TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in The Meadows, FL

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 HRT For Men The Meadows, FL

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

 Human Growth Hormone The Meadows, FL

How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

 Ipamorelin The Meadows, FL

What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

 Sermorelin The Meadows, FL

Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

 TRT The Meadows, FL

Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

 Hormone Replacement  The Meadows, FL

Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT The Meadows, FL, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy The Meadows, FL

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in The Meadows, FL, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men The Meadows, FL

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men The Meadows, FL

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

 Human Growth Hormone The Meadows, FL

Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

 Ipamorelin The Meadows, FL

Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

 Sermorelin The Meadows, FL

Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

 TRT The Meadows, FL

Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men The Meadows, FL

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT For Men The Meadows, FL

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Human Growth Hormone The Meadows, FL

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

 Ipamorelin The Meadows, FL

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number973-587-8638

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Latest News in The Meadows, FL

Business briefs, New businesses, People on the move

CHAMBER EVENT THURSDAY: The Youngstown / Warren Regional Chamber will host Good Morning, Trumbull! 7:30 to 9 a.m. Thursday at the The Grand Pavilion, 9519 E. Market St., Warren.The cost is $25 per member and $35 per nonmember.The keynote speaker is Patti Zullo, senior director, Smart City Solutions for Spectrum and Charter Communications. Also planned to speak are Rick Rajaie, vice president of operations for Foxconn North America, and Trumbull County Commissioner Frank Fuda.YSU RECOGNIZES ALUMNI: The Warren P. Williamso...

CHAMBER EVENT THURSDAY: The Youngstown / Warren Regional Chamber will host Good Morning, Trumbull! 7:30 to 9 a.m. Thursday at the The Grand Pavilion, 9519 E. Market St., Warren.

The cost is $25 per member and $35 per nonmember.

The keynote speaker is Patti Zullo, senior director, Smart City Solutions for Spectrum and Charter Communications. Also planned to speak are Rick Rajaie, vice president of operations for Foxconn North America, and Trumbull County Commissioner Frank Fuda.

YSU RECOGNIZES ALUMNI: The Warren P. Williamson College of Business Administration at Youngstown State University will present its 2022 Outstanding Alumni Awards at a reception Oct. 14 at Williamson Hall on campus.

Awardees are Sue Stricklin, senior vice president of marketing at Simon Roofing; Henry Gomez, senior politics reporter at NBC News; Eric Pittman, program division director at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; and Corey Patrick, director of the Entrepreneurial Services Program at the Youngstown Business Incubator.

The reception begins at 6 p.m. with the presentation of awards at 7 p.m. To attend, make reservations online by Sept. 30 at www.ysu.edu/alum

nireservation. Cost is $50. More information at 330-941-3064.

FIRM NAMED AMONG BEST: Cohen & Company, which has an office in Youngstown, has been named one of the 50 best accounting firms in the U.S. by INSIDE Public Accounting for 2022.

Chosen from nearly 600 firms across the U.S. and Canada that participated in IPA’s 32nd Annual Survey and Analysis of Firms, each winner was ranked on more than 50 metrics. Key areas included producing superior results while planning for long-term sustainability and growth, and offering both clients and staff alike a successful future.

VEC AWARDS SCHOLARSHIPS: VEC Inc. in Girard, an electrical and general contracting provider, has announced its 2022 scholarship winners, all local students: Evan Davies, Lauren Meadows and Haley Protiva. Each will receive a $500 scholarship.

Davies is attending Ohio University with an anticipated major in finance. Meadows plans to attend Ohio State University to major in choral music education and Protiva’s plans include attending the University of Tampa with an anticipated major in nursing.

HD DAVIS CPAs NO. 3 ON LIST: For the second year in a row, HD Davis CPAs in Liberty has been named a Best Firm to Work For by Accounting Today. This year it received placement as the No. 3 small firm to work for in the nation.

