TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Lodi, FL

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 HRT For Men Lodi, FL

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

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How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

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What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

 Sermorelin Lodi, FL

Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

 TRT Lodi, FL

Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

 Hormone Replacement  Lodi, FL

Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT Lodi, FL, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Lodi, FL

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in Lodi, FL, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men Lodi, FL

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men Lodi, FL

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

 Human Growth Hormone Lodi, FL

Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

 Ipamorelin Lodi, FL

Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

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Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

 TRT Lodi, FL

Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men Lodi, FL

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT For Men Lodi, FL

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Human Growth Hormone Lodi, FL

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

 Ipamorelin Lodi, FL

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Lodi, FL

News of those who serve 1/18/23

Cody C. Alt, Sgt., Sgt. U.S. Marine Corps, Motor Transport Maintenance Chief, Combat Logistics Company 16, stationed in Yuma, Arizona. He is the son of Duane and Dawn Alt, and Carla Alt, all of Prairie du Sac. He is a 2004 graduate of Sauk Prairie High School and joined the Marine Corps in 2007.Daniel H. Haag, Airman U.S. Navy, is stationed at NAS Jacksonville, Florida. He is the son of Dave Haag and Nancy and Bruce Culver, and brother of Amy Hutter all of Prairie du Sac. He is a 2001 graduate of Sauk...

Cody C. Alt, Sgt., Sgt. U.S. Marine Corps, Motor Transport Maintenance Chief, Combat Logistics Company 16, stationed in Yuma, Arizona. He is the son of Duane and Dawn Alt, and Carla Alt, all of Prairie du Sac. He is a 2004 graduate of Sauk Prairie High School and joined the Marine Corps in 2007.

Daniel H. Haag, Airman U.S. Navy, is stationed at NAS Jacksonville, Florida. He is the son of Dave Haag and Nancy and Bruce Culver, and brother of Amy Hutter all of Prairie du Sac. He is a 2001 graduate of Sauk Prairie High School.

Paul F. Anthony, Jr., U.S. Marine Corps, was recently promoted to Lance Corporal. He is stationed with the headquarters squadron of Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina. He is the son of Dianne and Paul Anthony of Sauk City. He is a 2017 graduate of Sauk Prairie High School.

Jordan M. Breunig, Pvt., Army National Guard, graduated from basic combat training at Fort Sill, Lawton, Oklahoma. He is the son of Craig and Kelly Breunig, Sauk City.

Kurt Caldwell, Sgt., Wisconsin Army National Guard, Reedsburg Charlie Troop 105th Cavalry Unit, residing in Sauk City with his family.

Victor Duenow, Lt., is a U.S. Naval Aviator completing a tour of duty as a Sr. Helicopter Flight Instructor at Whiting Field, Milton, Florida. He is assigned to the USS Theodore Roosevelt, CVN-71 in Norfolk, Virginia. He is the son of Russ and Afton Duenow, formerly of Prairie du Sac (now living in Fredericksburg, Virginia.).

Sara C. Forman, Senior Airman, Air Force, is stationed at Dover Air Force Base as an aerospace ground equipment journeyman. She is the daughter of Teressa Forman, of Sauk City and David and Heide Forman, of Mount Horeb.

Tom Hankins Jr., Sgt. 1st Class, Army Reserves, is member of the FEMA Region V, Emergency Preparedness Liaison Office-Wisconsin Team. Hankins is son of Tom and Erleen Hankins, of Prairie du Sac.

Ryan M. Hanson, Col., is currently serving as commander, U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Jackson, South Carolina; previously served as commander of the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Ft. Hood, Texas. His operational deployments include Pakistan, Philippines, Afghanistan and Poland. A 1991 graduate of Sauk Prairie High School, he is the son of Robert and Diane Hanson of Prairie du Sac.

Nathan Hutter, Chief Petty Officer, U.S. Navy, is again stationed in Norfalk, Viginia. He is the son of Greg and Alice Hutter.

Shaun M. Jones, Pvt., Army Reserve. Jones is the son of Kim Jones, of Merrimac.

Valerie A. Kalscheur, Airman 1st Class, Air National Guard, graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Kalscheur is the daughter of Dan Kalscheur of Lodi and Cherie Lane of Prairie du Sac.

Mikail Koci, Pfc., is stationed at Ft. Wainwright, Alaska. He is the son of Sandra Breunig and John Koci. He is a 2008 graduate of Sauk Prairie High School.

Austin McGuine, 1st Lt., is attending the Armor Basic Officer Leaders Course at Fort Benning, Georgia. Upon completion, he will be station at Fort Knox, Kentucky. He is a 2008 Sauk Prairie High School graduate and a 2012 graduate of St. Norbert College with a bachelor of arts in political science.

