TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Raritan, NJ

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 HRT For Men Raritan, NJ

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

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How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

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What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

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Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

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Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

 Hormone Replacement  Raritan, NJ

Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT Raritan, NJ, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Raritan, NJ

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in Raritan, NJ, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men Raritan, NJ

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men Raritan, NJ

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

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Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

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Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

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Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

 TRT Raritan, NJ

Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men Raritan, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT For Men Raritan, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Human Growth Hormone Raritan, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

 Ipamorelin Raritan, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number973-587-8638

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Latest News in Raritan, NJ

Somerset Student Places Ninth in Scripps National Spelling Bee

SOMERSET, NJ - Nitya Kathiravan, an eighth grader at Rutgers Preparatory School, placed ninth at the national level at this year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee in early June.“I have been on the spelling journey since second grade, and spent several hours a day preparing for this,” she said. “Through this journey, I competed in several competitions involving spelling and vocabulary.”Kathiravan, of Somerset, said she has came very close to going to nationals a few times since fourth grade, but she m...

SOMERSET, NJ - Nitya Kathiravan, an eighth grader at Rutgers Preparatory School, placed ninth at the national level at this year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee in early June.

“I have been on the spelling journey since second grade, and spent several hours a day preparing for this,” she said. “Through this journey, I competed in several competitions involving spelling and vocabulary.”

Kathiravan, of Somerset, said she has came very close to going to nationals a few times since fourth grade, but she missed the opportunity in other years because only the first place winners at the regional and state bees go to nationals.

“In 2019, I got my first opportunity at the Scripps National Spelling Bee where I had a close miss into the semifinals,” she said. “I was very much looking for the win at my regional this year as this was my last year of eligibility.”

The bee is open to students who are under 16 years old and have not yet finished eighth grade, as well as those who attend schools that are officially enrolled in the program for the academic year. Getting to the bee, Kathiravan said, requires competition in several bees along the way, including a classroom bee, then school one.

From there, students move on to the county spelling bee, which Kathiravan won for Somerset County at the Bridgewater Township Library.

The winners from regional bees make the journey to Washington D.C. to compete in the Scripps National Spelling Bee among between 225 and 250 students from the United States, Canada and a few other countries.

“The experience of this was extremely exciting,” Kathiravan said. “For the past two years, every spelling bee had been online, which took away most of the excitement and fun. There was no chance to meet new people, or engage in spelling related activities.”

But in this year’s bee, which was back in person, Kathiravan said she had the chance to meet up with people she had met at previous competitions, and make new friends.

“I thoroughly enjoyed my entire bee week, from registration, prelims, quarter finals, semifinals, finals and the awards banquet and after party,” she said.

This year’s bee began with 11 million students participating in classroom bees, narrowing down to 234 spellers in the national bee. After preliminaries, quarterfinals and semifinals, only 13 spellers made it to the finals, and Kathiravan was one of them.

“I placed ninth at the national level,” she said.

Kathiravan said she is an avid reader, and her love for language comes from her reading habits.

“After winning my school spelling bee and other local competitions for a few years at a younger age, I dreamed of participating in the Scripps,” she said. “I got serious when I was in second grade and I started with preparation with simple lists, and started understanding the roots and rules.”

As she progressed, Kathiravan said, she started mastering Latin, Greek, German and other language roots that cover a lot of different words from the dictionary.

“Many words are a combination of Latin and Greek roots or certain language patterns,” she said. “It is fun to do the anatomy exceptions, memorization of words that are not rule or root based.”

To prepare, Kathiravan said, she would make lists based on patterns, and marking trouble spots. She said she also has software to help her review words quickly based on the group that is created.

“In the later stages, I took help from a few coaches and my parents to quiz me on words from the dictionary to ensure I was well prepared for the bee,” she said. “Preparation for the bee required a lot of commitment and is a long journey.”

Kathiravan said she spent four to five hours during weekdays, and almost eight to 10 hours on the weekends, preparing.

“Since this is my last year, my preparation was even more rigorous,” she said. “In the end, fate plays a big role in this competition and hard work can only take you to some point.”

