TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Somerset, NJ

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 HRT For Men Somerset, NJ

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

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How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

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What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

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Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

 TRT Somerset, NJ

Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

 Hormone Replacement  Somerset, NJ

Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT Somerset, NJ, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Somerset, NJ

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in Somerset, NJ, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men Somerset, NJ

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men Somerset, NJ

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

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Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

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Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

 Sermorelin Somerset, NJ

Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

 TRT Somerset, NJ

Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men Somerset, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT For Men Somerset, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
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What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

 Ipamorelin Somerset, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number973-587-8638

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Latest News in Somerset, NJ

As student depression and anxiety soars, N.J. lawmakers demand more from schools

With suicide the second most common cause of death among college students, state lawmakers just voted for bills that would require more faculty and staff to be trained to recognize signs of mental illness, and would make more funding available to expand treatment services on campus.In a busy voting session Thursday at the Statehouse in Trenton, the state Assembly also passed a bill that would focus more attention on troubled students in high school and middle school, by allowing school counselors to refer them to private counselors....

With suicide the second most common cause of death among college students, state lawmakers just voted for bills that would require more faculty and staff to be trained to recognize signs of mental illness, and would make more funding available to expand treatment services on campus.

In a busy voting session Thursday at the Statehouse in Trenton, the state Assembly also passed a bill that would focus more attention on troubled students in high school and middle school, by allowing school counselors to refer them to private counselors.

Pandemic-related isolation and upheaval has exacerbated mental health problems among young people that had already been on the rise. A survey of 3,200 students by Active Minds, a national nonprofit said 20% of college students and 12% of high school students reported their mental health had “significantly worsened” in 2020.

A 2021 study said suicide — the second-most common cause of death among college students — appears to be a growing threat in the COVID era. The authors concluded college students hospitalized for COVID “should be screened for suicidal thoughts and behaviors subsequent to discharge, particularly if they have pre-existing suicidal ideation.”

By a 74-0 vote with four abstentions, the state Assembly approved the “College Mental Health Services Act,” which would create a fund of public and private dollars that public colleges can apply for to expand treatment and public education efforts on campus.

“Supporting New Jersey’s college students means doing more than just putting them on the path to academic success,” said Assemblywoman Sadaf Jaffer, D-Somerset, a prime sponsor of the bill.

“The College Mental Health Services Grant Program will improve access to potentially life-saving resources by eliminating barriers that stand in the way of students seeking treatment. Mental health concerns deserve the same level of urgency as any other illness or condition, and we cannot let staffing shortages or long waits prevent students from getting help when they need it.”

Assemblyman Gerry Scharfenberger, R-Monmouth, was one of the four abstentions, explaining he did not support a provision in the bill (A3713) that required colleges to post on their websites the ratio of students who seek mental health services to mental health professionals at the institution, and the types of treatment services provided.

He said he worried the disclosure would put the college in a bad light. “Will that sway people,” Scharfenberger asked, if one college has far more students seeking treatment? He said he “doesn’t see the value of posting numbers.”

By a vote of 76-0, the Assembly also approved a bill (A1176) that requires all colleges in the state to implement suicide prevention programs and raise awareness of the mental health services available.

Colleges and universities would have to conduct a public awareness campaign about depression and suicide and reducing the stigma around seeking treatment, annually train resident assistants who work in college dorms on how to recognize the warning signs of depression and suicide and to respond to students experiencing a crisis, and post crisis hotline numbers in each dorm, library and student center.

The Assembly also approved legislation that would allow school counselors to refer students for mental health treatment.

The bill (A4086) passed by a vote of 78-0. But some testified against the bill at an Assembly Education Committee hearing on June 9, saying it threatened to interfere with parental autonomy.

“We’re not for the government getting involved with our relationship with our children,” said a parent who testified at the hearing remotely. “It seems schools and the government are getting involved in the parent-child relationship too much. Parents can find counselors for their children.”

Assemblywoman Pamela Lampitt, D-Camden, the committee chairwoman and the bill’s prime sponsor, said the intent is to help parents, “who are busy and sometimes don’t have the wherewithal to find a professional to use, somebody outside the system.” Parents would be notified should a school psychologist or counselor make a referral, according to the bill.

“This bill is (intended) to provide information to families who have the option to find professionals outside school and get immediate care if they want it,” Lampitt said.

Peg Kinsell, policy director at SPAN, the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network, testified at the hearing that she has seen mental health needs escalate over the last two years. Call volume has increased “30-fold,” and “a 15-minute call now takes an hour for families because of the many layers of the problems now.”

Kinsell expressed concern about the lack of professionals available, and how the shortage may contribute to a prolonged absence if a child is temporarily sent home for mental health reasons.