Joshua V. Meier, Staff Sgt., is stationed at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Meier is the son of Cathy and Doug Wirth and Vince and Jenny Meier, of Sauk City.

Brett Newsome, Sgt. 1st Class, Army National Guard, 32nd Red Arrow division, is stationed in Bagdad for his second tour. He is the son of Darlene (Pietsch) Newsome and the late Charles Newsome.

Gregory J. Palmer, SSG Army National Guard, returned from his second tour overseas. He is a 2007 Lodi High School graduate and a 2016 Upper Iowa University graduate. He is the son of Randy and Maureen Palmer and husband of Brooke Palmer of Merrimac.

Justin W. Padley, Airman, Air National Guard, completed basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. Padley is the son of Bill and Sharon Padley of Lodi.

Kevin C. Pelletier, Army ROTC, has graduated from the program at Fort Lewis, Tacoma, Washington. He is the son of Marion S. Pelletier of Williamsport, Maryland, and Kevin J. Pelletier of Lodi. He is a 2004 graduate of Williamsport High School.

Jason Randall, 1st Lt., in the Army Reserves, based out of Eau Claire. He is a registered nurse. He is the son of Sandi and David Randall, of Balsalm Lake and the son-in-law of Ronald and Jane Beloungy, of Prairie du Sac.

Nicole Randall, 2nd Lt. with the 452nd Army Reserve Unit in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She will be performing as a registered nurse with the unit. She is the daughter of Ronald and Jane Beloungy of Prairie du Sac and wife of Jason Randall.

Eric N. Ringelstetter, Lt. Col., F-35 instructor pilot in the U.S. Air Force, stationed at Luke Air Force Base in Phoenix, Arizona. He is a 2001 Sauk Prairie High graduate, 2005 University of Colorado – Boulder graduate, masters in Advanced Military Studies from SAMS, Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, and son of Nick and Kay Ringelstetter of Prairie du Sac.

Travis B. Rosmann, Sgt. Second deployment to Iraq. He has a sister living in Sauk City.

Joseph T. Saulys, Airman, Air Force, graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. He is stationed at Incirlik, Turkey. He is the son of Tom and Gail Saulys of Prairie du Sac and a 2008 graduate of Sauk Prairie High School.

Jodi Schneider, Drill Sgt., U.S. Army Reserves, is stationed out of Milwaukee, 95th Division, 334 Battalion. She is the daughter of Robert and Sue Hager of Prairie du Sac. She is a 2005 graduate of Sauk Prairie High School.

Carol Sorg, ADAN, stationed in Ridge Crest, California.

Craig G. Sternberg, Lance Cpl., is stationed at Norfolk, Virginia. He is the son of Roy and Pam Sternberg, of Prairie du Sac.

Randall E. Stiemke, Airman, Air National Guard, graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. He is the son of Sandra Stiemke of Loganville.

Jackson Mellum, PFC, U.S. Marine Corps is stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. He is the Son of Troy and Christan and the Brother of Madi Mellum.

Local Business Owner and Long-time A&W Franchisee to Open Altoona, Wisconsin’s First A&W On January 10th

Altoona, WI (RestaurantNews.com) A&W Restaurants, the classic American franchise, is coming to Altoona at 2870 Woodman Dr. Altoona, WI 54720 on January 10th. Dee Wells and her husband own two A&W locations in Withee and Spencer. Their success, trust, and love for the brand has led them to open a new A&W location in Altoona, with a...

Altoona, WI (RestaurantNews.com) A&W Restaurants, the classic American franchise, is coming to Altoona at 2870 Woodman Dr. Altoona, WI 54720 on January 10th. Dee Wells and her husband own two A&W locations in Withee and Spencer. Their success, trust, and love for the brand has led them to open a new A&W location in Altoona, with additional plans to expand throughout the area.

Together, Dee and John have owned and operated a car wash and a gas station with a convenience store. However, Wells has always had a passion for the restaurant industry. Wells has taken that love of the industry and opened A&W locations in Withee and Spencer. After seeing success with her first two A&W restaurants, Wells decided to open two more locations in the area. She plans to open the first one in Altoona on January 10th and another location in Cadott by the end of May.

Dee believes that the most important thing to do as a business owner is to give back to the community that has constantly given to her- which is why she is so excited to bring A&W to the community of Altoona.

“We do a lot for the community,” said Dee Wells. “I was raised in this area, and I love the community feel of a small town. I make sure that as a business, I do whatever I can to give back to the community that gives to me. We are constantly involved in local events and reaching out to schools and programs to help kids in the community.”

Dee and her husband plan to continue their devotion to their community for years to come through their business ventures.

“My personal goal is to have ten restaurants by the time I retire,” said Dee Wells. “If my new locations do well in the future, I will continue to expand in those areas. This is a brand I can see my family being involved in even after I retire, so I want to set them up for success.”