“I was not really nervous as I was well prepared and put in a lot of hard work,” she added. “Irrespective of the outcome, I knew that I learned a lot as part of this journey.”

With scoring star out, others shine to power Bridgewater-Raritan in T of C quarters

If you look up the word “efficient” in your favorite on-line dictionary, don’t expect to see a picture of the Bridgewater-Raritan lacrosse team.It won’t be there only because the Panthers were far too busy restructuring their offense around a crucial absence to pose for a photo.Fourth-seeded and eighth-ranked Bridgewater-Raritan was without its top goal scorer, injured junior Colin Kurdyla, yet overcame that loss with remarkable balance and marksmanship en route to a 15-8 victory over fifth-seeded and 15...

If you look up the word “efficient” in your favorite on-line dictionary, don’t expect to see a picture of the Bridgewater-Raritan lacrosse team.

It won’t be there only because the Panthers were far too busy restructuring their offense around a crucial absence to pose for a photo.

Fourth-seeded and eighth-ranked Bridgewater-Raritan was without its top goal scorer, injured junior Colin Kurdyla, yet overcame that loss with remarkable balance and marksmanship en route to a 15-8 victory over fifth-seeded and 15th-ranked Scotch Plains-Fanwood in the quarterfinals of the Tournament of Champions Saturday afternoon in Bridgewater.

Rutgers commit Brady Kurdyla, Colin’s senior brother, struck for three goals and three assists to surpass 100 points for this season and to propel an offense that buried 10 of 16 shots in the first half on the way to a nine-goal advantage and was 14 of 23 through three quarters to carry a 14-4 lead into the fourth period.

Junior attackman Tom Tremarco scored three goals and assisted on one, senior middie Rob Strano collected two goals and one assist, and junior middie DJ Vercade scored twice to send Bridgewater-Raritan (18-3) to its sixth straight victory and into the semifinals at 6 p.m. Wednesday in Rumson against second-seeded and fifth-ranked Rumson-Fair Haven. The Bulldogs handed Bridgewater a 12-4 loss in April.

“Playing without Colin is really weird, but when he goes down, other people have to step up, and that’s what we did,” Brady Kurdyla said. “Kids like Tommy Tremarco, kids like Matt Maciolek (1 goal, 2 assists), straight ballers. It was really good to see.”

Not for slow-starting Scotch Plains it wasn’t. The Raiders (19-4) won the program’s first Group 3 state title Wednesday night with an 11-2 victory over Shawnee, and showed signs of some fallout from that emotional milestone in the early going Saturday.

The Panthers also had good reason to let their emotions get the better of them without the younger Kurdyla (65 goals, 26 assists and also a Rutgers commit), who was injured during Wednesday’s Group 4 final against Southern, 8-6. But from the start, Bridgewater executed its offense deliberately and intelligently.

“The kids did a really good job of placing the ball and putting in good shots. We didn’t settle for crappy, no-angle shots. We got good shots,” said Bridgewater-Raritan head coach Chuck Apel. “We got to the middle and to spaces we wanted to shoot from, not trying to squeeze it down the alley with no room.”

The Panthers hit pipe on on their first two chances of the day, but then cranked in three of their next four shots in the first quarter to forge a 3-0 lead, and sank four in a row to begin the second quarter to extend that lead to 7-1 with 7:55 left in the half.

Vercade, who came in with six goals, gave the Panthers the initial lead with a gutsy dodge down the middle of the box with 6:31 to go in the opening quarter. Tremarco scored at the left pipe with 2:32 to go for a two-goal lead, and Kyle Holmes unloaded a blast from the left alley off a feed by Daine Kostes for a 3-0 lead with 29 seconds remaining in the quarter.

Strano built that lead to four goals when he converted a pass by Maciolek 45 seconds into the second quarter. Aidan Fairweather interrupted Bridgewater’s flow when he scored unassisted for Scotch Plains 1:02 later, but the Panthers responded with goals from Kurdyla (putting him at 100 points this season), Tremarco, Kurdyla again, Brandon Lewindowski and Kostes in the last 10:05 of the half to stretch the lead to 10-1.