Accounting Today is a national publication recognized as one of the top accounting publications. Each year, it hosts a survey sent out to firms across the nation and reviews information like company policies, procedures and diversity. They also collect employee satisfaction regarding benefits and workplace culture. With this information, Accounting Today then recognizes the top firms to fill out the survey.

COMPANY UNVEILS NEW LOOK: Girard-based Altronic LLC has rebranded itself with a new logo and color palette to showcase the company’s modern and innovative technical capabilities. The logo A with a lightning bolt also honors Altronic’s original logo.

Altronic works in ignition, instrumentation and control systems for natural gas engines, compressors and generators. It was founded

in 1953.

AMERICA MAKES NAMES NEW COMMITTEE MEMBERS: With America Makes entering its 10th year, the executive committee will help lead the transition into the next phase of the America Makes program. Serving as the core strategic advisory committee, they will ensure that the appropriate strategy, policy and advocacy are in place for America Makes to achieve its mission.

The 2022-23 executive committee is Rachel Andrulonis, director, advanced materials research, National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State University; Edward D. Herderick, director, additive manufacturing at The Ohio State University Center for Design and Manufacturing Excellence; Stephanie Gaffney, director, advanced manufacturing programs, Youngstown Business Incubator; Brian Meincke, vice president, global business development and innovation strategy, ASTM International; Melanie Lang, CEO, FormAlloy; Nicholas Mule, director, additive manufacturing, Boeing; Brian Rosenberger, senior technical fellow, Lockheed Martin; and Zach Simkin, president, Senvol.

Government representatives are Shawn Moylan, mechanical engineer and project leader, National Institute of Standards and Technology; Beth Ripley, deputy chief, Office of Healthcare Innovation and Learning at U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; and Rick Russell, NESC technical fellow for materials, NASA.

New businesses

RIBBON CUTTING SET: QUICKmed Urgent Care will host a ribbon-cutting ceremony noon Wednesday for its new location at 402 S. Chestnut St., Ravenna. Last week, the locally owned medical clinic opened its doors to provide Ravenna residents with its nonlife-threatening health services.

Free physicals for school-aged children are available until Oct. 31.

QUICKmed was founded in 2018, with its first location in Liberty. Ravenna is its ninth location.

MERIDIAN OPENS NEW OFFICE: Meridian HealthCare is opening a new chiropractic office in Poland at 2894 Center Road.

The location, formerly Dr. Christopher Clautti’s practice known as Back to Health Chiropractic and Massage Therapy,will provide chiropractic and acupuncture services. Clautti will stay on at the office.

Chiropractic treatment and acupuncture services can be used to manage chronic pain, increase mobility / range of motion and improve overall wellness.

Meridian also has chiropractic offices in Howland and two in Youngstown.

NEW RESTAURANT OPENS AT EWM: A new addition to the culinary lineup at the Eastwood Mall Complex, King Cajun Seafood & Bar, celebrated its opening Tuesday with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

The restaurant is situated in a standalone location on the east side of the mall complex, next to Steak ‘n Shake. The nearly 10,000-square-foot building was previously home to another restaurant.

The space was completely renovated, creating new dining rooms and a full bar. Dishes inspired by the cuisine of Louisiana and the Low Country are prominent on the menu.

People on the move

717 PROMOTES: Keri Davis has been named assistant consumer lending manager and has been with 717 for six years. In her new position, Davis will work with the consumer lending manager to direct the daily operations of the lending production staff.

FACTOR JOINS POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENT: Potential Development has brought on Lori A. Factor to the newly created position of director of communications.

Factor brings 30 years of communications, public relations and marketing experience to the organization. She most recently was director of community engagement and events for Youngstown State University’s Cliffe College and director of the YSU Summer Festival of the Arts.

She is a Youngstown native and a 1985 graduate of YSU with a degree in advertising and public relations, and has held positions at Farmers National Bank, the former Youngstown Area Chamber of Commerce and the YSU Alumni Association.

iSYNERGY PROMOTES FROM WITHIN: Digital marketing agency iSynergy has promoted Jessica Ashcroft to vice president of content. With the addition of the role, Ashcroft will work to expand the department while continuing to help clients gain a better understanding of the digital marketing landscape.