With the A&W opening in Altoona there will be 45 A&W locations in Wisconsin.

“We’re extremely fortunate to have Dee with us. I think her story really encapsulates where we are as a brand,” said John Palumbo, A&W Sr. Director of Franchise Development. “We believe Wisconsin has the capacity to house several more additional successful restaurants. For over 100 years the A&W brand has resonated with so many Americans across this great country and Addison is no different. This is only the tip of the Root Beer Float for A&W in Wisconsin.”

The new Altoona location is part of A&W’s plan to award 25 units to franchisees in 2022 and open 12 new locations. A&W is looking to target both new and existing markets including additional Midwest states like Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin, but also North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida and Nevada.

About A&W Restaurants

Established in 1919 in Lodi, CA as a roadside stand, A&W Restaurants now stands as a thriving part of the American experience. With 500-plus locations across the country, including 300 standalone restaurants, the brand remains a one-of-a-kind true original. Even its signature A&W Root Beer, served in an iconic frosty mug, is handcrafted at the restaurant. Today, that traditional approach is resonating strongly with consumers, who are looking for authentic brands. For more information, visit https://franchising.awrestaurants.com/.

Lodi students ready to hit the road with re-start of Thai exchange

There is nothing like being uprooted and immersed in a foreign culture, and for some of these Lodi High School students, just getting there will mean their first time stepping on an airplane.Lodi High School is resuming their Thai student exchange program, which has been running since 2008, but came to an end in 2019 following the arrival of COVID-19. Now program coordinators are collecting passports and making final checks before flying out on Nov. 9.What awaits the students will be a little different for each, because they wi...

There is nothing like being uprooted and immersed in a foreign culture, and for some of these Lodi High School students, just getting there will mean their first time stepping on an airplane.

Lodi High School is resuming their Thai student exchange program, which has been running since 2008, but came to an end in 2019 following the arrival of COVID-19. Now program coordinators are collecting passports and making final checks before flying out on Nov. 9.

What awaits the students will be a little different for each, because they will be placed with host families in different parts of Suphanburi, Thailand, but it will be an abrupt change from anything in Wisconsin. Social studies teacher and program advisor JP Fassbender explained that some host families have more rural living situations, and some more urban, but event though Suphanburi is known as rice-producing region and a rural area, it is still a city of over 800,000 people.

“We have an entire class called project-based learning, where we actually prepare the kids for their travels and they go through cultural knowledge-building, so they understand what they’re going to experience,” said Fassbender.

Even though none of the students will be fluent or conversational in Thai as they leave, the class lets them arrive with some useful Thai phrases for getting acquainted and making their way around while they are there. In addition, Fassbender explained, the host families, and the country on the whole are accommodating to American visitors, with over half of the population having some grasp of English, it being a compulsory subject in Thai schools.

For many travelers, encountering a wholly unfamiliar food culture can be a challenge, but again, Fassbender says, host families are prepared and elements of globalization can ease that transition.

“The first time I went in 2014, the first thing [the host family] did was they took me to the grocery store and they took me to the aisle with peanut butter, and bread, and said, ‘Do you need anything?’”

As well, American fast food staples such as McDonald’s, KFC, and Starbucks are can be found and are generally fashionable for young people in Thailand.

“If they struggle with the Thai food, their host families have a variety of options of where they can take them to get a slice of home.”

As some of these students will be leaving the country for the first time, in a few ways they will be jumping right into the deep end of international experience, first encountering jet lag in a country with a 12-hour time difference.

The key to that, according to Fassbender, is to just get going on the first day. After flying in, they will arrive at their hotel at about 3 a.m., and then the next day at 9 a.m., it is time to get breakfast and go.

“If you let them sleep during the day, it’s not a good thing…they bounce back pretty quickly, they are young teenagers,” said Fassbender. “To be honest they’re so excited, that first night we stay in the hotel, and the next day we have a brunch, and I’ve never had a student just not show up for breakfast.”

Once they are placed with their host families, they will be immersed and taking on busy schedules with school there, taking classes in addition to giving presentations on Lodi, Wisconsin, and the United States. Their class schedules are peppered with day trips, similar to Thai students visiting Lodi, who take seven to eight trips around the region while they are here.

In Thailand, destinations for the the Lodi students often include the ancient capital and UNESCO Heritage Site Ayutthaya, the Kanchanaburi World War II memorial, and the Golden Palace in Bangkok.

This year students are getting extra help when it comes to one the highlights of the trip. Earlier this summer, the Lodi School District received a donation from the Lodi Rotary Club, totaling $250 per student to cover expenses on a four-day weekend trip to Chiang Mai.