In that first half, senior Mike Cuzzola won eight of 13 faceoffs. The Panthers utilized his control at the X, the patience of the offense, and the vigorous defensive efforts of Luke Cifuentes, Jonathan Mock, Nicholas Jankowski and Ryan Driscoll to limit Scotch Plains to eight shots in those 24 minutes. That’s a sobering development for a club that came in averaging 12.3 goals a game.

“Hats off to Bridgewater; they were the real deal today. They were prepared and they came out firing,” Scotch Plains head coach Nick Miceli said. “In the first half, you can’t get down in a hole against a team like that.”

Scotch Plains was in a deep hole, but not afraid to try digging its way back to the surface in the second half behind the playmaking of Mikey Kloepfer, with three goals and an assist in the second half, and fellow senior attackman Sandro Frias with two goals and one assist.

Bridgewater raised its lead to 11-1 on an extra-man goal by Alex Delierre 1:56 into the third quarter, but Kloepfer, Jake Monroy and Timmy Paprocki scored in succession to cut the deficit to 11:04 with 8:07 to go. Bridgewater closed out that period with three straight goals - Maciolek, Vercade and Kurdyla - for a 14-4 lead. Scotch Plains netted the four goals of the fourth.

“We just started doing the little things right,” Miceli said. “Second half we scrapped a lot better, had more possessions and we were putting the ball in the back of the cage.”

Trouble was, the Raiders were in a frenzied game of catch-up against a Bridgewater squad obviously determined to prove a degree of scoring balance that isn’t always reflected in the statistics. The steady Kurdyla brothers had accounted for 48 percent of the team’s 261 goals entering this game.

“We have a team here, not just one or two guys, and that’s what we emphasized,” Apel said. “They bought it and it was great. “If Colin wasn’t going to be here, they would have to step up. Tommy Tremarco played great, Alex (Delierre), Brady (Kurdyla), DJ Vercade all were great. It’s want you want to see.”

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NJ District Court Provides Guidance to Municipalities Seeking to Regulate Short-Term Rentals

The regulation of short-term rentals has become controversial in recent years as an increasing number of municipalities seek to enact ordinances. Litigation throughout the State of New Jersey has followed the adoption of such ordinances. Most recently, the District Court of New Jersey considered a challenge to an ordinance regulating short-term rentals in the Borough of Point Pleasant Beach. (Selvaggi v. Borough of Point Pleasant Beach (May 25, 2022)).The plaintiffs filed an action to temporarily restrain enforcement of an ordinance p...

The regulation of short-term rentals has become controversial in recent years as an increasing number of municipalities seek to enact ordinances. Litigation throughout the State of New Jersey has followed the adoption of such ordinances. Most recently, the District Court of New Jersey considered a challenge to an ordinance regulating short-term rentals in the Borough of Point Pleasant Beach. (Selvaggi v. Borough of Point Pleasant Beach (May 25, 2022)).

The plaintiffs filed an action to temporarily restrain enforcement of an ordinance prohibiting short-term rentals of less than seven days during the summer and less than one month in the winter. The Borough’s stated purpose in enacting the ordinance was to "regul[ate] [...] short term rentals," to prohibit "home sharing activities," such as Airbnb, and to "maintain the quality of life in residential neighborhoods[.]” The plaintiffs, California residents, own residential rental properties in the defendant municipality and filed an action contending that the ordinance violated equal protection and due process rights under the federal and state constitution, violated the Fair Housing Act, and was ultra vires under state law.

The court granted the plaintiff’s request to enjoin enforcement of the ordinance in a limited fashion. The Court only enjoined the enforcement of the ordinance’s overbroad definition of the term "rental.” The ordinance defined “rental” as including “the use of a residence by someone other than the owner even though no funds are transferred for said use.” The Court found that the definition of “rental” in the ordinance infringed on plaintiff’s right to privacy under the New Jersey Constitution. Relying on United Property Owners Ass'n of Belmar, the Court held that “a property owner's right to share his or her home with guests or visitors is within the panoply of their right of privacy under the New Jersey Constitution, and therefore, the Ordinance is subject to strict scrutiny.” The Court further found that an injunction regarding the definition of “rental” was appropriate because the plaintiffs had demonstrated a likelihood of success on the merits as to that issue. The Court stated, “Thus, applying the strict scrutiny standard, the Court finds that the definition of "Rental" is so untethered from the Borough's purpose in enacting the Ordinance that Plaintiffs have demonstrated a likelihood of success on the merits of their state substantive due process claim.” The Court’s injunction went a step further and mandated that the term "rental" in the ordinance is limited to "the use of a residence by someone other than the owner where funds are transferred for said use."