She has a bachelor’s degree in business administration and has worked in the industry for nearly seven years. She has been with iSynergy for more than three years. Previously, Ashcroft was a marketing coordinator in Pittsburgh, where she facilitated presentations, designed marketing materials, generated reports and researched prospect lists for sales.

WEARSCH JOINS FARMERS TRUST: Farmers Trust Company has expanded its team with the addition of attorney Meredith A. Wearsch as assistant vice president, trust administration for the company’s operations in Boardman.

Wearsch brings with her experience focused on estate planning, estate and gift tax planning, and entity formation and income tax planning. Before joining Farmers, she practiced law in Los Angeles, and is a licensed attorney in California and Florida.

COLEMAN HEALTH ADDS VP: Nicole Martin, a behavioral health clinician in northeast Ohio, has joined Coleman Health Services as its vice president of clinical strategy and innovation. She began work Sept. 6.

Martin of Aurora, most recently served as executive director of Silver Maple Recovery in Lorain. Before becoming executive director, Martin was the director of external relations.

Her experience includes facilitating all of the activities to acquire state licensure, Medicaid enrollment and Joint Commission accreditation.

Submit items for business briefs, new businesses and people on the move to [email protected], fax to 330-841-1717 or online at www.tribtoday.com. The deadline is 4 p.m. Thursday. Business Briefs, People on the move and New businesses generally run Mondays in The Vindicator.

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Media told to leave property as Meadows management refuses to respond to residents, local leaders

Copy This Embed Code: Ad On Tuesday, members of the media, residents and local leaders met outside the front gates of The Meadows neighborhood in Tallahassee after management failed to respond to multiple communication attempts by city leaders and residents.TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) — On Tuesday, members of the media, residents and local leaders met outside the front gates of The Meadows neighborhood in Tallahassee after management failed to respond to multiple communication attempts by city leaders and residents....

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On Tuesday, members of the media, residents and local leaders met outside the front gates of The Meadows neighborhood in Tallahassee after management failed to respond to multiple communication attempts by city leaders and residents.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) — On Tuesday, members of the media, residents and local leaders met outside the front gates of The Meadows neighborhood in Tallahassee after management failed to respond to multiple communication attempts by city leaders and residents.

After a short gathering, members of the media were told to leave the front of the property and move to the sidewalk and closer to the street. Residents told security that the members of the media were invited by them and were their guests.

The media and local leaders then moved to the sidewalk as requested. City Commissioner Jeremy Matlow grabbed a microphone after they had moved and began to address the gathering about how management knew they were there.

"They refuse to answer phone calls from elected officials or make any type of meaningful effort to communicate with these residents," Matlow said. "They know we're out here, right now. The message that they're sending is to 'Get in the roadway because we do not care.'"

In September, the Meadows Mobile Home Park was taken over by Florida Sun Estates, who raised lot rents from $389 to $895 monthly.

A spokesperson with Florida Sun Estates said they're raising prices to make improvements to the park. But, they're no longer letting people rent mobile homes, they'll only be available for purchase. That means anyone with an existing lease can finish it out but will have to vacate when it ends unless they choose to buy the home.

According to a news release from Tallahassee City Commissioner Jack Porter, one resident said she and her husband were promised something would be in writing this week. But, each time they go into the office to get a written agreement, no one is in the office. The couple added that their lease ends on Jan. 31.

State Representative Alison Tant said in a release that she has, "called, written letters, and have spoken with a very dismissive staff person." The District 9 representative said that she is working with other local leaders and organizations to address the concerns of residents and the safety of the children who live there.

Several residents say their cries for help on where to go next are being ignored by the new owners.

So, the community is doing what it can to provide legal, financial, and moral support so they're not alone.

"I'm not going anywhere because myself and a couple other elderly ladies, you're going put us out in the pandemic," exclaimed Meadow's resident, Glenora Gardner, at Tuesday's rally.