Whereas in-country costs are minimized, living with host families, the Chiang Mai weekend is a highpoint of the trip that comes with additional costs of hotel stays and entrance fees. This year, those costs will be covered as the students go to the northern part of the country for activities like elephant camps, night safari, a bamboo rafting ride, and visiting the King’s Gardens.

When it comes to the end of the trip on Dec. 2, Fassbender expects that there will be some tears, estimating between half to two-thirds of students are visibly emotional when it comes time to go home.

“I think what surprises them the most is that they come back with a lifelong family and friends,” said Fassbender, explaining that many of them stay connected in a private social media group with older former students now in their early 30s. “Many of them have gone back on their own personal expense and visited their family again in Thailand. Many of these Thai families come back here and visit families here.”

When they come back, they return to their project-based class with two goals that they will be working on with program co-coordinator and social studies teacher Kelsie Barlow over the following weeks: catching up on work for their classes here, and sharing their experiences with the community.

“They are expected to create presentations, because we want to disseminate our trip and share our trip experiences with the school board, the optimists, and other organizations,” said Fassbender of the re-integration process, honed over years of program experience. “When they come back, they are very talkative about their experience and share it with the student body.”

Fish Tales Restaurant in Lodi evacuated due to kitchen fire, owner looking to quick reopening

Diners at Fish Tales Restaurant were abruptly asked to leave just before dinner on Nov. 2, as smoke grew from the kitchen, but shortly after fire fighters were on scene the fire was contained with comparatively minimal damage.Fish Tales owner Dan Cunningham described it as a smoldering situation in an exterior wall outside the kitchen, in an interview on Thursday.“Today we met with the contractors, insurance company and all those kinds of things,” said Cunningham of the recovery effort, already in motion. “The...

Diners at Fish Tales Restaurant were abruptly asked to leave just before dinner on Nov. 2, as smoke grew from the kitchen, but shortly after fire fighters were on scene the fire was contained with comparatively minimal damage.

Fish Tales owner Dan Cunningham described it as a smoldering situation in an exterior wall outside the kitchen, in an interview on Thursday.

“Today we met with the contractors, insurance company and all those kinds of things,” said Cunningham of the recovery effort, already in motion. “The cleanup process has already started.”

Lodi Area Fire Department Assistant Chief Nate Sievers, who had just gotten home from work, received the call at about 4:47 p.m. and headed to the scene in the Town of Lodi, off State Highway 188.

“When I got on scene, nothing was showing from the outside but the doors were open and there was smoke coming from the inside of the facility,” said Sievers, who proceeded into the building for evacuation and investigation. “Once I got inside I could see some pretty significant smoke, so once we were sure we got everyone out safely...the engines showed up and we transitioned to an interior fire attack.”

The source of the fire was identified as behind the cooking appliances, inside the wall itself according to Sievers. “We had to change from an interior fire attack to attacking it from the outside wall.”

Cunningham emphasized his appreciation for the quick response of first responders including five fire departments and the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, who was first on the scene. Cunningham also specifically thanked the staff themselves for their response getting everyone out and arriving fire fighters.

According to Sievers, the Fish Tales staff were critical in preventing the fire from being much worse, making the call to 9-1-1 as quickly as they did. When he arrived, Sievers described the restaurant’s bar manager immediately approaching him to ask what he could do to help.

“Getting the page out early, that was a lifesaver because it was such a challenging area to get to,” said Sievers, describing a stainless steel backing to most industrial kitchen appliances, which was also holding the fire in. “We didn’t really find the fire until we started pulling siding off and pulling the outside wall apart.”

In the wall, firefighters could see that fire had burned some of the studs and had been moving toward the roof line. Firefighters removed an approximately 12-foot-wide by 8-foot-tall section of wall, though they were able to keep the fire to that general area.

“If that had gone for several minutes or an hour, it would have gone into the attic and it would have been a different story than what we have today,” said Sievers.

Although it had been inconvenient, Sievers said that it was also fortunate that the primary damage had been to the outside of the building, leaving the inside relatively unaffected, including much of the restaurant’s stock of frozen food left intact.

After the Lodi Area Fire Department, assistance also came from fire departments in Arlington, Prairie du Sac, Sauk City, and Sauk Prairie EMS assisting Lodi Area EMS.

The process, which Sievers described as “more physical” involved firefighters using under 500 gallons of water, meaning that the restaurant did not suffer significant water damage which is often the case elsewhere.

“I think everything is definitely fixable,” said Seivers. “We were ready for a worst-case scenario, but we were able to find it and confine it the best we could.”

After Cunningham arrived on the scene, he moved into recovery efforts in short order, according to Sievers.

“Everyone was safe with the quick reaction and the quick work that kept the damage to a minimum,” said Cunningham. “We’ll be closed this weekend and we have repairs scheduled for next week, and then we’ll give people an update from there.”