In issuing the injunction, the District Court has indicated an acceptable definition of “rental” to be used when a municipality regulates short-term rentals via ordinance.

Tara St. Angelo, Esq. concentrates her practice primarily in the areas of municipal and land use law. She was named to the NJ Super Lawyers Rising Stars list for State, Local and Municipal law by Thomson Reuters in 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, and 2021. Contact Ms. St. Angelo at Gebhardt & Kiefer, PC at 908-735-5161 or via email.

Editor's Note: This advertorial content is being published by TAPinto.net as a service for its marketing partners. For more information about how to market your business on TAPinto, please email [email protected]

NJ wildfire burns an astounding 12,000+ acres as smoke spreads farther

As firefighters get a better handle on the Wharton State Forest fire that started on Sunday, more of New Jersey will smell the smoke and see the haze on Tuesday.The fire that started Sunday morning in a remote area of Wharton State Forest continues to burn Tuesday morning and has consumed 12,000 acres of forest as of Monday night, according to the New Jersey Forest Fire Service.The fire is on track to be New Jersey's largest since a fire that charred 14,000 acres near the Warren Grove firing range in 2007.Firefighters ha...

As firefighters get a better handle on the Wharton State Forest fire that started on Sunday, more of New Jersey will smell the smoke and see the haze on Tuesday.

The fire that started Sunday morning in a remote area of Wharton State Forest continues to burn Tuesday morning and has consumed 12,000 acres of forest as of Monday night, according to the New Jersey Forest Fire Service.

The fire is on track to be New Jersey's largest since a fire that charred 14,000 acres near the Warren Grove firing range in 2007.

Firefighters have contained 70% of the fire and, depending on the wind Tuesday, could be close to 100% contained by day's end. But a shift in the wind means more of New Jersey will be aware of the fire.

"The wind direction is shifting today, from northerly to southerly. So more of New Jersey will probably experience the smoky smell, hazy sky, and poor air quality," New Jersey 101.5 Chief Meteorologist Dan Zarrow said.

Air quality in Toms River reached unhealthy levels, according to the NJ DEP air monitoring website.

The wind shift also brings an increase in humidity, which will help firefighting efforts. Heavy rain on Wednesday night will further help put the fire out once and for all.

New Jersey Forest Fire Service Chief Greg McLaughlin on Monday said the cause of the fire has been determined not to be natural. But it remains under investigation whether or not the fire was intentionally set.

Route 206 remains closed from Chew Road to Atsion Road and Route 542 is still closed from Green Bank Road to Columbia Road.

Basto Village's hiking and mountain bike trails are closed until further notice along with the Mullica River trail and boat launch. Fifty people, who were mostly campers and visitors, were forced to leave the area affected by the fire.

The Atsion Recreation Area, Mullica River Campground and Lower Forde Campground will stay closed on Tuesday.

Pinelands Adventures, where 18 structures are threatened, has suspended kayak and canoe trips.

"We do not have any expected timeframe as to when trips can safely resume, and ask for your understanding as we take this day by day and the fire is contained," the campground wrote on its Facebook page. "Thank you to all of the fire and emergency services for the hasty response and continued battle."

Dan Alexander is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

County Provides Update on Recycling Prices, Processes

BRIDGEWATER, NJ - Somerset County recently updated Bridgewater Township officials on matters pertaining to recycling in the municipality.Somerset County Director of Public Affairs Paul McCall addressed the township at the May 16 meeting, discussing how the county collects recyclables in a myriad of ways.“It’s still a dual-stream system,” he said of Bridgewater’s recycling.He said the county now puts out recycling totes that it later picks up, instead of the older blue buckets. The county also uses...

BRIDGEWATER, NJ - Somerset County recently updated Bridgewater Township officials on matters pertaining to recycling in the municipality.