Residents of the Meadows Mobile Home Park say the new owners of what is now Florida Sun Estates are ignoring their pleas for more information regarding their leases. Back in September, not only did rent more than double, tenants are no longer allowed to re-sign new leases.

"You just can't come in and force people to move out of their homes."

They can only buy trailers in addition to paying the newly increased lot rent. That means any existing leases will not be renewed leaving residents with few options like Rukeiya Heywood.

"September to now when my lease is about to be up at the end of the month that's not enough time."

Residents and community leaders are looking for accountability from the new owners as lease terminations might mean evictions.

At Tuesday's rally, park security asked all media to vacate the property, causing more anguish among the community.

"I'm going to need you all to vacate the property this is actually private property."

The group is trying to send a new message to the property's new owners. They're asking for help.

Tallahassee City Commissioner Jack Porter said, "we cannot reach the management company to resolve these folks' cases and get assistance."

Leon County Schools promises families who are forced to move will be allowed to keep their kids at Sabal Palm Elementary. The gate that connects the Meadows and the school? Still closed.

"The children no longer have safe access to the school, we have invited the management and owner to get involved to make a positive impact," said Krista Campbell, the Community Leadership Chair of the Community Partnership School at Sabal Palm Elementary School.

Commissioner Jack Porter is working with other community leaders to put together a fundraiser for the Meadows' residents. Those details will be unveiled once they set everything up.

Last Tuesday, ABC 27 told you lawyers with Legal Services of North Florida worked to negotiate a smaller rent hike but that is only for people who already own their homes, not for renters.

Florida Legislators are working on bills to limit how much landlords can raise rents going forward statewide.

Local scores for Aurora, Elgin, Naperville and Lake County

Email Beacon-News, Courier-News and Naperville Sun results to [email protected] and News-Sun results to [email protected]: Schedules are subject to change because of weather and other factors.FOOTBALLHIGH SCHOOLSWEEK 3FRIDAY’S GAMESBIG NORTHERN...

Email Beacon-News, Courier-News and Naperville Sun results to [email protected] and News-Sun results to [email protected].

Note: Schedules are subject to change because of weather and other factors.

FOOTBALL

HIGH SCHOOLS

WEEK 3

FRIDAY’S GAMES

BIG NORTHERN

North Boone at Genoa-Kingston, 7 p.m.

DUKANE

Batavia at Wheaton North, 7 p.m.

Glenbard North at Geneva, 7 p.m.

Lake Park at St. Charles East, 7 p.m.

Wheaton Warrenville South at St. Charles North, 7 p.m.

FOX VALLEY

Burlington Central at Dundee-Crown, 7 p.m.

Hampshire at Crystal Lake South, 7 p.m.

Jacobs at McHenry, 7 p.m.

KISHWAUKEE RIVER/INTERSTATE EIGHT WHITE

Kaneland at Morris, 7 p.m.

METRO SUBURBAN BLUE

Aurora Central Catholic at Wheaton Academy, 7:30 p.m.

METRO SUBURBAN RED

St. Edward at St. Francis, 7 p.m.

NORTH SUBURBAN

Stevenson at Lake Zurich, 7 p.m.

Warren at Libertyville, 7 p.m.

Waukegan at Lake Forest, 7 p.m.

Zion-Benton at Mundelein, 7 p.m.

NORTHERN LAKE COUNTY

Grayslake North at Grant, 7:15 p.m.

Lakes at Antioch, 7 p.m.

North Chicago at Grayslake Central, 7 p.m.

Round Lake at Wauconda, 7 p.m.

UPSTATE EIGHT

East Aurora at Bartlett, 7:30 p.m.

Larkin at Glenbard South, 7 p.m.

South Elgin at Fenton, 7 p.m.

Streamwood at Elgin, 7:30 p.m.

NONCONFERENCE

Belleville East at Metea Valley, 7 p.m.

Brother Rice vs. Benet at College of DuPage, 7:30 p.m.

Christ the King at Aurora Christian, 7:30 p.m.