Cunningham updated customers on the restaurant’s Facebook page including a photo that a staff member had taken of the firefighters efforts that evening. While the restaurant is closed, Cunningham said that staff will also be added to the sister restaurant, Spring Creek Restaurant Restaurant and Bar in downtown Lodi.

“Because of their great reactions, we anticipate a smooth reopening,” said Cunningham.”

Honky Tonk Harvest will celebrate country music, country living

A local winery will be hosting a festival celebrating country music and country living next month to mark the end of the region’s harvest season.Akire Design & Productions will host the Honky Tonk Harvest at E2 Family Winery, 9301 Highway 12, on Nov. 5 from 3-9 p.m.Erika Quinones, Akire Design & Production founder, said she wanted to create and event that demonstrated what the harvest season was all about.“I realized not a lot of people understand what goes on during harvest and how this time of the y...

A local winery will be hosting a festival celebrating country music and country living next month to mark the end of the region’s harvest season.

Akire Design & Productions will host the Honky Tonk Harvest at E2 Family Winery, 9301 Highway 12, on Nov. 5 from 3-9 p.m.

Erika Quinones, Akire Design & Production founder, said she wanted to create and event that demonstrated what the harvest season was all about.

“I realized not a lot of people understand what goes on during harvest and how this time of the year it is critical to farmers and the community,” she said. “I am fortunate to have the connection and supporters to be able to launch this event in 2022.”

The Honky Tonk Harvest will feature several local country music artists, with cover band Locked-n-Loaded headlining the event.

Based in the East Bay, Locked-n-Loaded delivers a “true country experience,” performing chart-topping hits from artists of the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, including George Strait and Alan Jackson.

The band has opened for a variety of Nashville artists touring the West Coast, such as James Wesly, Josh Ward, and Georgia Satellites.

Several other musicians will be performing in a lead up to the headlining act, including Bobby Zoppi & The Corduroys, Crystal Image and Marilyn’s Ghost.

Bobby Zoppi & The Corduroys is rooted in its leader’s early roots in country music. Zoppi grew up listening to the likes of George Jones, Randy Travis and George Straight, but has also been influenced by Tim McGraw and Rascal Flatts.

He is currently a big fan of Florida Georgia Line, Kenny Chesney and Luke Brian amongst others. The Corduroys perform many old country hits as well as current country/rock on the radio and a few originals.

Formed in Lodi in 1968, Crystal Image is led by John Covert, a grand prize winner of the Nashville Music City Song Festival and a multi-finalist in the American Song Festival.

Covert's songs have been featured on “The Wonder Years,” “The Sopranos,” and “General Hospital,” among other programs.

The band has supported iconic musical acts including War, Tower of Power, Simon & Garfunkel, Chad & Jeremy, and Gary “U.S.” Bonds.

Marilyn’s Ghost is a duo comprised of Maralee & CJ, who perform a versatile array of new and classic country, soft and southern rock, and Americana.

Sarah Stokes of Dance with Sarah will also be on-site to provide line dancing between acts.

“With E2 Family Winery opening their property at the end of the harvest season, showcasing their wine, and giving me the opportunity to host my first country concert is paving the way for me to bring us together and grow,” Quinones said.

Born and raised in the San Ramon Valley, Quinones moved to Lodi in 2009 and said she immediately fell in love with the town.

She launched Akire Design & Production — a graphic design and production management company — and became an active Ambassador for the Lodi District Chamber of Commerce.

Quinones was recognized as Ambassador of the Year in 2017 for her efforts to support and promote new businesses.

She’s also contributed to the annual production of Joey Travolta's “Inclusion Film Summer Program” starting in 2019, by coordinating local services.

Brett Ehlers, co-owner of E2 Family Winery, said he was excited to partner with Quinones to bring the festival to Lodi.

“This is the perfect event for our community to celebrate the end to our harvest season,” he said. “With this event we are able to combine its passion for wine with its love of country music. We are also excited to be able to have the opportunity to introduce our incredible venue to the public and we can’t wait to have more like them.”

Lodi church ready for second year leading Lodi Christmas Lights Parade

Last year’s Lodi Christmas Lights Parade drew hundreds of people and now, in its second year of being led by Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, organizers are hoping for another great turnout with just a little less flying by the seat of their pants.“I think we have about 14 floats already registered to be in the parade,” said Pastor Scott Schertfeger. “And that’s the big thing: making sure there are a lot of people involved and a lot of organizations and a lot of groups are helping out to make this a fun ...

Last year’s Lodi Christmas Lights Parade drew hundreds of people and now, in its second year of being led by Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, organizers are hoping for another great turnout with just a little less flying by the seat of their pants.