“Nobody is collecting data on how many kids are out of school on this, there’s no accountability about days missed, and we’re really concerned about it,” Kinsell said.

“Saving Charlie,” a special report published by NJ Advance Media on March 6 about a suicidal teenager in Central Jersey and his family’s struggles to find help, highlighted the barriers to treatment, including waiting lists and teens languishing in emergency rooms. The Senate Education Committee held a hearing soon after, in March to discuss how the pediatric behavioral health system is “overburdened” and “in crisis.”

The three bills the Assembly approved Thursday have yet to be acted on by the Senate.

If you are in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text TALK to 74174.

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Somerville: Juneteenth Event Reconciles History with Today's Realities

Olivia Y. Altidor of Hillsborough performs a reading of her original poem, "A Letter to My Future Self" at Thursday's Juneteenth celebration in Somerville.SOMERVILLE, NJ - Lessons in history were delivered by performers and lawmakers during Thursday's commemoration of Juneteenth hosted by the Somerset Cultural and Heritage Commission on the steps of the historic Somerset County Courthouse.The theme of Thursday's event was"Acknowledging the Past with an Eye Towards Our Shared Future."J...

Olivia Y. Altidor of Hillsborough performs a reading of her original poem, "A Letter to My Future Self" at Thursday's Juneteenth celebration in Somerville.

SOMERVILLE, NJ - Lessons in history were delivered by performers and lawmakers during Thursday's commemoration of Juneteenth hosted by the Somerset Cultural and Heritage Commission on the steps of the historic Somerset County Courthouse.

The theme of Thursday's event was"Acknowledging the Past with an Eye Towards Our Shared Future."

Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when Union General Gordon Granger rode to Galveston, Texas and informed enslaved people of their freedom as guaranteed by the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation.

Live performances featured an eclectic blend of poetry, jazz, spirituals, and contemporary music, including international soprano Dr. Sonya Headlam of Princeton who performed “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” and the Jonathan Ware Quartet premiering selections from “Talking Suite.”

Additional entertainment included poetry readings by Hillsborough student Olivia Altidor and Ssanyu Lukoma, and the premiere of an original Juneteenth dramatic skit, titled “To Be Free,” written by playwright Ryan Kilpatrick and performed by students of the Allegra School of Music and Arts in Hillsborough.

A performance by Alexander Simone and Whodat? followed the Juneteenth event on Division Street. Simone is the grandson of legendary Nina Simone.

Somerville Mayor Dennis Sullivan offered a welcome to the gathering seated on the courthouse lawn. Shanel Robinson, director of the Somerset County Commissioners, offered her reflections on the significance of Juneteenth.

"Juneteenth, of course, celebrates of the end of slavery in America more than 150 years ago," Robinson said. "But more than that, it provides an opportunity to reassess our deeply imperfect history, and to move forward, together."

Gov. Phil Murphy signed legislation in 2020 declaring Juneteenth a state and public holiday. President Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act on June 17, 2021 – the same day that Somerset County held its inaugural Juneteenth celebration.

New Jersey Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-12th) was to have been the keynote speaker, but had to cancel after she tested positive for COVID-19.

"Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman has distinguished herself as a truth-teller about American history and the central role played by African-Americans over the last four centuries,” Robinson said.

In April, Watson Coleman sponsored the National Liberty Memorial Preservation Act that would recognize the role of African American and Indigenous troops who helped win the American Revolution with a monument near the Washington Mall. The legislation passed the House of Representatives and is awaiting a vote in the U.S. Senate.Immediately after the Juneteenth celebration.

Robinson's reflections offered at the opening of Thursday's program follow:

"Welcome, everyone, to Somerset County’s 2nd annual Juneteenth celebration. I am Shanel Robinson, Commissioner Director of Somerset County. That means I am the most senior elected official of our county of 345,000 people, and the first African American to hold this position.

"As we stood on these steps of this historic courthouse one year ago, President Joe Biden’s signature literally was still wet on Federal legislation to create this important national holiday.

"Juneteenth, of course, celebrates of the end of slavery in America more than 150 years ago. But more than that, it provides an opportunity to reassess our deeply imperfect history, and to move forward, together.

"The reminders of our imperfect history are all around us.

"A half mile south of here is the Somerville New Cemetery, where close to a dozen veterans of the Union Army’s Colored Troops are buried, heroes who helped bring an end to the enslavement of African Americans and save our union. Their sacrifices made today’s celebration possible.

"A half-mile west of here is the Wallace House, where George Washington made his Revolutionary War headquarters in 1779. His host family, the Wallaces, owned enslaved African Americans who worked in that home before and after Washington’s stay.

"These are stories that have too often been left out of the larger story of American history, but they are fundamental to that history.