Deerfield at Hersey, 7 p.m.

Highland Park at Buffalo Grove, 7 p.m.

Montini at Marmion, 7:30 p.m.

O’Fallon at Waubonsie Valley, 6 p.m.

Riverside University/Meir (Wis.) at Naperville Central, 7 p.m.

St. Mary’s (Mo.) at Neuqua Valley, 7 p.m.

Vernon Hills at Rolling Meadows, 7 p.m.

West Aurora at Plainfield Central, 7 p.m.

Westmont at Plano, 7:15 p.m.

SATURDAY’S GAMES

NONCONFERENCE

Carmel vs. Leo at St. Rita, 7 p.m.

St. Mary’s Prep (Mich.) at Naperville North, 1 p.m.

LOCAL COLLEGES

NONCONFERENCE

Franklin (Ind.) at Aurora, 1 p.m.

North Central College at Wabash (Ind.), noon.

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS

HIGH SCHOOLS

BOYS SOCCER

Benet 10, Joliet Catholic 2

Benet: Drew Feldman 3 goals. Ryan Augustyn, Colin McGuinn 2 goals.

DePue 6, Hinckley-Big Rock 3

Elgin 2, East Aurora 0

Grant 2, Johnsburg 1

Kaneland 6, Ottawa 2

Kaneland: Mikkel Oleson 4 goals, assist. Anthony Buchanan 4 assists.

Larkin 2, Streamwood 1

St. Patrick 4, Carmel 2

South Elgin 2, Glenbard East 2

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Lake Zurich d. Stevenson 23-25, 26-24, 26-24

Lake Zurich (8-4, 1-0 North Suburban): Akpevwe Akpoigbe 12 kills. Chelsea Williams 11 kills. Heidi Mason 35 assists, 6 digs.

Stevenson (8-5, 0-1): Brynn Smith 12 kills, 4 digs. Mija Jegers 9 kills, 7 digs. Abby Minin 25 assists.

Libertyville d. Warren 25-20, 25-21

Libertyville (7-3, 1-0 North Suburban): Keira Kasten 6 kills, 7 digs. Ashley Branford 5 kills, 4 blocks. Hannah Fleming 5 kills. Jaimie Marquardt 15 assists, 4 kills, 5 digs, 4 blocks, 5 aces.

Naperville North d. Wheaton Warrenville South 25-22, 25-22

Oswego East d. Bolingbrook 25-17, 25-23

St. Charles East d. Benet 25-15, 23-25, 25-18

Vernon Hills d. Lakes 25-19, 25-10

Vernon Hills (8-2-2): Alexa Cieslinski 11 kills. Maya Raval 15 assists. Ellen Amjadi 12 digs.

West Aurora d. West Chicago 25-23, 25-13

TUESDAY’S RESULTS

HIGH SCHOOLS

BOYS SOCCER

Deerfield 3, Glenbrook South 1

Deerfield (3-3): Ryder Coleman 2 goals. Max Izaks goal. Jason Nieder 2 assists.

DeKalb 2, Metea Valley 0

Geneva 1, Glenbard North 1

Geneva: Trent Giansanti goal.

Genoa-Kingston 7, Dixon 0

Genoa-Kingston (7-1, 3-0 Big Northern): Junior Leon 3 goals.

Grayslake Central 2, Warren 0

Huntley 1 Libertyville 0

IMSA 3, Ottawa 2

Joliet West 3, Oswego East 2

Lake Forest 10, Antioch 0

Marmion 3, Wheaton Academy 3

Mundelein 4, Dundee-Crown 2

Dundee-Crown (4-4-1): Miguel Pena, Sebastian Sanchez goal.

Naperville Central 5, Waubonsie Valley 0

Naperville Central (5-2, 1-0 DuPage Valley): Joey LoDuca, Nathan Kwon, Elliott Krause goal.

Naperville North 5, Neuqua Valley 0

Naperville North (6-2, 1-0 DuPage Valley): Noah Radeke 2 goals. Connor Hanrahan, Alex Barger, Josh Pedersen goal.