“I think we have about 14 floats already registered to be in the parade,” said Pastor Scott Schertfeger. “And that’s the big thing: making sure there are a lot of people involved and a lot of organizations and a lot of groups are helping out to make this a fun activity for the community.”

Volunteers from the church’s Lodi and Leeds parishes have been helping put the parade together, scheduled for 6 p.m. on Dec. 10, and they are looking forward to the Lodi High School Chamber Choir coming to sing at the Goeres Park s’mores roast afterward.

The church is partnering with the Lodi Ag Fair which will also be hosting a drive-thru live nativity scene between 4 p.m. and 5:30 p.m., leading up to the parade. During the nativity organizers will also be collecting donations for Reach Out Lodi.

Last year the church was simply interested in participating when they found out that the event might not happen, according to church organizer Patrick Stankiewicz.

“The Rotary Club did it, but they just didn’t have enough folks to manage it,” said Stankiewicz. “So I was going to register with them and they said, ‘We probably can’t have a parade,’ and I said, ‘Well, we can’t have that.’ Because the kids love that and it’s a nice community event and it’s nice to bring everybody together. So we’re happy to sponsor it and coordinate it for everyone.”

The church had about 24 hours to get the permitting documents through city authorities before the deadline, and then took charge of the event. Stankiewicz explained that it was not a problem of starting from scratch, as Rotary members provided connections to get things going as well as some inroads via parish members with the Lodi Area Fire Department.

When it came time for the parade and following s’mores roast in Goeres Park, they had s’mores ingredient packs for about 300 people, according to Schwertfeger, which turned out to be not nearly enough, with about twice that many people attending.

“Someone, seeing the need, made a quick run to Piggly Wiggly and bought out the store of every kind of s’more making thing we could think of,” said Schwertfeger. “So we’re a little bit more prepared this time. We’re going to be putting together s’more packets for 500 people and we might have other things at the tables around the fire pits.”

In the park, they will also be adding a fourth fire pit, to give people more room for roasting. And this year they have also acquired a porta-potty, hopefully eliminating the issue of visitors eventually filling up nearby convenience stores to use their facilities.

“We were scrambling last year, but we took very good notes, which was helpful,” said Schwertfeger. “It’s been a busy year—a great year—with the grand opening that we had on Oct. 15, that was a lot of fun inviting the community to our new site for Gospel ministry. And then after that was done, we started getting ready for the parade.”

The parade will start on School Street and proceed on Clark Street, to Elizabeth Street, with floats eventually parking on Fair Street above Goeres Park.

“People can email [email protected] to register their float, even the day-of, by all means they can go right there on School Street and we’ll start lining up at 5:40 p.m. or so.”

As a matter of safety, anyone walking in the parade is asked to either carry a flashlight or wear lit or luminescent accessories in order to ensure visibility on the road.

Wrestling: Lodi has lofty goals for 2022-23

Replicating the success of the 2021-22 season would be an accomplishment in and of itself.However, the Lodi wrestling team has higher aspirations.“It’s an expectation for our program to contend for a team state title every year,” said Cody Endres, the Blue Devils’ head coach. “While we haven’t been to that level as of late, we’ve been extremely close.”“The standard is the standard,” said Endres, whose team unofficially finished second in Division 2 at the state ...

Replicating the success of the 2021-22 season would be an accomplishment in and of itself.

However, the Lodi wrestling team has higher aspirations.

“It’s an expectation for our program to contend for a team state title every year,” said Cody Endres, the Blue Devils’ head coach. “While we haven’t been to that level as of late, we’ve been extremely close.”

“The standard is the standard,” said Endres, whose team unofficially finished second in Division 2 at the state individual meet last year. “It’s going to remain extremely high. As a program we’re going to break through, it’s just a matter of time. Maybe this could be the year. That’s one of the many exciting parts about coaching. You don’t always know when, or what team, is going to help get your program over the hump.”

A year ago, Lodi went 5-0 in Capitol North Conference dual meets to win the league championships for duals. The Blue Devils also took first place at the North and South Capitol Conference Tournament.

Having a state champion back certainly helps the cause. Zane Licht won a state title at 152 pounds last season and is coming back for more in 2022-23. His presence will alleviate the loss of five letter winners.

“We lost an incredible senior class last year in Wyatt Ripp, Chandler Curtis, Parker Heintz, Brock Beyer, and Dean Finney from last year’s lineup,” said Endres. “Within that group we had 18 varsity letters, 11 conference titles, nine trips to the Individual State Tournament, and seven state placewinners. You just don’t replace a class like that.”