"George Washington’s Continental Army was approximately 25% non-white by the time they marched through Somerset County in 1781 on their way to victory in Yorktown, Virginia. That story, along with the story of Juneteenth, are important for us to teach in our schools.

"Our program today will include a diversity of talent, including many young people who are learning about our past as they prepare to build our future. I’d like to thank our Somerset County Cultural & Heritage Commission, and particularly Vice President Donnetta Johnson, for creating today’s event. During this event, you’ll have a chance to meet many of Somerset County’s elected leaders and hear their testimony to the importance of building a more inclusive, equal, and free nation.

"That is the spirit of our first song, “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” a traditional African American hymn that has become a Black National Anthem. As a woman of Faith, it is a deeply meaningful song to me that I have sung hundreds of times. It will be performed today by Dr. Sonya Headlam who encourages us to join her. You’ll find the lyrics on the back of your program."

Sullivan's remarks follow:

"Welcome to Somerville as we gather in fellowship to celebrate Juneteenth 2022. One hundred and fifty-seven years ago news of President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation finally reached the enslaved people of Texas, exactly nine hundred days since that watershed document had been signed.

"For over eighty years, the promises set forth in the Declaration of Independence,the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights officially excluded millions of Americans held in bondage. Too many unofficial obstacles to true equality remain to this day.

"The Emancipation Proclamation redefined the ongoing conflict from a war for union into a war for freedom, setting in motion a drive for equality and civil rights that continues even today.

"Let us reflect on the progress that has been made and rededicate ourselves to the hard work yet to come. From Washington, DC to Galveston, TX to Somerville, NJ may our voices be heard as we trumpet freedom to those whose future we ensure today."

Christiana Nwachuku claims 100 dash title at the Meet of Champions, 2022

As Christiana Nwachuku approached the starting blocks for the 100-meter dash at the Meet of Champions on Saturday afternoon, she kept repeating a message to herself.Get out fast, but run faster to the finish.Nwachuku, among the contenders in the event at Franklin, didn’t have a great start in the trials earlier in the day and entered the finals win the second-fastest time behind Montclair’s Kiya Lawson.The finals, however, were a different story. Nwachuku started out fast and led wire-to-wire, finishing in 11...

As Christiana Nwachuku approached the starting blocks for the 100-meter dash at the Meet of Champions on Saturday afternoon, she kept repeating a message to herself.

Get out fast, but run faster to the finish.

Nwachuku, among the contenders in the event at Franklin, didn’t have a great start in the trials earlier in the day and entered the finals win the second-fastest time behind Montclair’s Kiya Lawson.

The finals, however, were a different story. Nwachuku started out fast and led wire-to-wire, finishing in 11.93 to claim the title. She was the only runner to break 12 seconds and she clipped considerable time off her trials performance (12.08).

“It’s really nice,” Nwachuku, a University of Pennsylvania recruit, said. “I wanted to add the 100 Meet of Champs win to my collection. It feels really good.”

Nwachuku ran slightly faster last week at the Non-Public A meet, clocking a personal record of 11.7, but she navigated chilly temperatures and circling wind to win gold on Saturday in the final meet of the year.

“I was literally just screaming at myself to get out fast, but run faster,” she said. “That was my little mantra on the line. And it worked.”

Lawson, who ran 12.06 in the prelims to earn the top time, closed hard on Nwachuku and finished second in 12.00. It wasn’t until she crossed the finish line that Nwachuku saw just how close she was.

“I actually didn’t (realize how close she was) until I crossed the line and it was like, ‘Oh my god, you’re really close.’ That was nice. She’s an amazing person.

“I think I’ve run against her once or twice before, so she was kind of familiar competition. I knew I needed to, not necessarily get out fast, but keep going fast. She speed up at the end. I was nerve-wracked but I was able to pull through.”

100-METER DASH FINALS

1-Christiana Nwachuku, Kent Place, 11.93

2-Kiya Lawson, Montclair, 12.00

3-Gianna Mangili, Mount St. Dominic, 12.04

4-Sanai Bryant, Dumont, 12.33

5-Nyla Felton, North Plainfield, 12.36

6-Naylah Jones, Timber Creek, 12.46

7-Oluwatamilore Adedeji, DePaul, 32.65

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After coming up just short, PH’s Zuckerman wins gold in boys pole vault at 2022 Meet of Champions

After clearing the bar and securing the gold medal at the Meet of Champions on Saturday, Max Zuckerman turned to his coach and screamed:“It was taken from me too many times!”After the 2020 MOC was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic followed by a second-place finish last year, Zuckerman had finally made it to the top.The Pascack Hills senior cleared 15 feet, 6 inches to secure a gold medal in pole vault at the 2022 Track and Field Meet of Champions at Franklin High School, securing his place atop the pod...

