that, regardless of their preferred mode of transit, every traveler is a stakeholder in the success of route re-evaluations like these.

“No piece of infrastructure is break-even,” he said. “Roads, trains don’t pay for themselves. There’s consequences for everybody if these things don’t work as well as they should.”

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