“For the first time since the 2001-2002 season, Lodi will have a state champion returning to the lineup in senior Zane Licht,” said Endres. “Zane went 50-1 last season and set the program record for most team points in a single season. Zane is a North Dakota State University commit and has goals to break the programs all-time single season takedown record this upcoming season. Zane is a returning team captain and the leader of this program.”

In all, 15 letter winners are back for Lodi, though. And Endres has them chomping at the bit to get going.

“We want our wrestlers to attack and be aggressive,” said Endres. “We want our guys who train extremely hard year round to use that conditioning to push the pace on our opponents. We want our opponents to know that whenever they wrestle a Lodi wrestler, it’s going to be a battle.”

Other key personnel for Lodi this season are senior Levi Ness, Owen Breunig and Mason Lane. Ness, a senior, is expected to compete at 106 or 113 and is a returning regional champion.

“Levi Ness had an incredible breakout season last year winning 35 matches with 16 of those coming by pin,” said Endres. “Levi also won a regional title and placed near the top of many individual tournaments he competed in. Having Levi at 106 helps jumpstart our team in duals and tournaments as he gets things rolling for us right away. He has improved tremendously each year in our program, and he will continue to this year as well.”

A senior, Breunig could wrestle at 132 or 138, and was a conference champion in 2021-22.

“Owen Breunig really wrestled well towards the middle and the end of the season last year after a tough start to the season,” said Endres. “Owen put in a lot of extra time and hard work during the season to improve to the level in which he was at. Owen finished the season with 32 wins and 20 of those came from pins. Owen will be motivated after placing fourth at individual sectionals last season. He’ll also be joined on the team by his younger brother this season, freshman Alex Breunig.”

And then there’s Lane, who is coming off a big year in football as the Blue Devils’ dual threat quarterback. The junior is also a returning regional champion.

“Mason Lane wrestled really hard for us last season as a sophomore at an upper weight,” said Endres. “Mason captured a regional title along with 27 wins and 14 pins. Mason also beat some ranked guys and will be looking to take a big jump this season. After having a phenomenal football season Mason will look to continue that success on the mat this season as a team leader within our program as he chases his team and individual wrestling goals.”

Loaded again, the Blue Devils are hoping for big things in 2022-23. Endres said Lodi expects to push for a conference title, while Sugar River “ … has a lot of talent returning and we know that their coaches work hard and put a lot of time into their program. They will certainly have a nice squad and we’re excited to dual them at home on December 22nd and also wrestle against them at the Conference tournament. Poynette always has some outstanding individuals, and we know they will bring back and develop some studs as well.”

“The goal is to always have a team that is led by a strong senior class,” said Endres. “Thankfully we have that this year as we return Zane Licht, Levi Ness, Owen Breunig, Evan Stevenson, Noah Johnson, TJ Mickelson, and Will Sadek. This collection of young men knows what it takes to be successful on and off the mat, and we’re going to expect them to be leaders and show the rest of the team the blueprint for success. These guys are hungry. They all have extremely high individual goals as well as lofty team goals. While the expectations are high, we as coaches know these guys will put in the necessary work to give themselves and our team a chance to achieve them.”

Boys' soccer program gaining momentum at Lodi

In his second year in charge of the Lodi boys’ soccer team, Callahan has the Blue Devils competing at a higher level, as they finished 7-7-4 overall last year, with a 1-1 mark in playoff games.He’s not into prognostications, but with 15 returning letter winners, including four starters on the attack and five defenders on the backline, Callahan believes Lodi will open some eyes in 2022.“I try not to make predictions,” said Callahan. “You never know how your team will fare against the others and how ...

In his second year in charge of the Lodi boys’ soccer team, Callahan has the Blue Devils competing at a higher level, as they finished 7-7-4 overall last year, with a 1-1 mark in playoff games.

He’s not into prognostications, but with 15 returning letter winners, including four starters on the attack and five defenders on the backline, Callahan believes Lodi will open some eyes in 2022.

“I try not to make predictions,” said Callahan. “You never know how your team will fare against the others and how much work each team and player put in during the offseason. Plus, anything can happen in sports. However, I think we have the talent and experience to make a lot of noise in conference and the playoffs. We just worry about ourselves and try to get better every day and our record should be a reflection of the work we put in.”

Already, that work is paying dividends, as the Blue Devils played Stoughton to a 0-0 in the season opener and gave DeForest – favored by many to win the Badger East Conference title this year – all it wanted before falling 3-1 on Aug. 25.

Lodi hopes that by keeping possession of the ball, the Blue Devils will be more dangerous offensively. They’ll look to pressure opponents on defense.

“Soccer is a pretty simple game,” said Callahan. “Like most teams, we try to stretch the field when we have the ball and make it as small as possible when we don’t have the ball. The game just turns into ‘who can do their job the best.’ With that being said, you can’t get scored on if you have the ball, so we look to hold onto the ball, possess it and make simple passes to create new angles for a threatening through ball. When we don’t have the ball, we look to close down quickly and win it back as soon as possible with emphasis on communication, cover defenders and covering as much green space as possible.”