Somerset County Director of Public Affairs Paul McCall addressed the township at the May 16 meeting, discussing how the county collects recyclables in a myriad of ways.

“It’s still a dual-stream system,” he said of Bridgewater’s recycling.

He said the county now puts out recycling totes that it later picks up, instead of the older blue buckets. The county also uses roll-off containers in picking up items such as cardboard, which he said is the most valuable recycling product.

The totes enable recyclables to stay dry, and to get better value for them in domestic markets, including paper, glass, various plastics, aluminum, tin and steel.

McCall said some municipalities still employ single-stream recycling, in which recyclables of all types are mixed together or co-mingled, which can lead to contamination of the items.

The county recycles paper and newspaper, which McCall called the “cleanest recycling in New Jersey,” with that material usually going uncontaminated. Loose fibers and any bailed material are shipped away.

As for pricing, McCall said the market is volatile, and that vendors bid on recycled materials. Funding sources include municipalities and commodities (recyclable materials), along with state recycling grants.

Monies generated are used to pay such areas as operating expenses, along with recycling staff salaries.

Conditional costs, along with the recycling totes, are paid for by the county, in a 50/50 share with the municipalities, plus recycling employee benefits. The county also has recycling contracts with 20 of its 21 municipalities.

Councilman Howard Norgalis asked who actually owns recyclables, once they are put out for collection.

McCall said the county hasn’t yet pressed charges against anyone who may have gone through other’s recyclables, but that recyclable items officially become county property once they are put out on the curb.

Councilman Timothy Ring said Bridgewater residents always ask when they will be getting totes. McCall said it is a four-year rollout program that hasn’t been helped by the coronavirus pandemic.

“COVID did hurt us,” he said.

McCall said it is now a matter of getting vehicles, hopefully within a year’s time, as totes are not as difficult to obtain as vehicles. He also mentioned that the county requires 30 vehicles in all to handle its recycling efforts, including training.

As for totes, there are two types available, one with a yellow lid that is used for paper-type recycling, and another with a green lid for glass-type collection. Some entities might require larger totes, which are available up to 96 gallons.

Ring asked how much recycling material is usually discarded.

McCall responded that the county only processes paper and cardboard, and can’t bail and stockpile those materials. He added that Keasbey, located in Middlesex County, has a warehouse to ship out materials.

“Cardboard and paper, you get paid for,” said McCall, although he admitted that single-stream recycling takes up time.

Council vice president Michael Kirsh said that he doesn’t have exact figures, but that the (cost) split between municipality and county is almost 50%. He said the tote system works much better “without a doubt.”

McCall said the county is paid to dispose of commodities, about $75 to $90 per ton, although there is no end market. He also said that recycling legislation in China the last few years had led to a “nosedive” outside domestic markets.

McCall said he hopes things will balance out if the market stays strong, and that the county doesn’t want to raise municipal rates “unless absolutely necessary.”

Kirsh brought up the county’s administrative recycling fee of $90, which has been a sticking point for the council for some time. He asked for an explanation, and why the county couldn’t absorb such an “illogical” cost.

McCall said that, to submit recycling tonnage to the state for reimbursement, a sign-off has to be done by a recycling professional. He said the county had signed off for some municipalities, who worked about two to three hours at an hourly rate for each.

“I can understand where it’s an irritant,” said McCall of the fee. “It’s something we can revisit, and work together.”

He said he also thought it was a service the county could offer to municipalities, without realizing it might be a thorny issue for some.

Ring said the county is charging Bridgewater a fee to audit paperwork that the township itself supplies. McCall said the tonnage goes back to the municipalities, including rubber and tires, and that the county does not keep the fees.

Kirsh asked when the recycling rates were set. McCall replied it was a period of one year, from October to October, to give townships time to prepare to put them into their municipal budgets.

“We’re looking at every dollar,” said Kirsh, who hoped to see a formal resolution as soon as possible. “The earliest advance notice is valuable.”

McCall said the county has tried to keep the rate the same, and might have waited a little too long in trying to do so.

“We will definitely try to get a resolution out earlier this year,” he said.

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