After clearing the bar and securing the gold medal at the Meet of Champions on Saturday, Max Zuckerman turned to his coach and screamed:

“It was taken from me too many times!”

After the 2020 MOC was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic followed by a second-place finish last year, Zuckerman had finally made it to the top.

The Pascack Hills senior cleared 15 feet, 6 inches to secure a gold medal in pole vault at the 2022 Track and Field Meet of Champions at Franklin High School, securing his place atop the podium and adding his name to the history books.

“I had worked too hard not to make that jump,” said Zuckerman on his mindset after winning the gold. “I just remembered the times that I was beaten, and I pushed myself a little bit harder this time.”

“There’s always been somebody before him,” said Pascack Hills head coach Ross Koehler on his standout senior earning the gold after years of competing at a high level. “Now, it’s his time to shine, and he came through.”

After clearing 15-6 to edge out Hillsborough senior Kevin Sullivan for the gold, the bar was lifted a full six inches to 16 feet even.

Zuckerman, looking much more relaxed than he did on his first-place-winning vault, cleared the bar in his first attempt, setting a new personal record, as well as a new county record and school record to cap his career at the high-school level in impressive fashion.

Prior to his state-title winning vault, Zuckerman was shifting the weight back and forth on his feet, closing his eyes and speaking quietly to himself -- clearly attempting to get into the zone.

“That’s usually how I focus myself up,” said Zuckerman on his immense level of focus at the time. “Take some deep breaths, say a few words to myself... I just close my eyes and try to envision myself going over the bar.”

When going for 16′, the senior appeared much more comfortable, maintaining the demeanor of a vaulter perhaps in training, not one that was going for a trio of records at the MOC.

“As soon as I hit 16, the pressure kind of went away,” said Zuckerman on looking much more relaxed prior to attempting his PR. “I kind of just moved on. I didn’t even realize we went to 16, I just jumped as if it was the same bar. I didn’t change much, I just kind of relaxed, and I think that helped me clear it on the first attempt.”

Despite the fact that the boys vaulters were going into a significant and steady wind, the Northeastern commit went for a new state record, bumping the bar up to 16 feet, 5 inches but ultimately unable to clear it.

The state record was set last season by East Brunswick’s Brian McSweeney, who cleared 16-4.75 to break a record that had stood since 1980, when Will Nesbitt of Millburn cleared 16-4.

BOYS POLE VAULT RESULTS

1-Max Zuckerman, Pascack Hills, 16-0

2-Kevin O’Sullivan, Hillsborough, 15-0

3-Matthew Aono, Ridgewood, 14-0

4-Brian O’Sullivan, Hillsborough, 14-0

5-Luke Gnospelius, Ridgewood, 14-0

6-Tyler Raimondi, Toms River South, 13-6

7-Damiam Scouloukas, Hunterdon Central, 13-6

8-Robert George, Montville, 13-0

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Gas prices near record highs (again). See costs in every N.J. county.

Gas prices are once again nearing record highs just in time for the busy travel weekend for the Memorial Day holiday.The average price for a regular gallon of gas in New Jersey is $4.761, according to AAA. That’s fractions of a penny lower than the $4.766 record set on May 20.Don’t expect prices to ease up this summer, experts told NJ Advance Media. It’s not a question of if, but of when, New Jersey will see average gas prices ...

Gas prices are once again nearing record highs just in time for the busy travel weekend for the Memorial Day holiday.

The average price for a regular gallon of gas in New Jersey is $4.761, according to AAA. That’s fractions of a penny lower than the $4.766 record set on May 20.

Don’t expect prices to ease up this summer, experts told NJ Advance Media. It’s not a question of if, but of when, New Jersey will see average gas prices top $5 a gallon.

Gas is most expensive in Somerset County, where a gallon of regular will run you $4.856, and cheapest in Sussex County at $4.672.

Those prices are up from earlier this month. On average, gas is about 28 cents a gallon pricier than on May 9, according to AAA’s figures.

New Jersey also saw one of the highest singe-week jumps in price - 16 cents - this week compared to other states, AAA said.

Despite rising prices, demand is also increasing, AAA said. Demand typically increases during the summer months, when more families are traveling.

The rise in gas prices is also attributed to the cost of crude oil, which spiked when Russia invaded Ukraine in February.

“Gasoline is $1.05 more than it was on February 24, when Russia invaded Ukraine,” Andrew Gross, a AAA spokesperson, said in a statement. “That sent shock waves through the oil market that have kept oil costs elevated.”

Apps like GasBuddy can help you find the best prices near you, while apps like TollGuru and MapQuest can help you calculate just how costly that drive is going to be. And there are ways to keep your gas costs down, like taking fewer trips and making sure your tires have enough air.

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Katie Kausch may be reached at [email protected]. Tell us your coronavirus story or send a tip here.

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