Callahan has the “help wanted” sign out for strong finishers. He mentioned goal scoring as the Blue Devils’ biggest weakness.

“We had no double-digit goal scorer last season and only one player with over five goals,” said Callahan. “We really rely on our defense and goalkeeping to keep games close and see if we can find a goal or two throughout the 80 minutes. With that being said, most of our attack last year consisted of underclassmen, so we look to hopefully find the back of the net a bit more this season.”

In the first two games of the season, Lodi started three sophomores on the attack. One last played soccer in the fourth grade, according to Callahan.

“Still a young team but the Seniors are the backbone of a young squad,” said Callahan.

Having Kyle Hoffman in goal is a comfort. Lodi should be tough to score on in 2022.

“Our strength has to be our attitude and our defense/goal keeping,” said Callahan. “The second half of last year, we really tightened things up and were shutting out teams or allowing one goal at most. We started this year off on the same foot with a 0-0 draw versus Division 2 Stoughton.”

There’s a youth movement going on at Lodi, but the Blue Devils are maturing.

“We fielded a very young varsity team last year,” said Callahan. “We started a freshman in goal, had two freshmen attackers that played significant minutes, a junior and two sophomores starting on defense, one junior in midfield, plus another three sophomores that started and played big minutes in different areas of the field. We are just looking to build on a second-year coaching staff with an extremely young and talented team.”

What Callahan likes is what he describes as the “never say die” attitude of his team. It’ll serve them well in a tough Capitol Conference.

“Sugar River has to be the favorites for the foreseeable future,” said Callahan. “Three-time defending conference champs, it’s theirs until someone takes it from them. They field an extremely talented team and are very well coached. Wisconsin Dells and Lake Mills had some all-conference players and finished second and third last year in conference, so they should get the respect they deserve.”

“I have confidence in Lodi to move up the conference table but have never been much for predictions,” said Callahan. “There were games [last year] that we lost that going into I thought were ours for the taking and games we won that I thought we were David versus Goliath.”

Experienced singles players expected to lead Lodi girls' tennis in 2022

An experienced singles lineup is expected to lead the Lodi girls’ tennis team in 2022.It’s the doubles tandems that need seasoning.“We expect to have a solid season that we are building from last season,” said Joe Birkholz, now in his 10th year as the Blue Devils’ leader. “We are returning all four singles players and have some great young talent coming in at doubles. We also had a few upper classmen come out this season who will help bolster our doubles lineup.”Among the letter ...

An experienced singles lineup is expected to lead the Lodi girls’ tennis team in 2022.

It’s the doubles tandems that need seasoning.

“We expect to have a solid season that we are building from last season,” said Joe Birkholz, now in his 10th year as the Blue Devils’ leader. “We are returning all four singles players and have some great young talent coming in at doubles. We also had a few upper classmen come out this season who will help bolster our doubles lineup.”

Among the letter winners returning for Lodi in 2022 are Rachel Winters, Caroline Karls, Brook Bacon and Ava Balweg, as the Blue Devils look to replace Allison Larsen, Lexy Karls, Rylee Schneider, Mira Potter, Ava Glaser and Emma Steinberg.

Despite the losses due to graduation, Lodi has high hopes for the 2022 season.

“We are hoping to fit in near or at the top of conference,” said Birkholz. “We will have to play well against Watertown Luther Prep and be ready for Lake Mills. The conference is usually pretty competitive so anyone could come out on top.”

At last year’s Capitol Conference tournament, Lodi finished second to Watertown Luther Prep. Luther Prep is again favored to win the conference title.

“As always Luther Prep will have a large team with a good amount of talent,” said Birkholz. “Lake Mills is always competitive and will probably be looking to improve on last season. Mayville has a good program that has been building as well. Wayland (Academy) is always a wild card. I’m unsure of Columbus.”

According to Birkholz, who has gone 73-41 over his time at Lodi, Luther Prep is projected to take the league title, with Lodi and Lake Mills battling for second. Everything could be up for grabs, though.

“I think there could be any of four teams coming out on top this season,” said Birkholz.

A handful of Blue Devils appear ready to level up this season, according to Birkholz.

“Vivan Beld will be looking to leave her mark on the team this season,” said Birkholz. “She is an early standout. There are three other sophomores who are also looking to step up this season – Addison Crane, Tessa Pertzborn, and Ava Ballweg. Ava already made a huge impact last season.”

Depth might be an issue, but the talent is there, especially at the higher-level flights.

“We are a young team on the doubles side,” said Birkholz. “A couple are very inexperienced.”

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