North Chicago 3, Westlake Christian 1

Oswego 2, Yorkville 1

Plano 9, Sandwich 1

Plano (6-3-1, 1-2 Interstate Eight): Christ Keleba 4 goals.

St. Charles East 4, Lake Park 1

St. Charles East (6-0-1, 1-0 DuKane): Colin Leatherbury 2 goals. Marc Walker, Aiden Maloney goal.

St. Charles North 4, Wheaton Warrenville South 0

St. Francis 1, St. Edward 0

Stevenson 3, Carmel 2

West Aurora 3, Plainfield Central 1

West Aurora (6-3-1, 1-0 Southwest Prairie West): Omari Rashidi, Blake Studdard, Ayub Rashidi goal.

West Chicago 3, Bartlett 0

Wheaton North 4, Batavia 1

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Bartlett d. West Chicago 23-25, 25-19, 25-20

Benet d. Nazareth 25-18, 25-20

Burlington Central d. Crystal Lake South 25-13, 25-23

Carmel d. St. Viator 25-19, 12-25, 25-19

Carmel (5-8, 1-0 ESCC): Bella Lucero 13 kills, 4 aces. Claire Parker 18 assists. Alyssa Kamins 14 digs.

Chicago Christian d. Aurora Central Catholic 16-25, 25-15, 25-15

Dundee-Crown d. Crystal Lake Central 25-23, 25-22

Hinckley-Big Rock d. Alden-Hebron 25-14, 25-18

Hinckley-Big Rock (5-5): Brynn Gawel 9 kills. Courtlyn Brockway 5 kills, 5 aces.

Huntley d. Jacobs 25-16, 25-11

Jacobs (3-7, 1-4 Fox Valley): Aurora Rodella 5 assists. Bella Van de Burgt 13 digs.

Kaneland d. LaSalle-Peru 25-17, 25-12

Lake Park d. St. Charles East 25-19, 25-20

Montini d. Genoa-Kingston 25-19, 25-21

Newark d. Seneca 25-23, 25-14

Newark (10-0, 2-0 Little Ten): Lauren Ulrich 7 assists, 5 kills. Grace Thrall 4 kills, 3 blocks. Taylor Kruser 15 digs.

Oswego d. Waubonsie Valley 25-15, 17-25, 25-21

Waubonsie (4-4): Naomi Dowd 19 kills. Gabb Tlustochowski 7 kills. Asia Mitchell 10 digs.

Ottawa d. Sandwich 25-21, 25-19

Sandwich (3-6, 0-1 Interstate Eight): Claire Allen 8 kills. Kaylin Herren 4 kills. Alexis Sexton 8 assists. Alana Stahl 7 digs.

Ottawa Marquette d. Somonauk 25-13, 25-17

Somonauk (3-4): Josie Rader 3 kills, 3 aces. Riley Snider 5 assists. Ali McBride 10 digs. Amelia Grace 6 digs, 2 aces.

St. Charles North d. Wheaton Warrenville South 14-25, 25-22, 25-22

Wheaton North d. Batavia 25-22, 25-19

Batavia (7-7, 0-1 DuKane): Amanda Otten 10 kills, 5 blocks. Teagan Rokos 6 digs, 2 aces.

Compiled by Josh Krockey.

Tenants say new mobile home park owners doubled lot rent, many now leaving homes behind

The new year brings with it a new reality for many residents at Florida Sun Estates, the mobile home community off Roberts Avenue formerly known as The Meadows.TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) - The new year brings with it a new reality for many residents at Florida Sun Estates, the mobile home community off Roberts Avenue formerly known as The Meadows.According to tenants there, new management arrived over the summer, and with it life-altering rent hikes.Joyce McMillian lived in the community for thirty years. She says the firs...

The new year brings with it a new reality for many residents at Florida Sun Estates, the mobile home community off Roberts Avenue formerly known as The Meadows.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) - The new year brings with it a new reality for many residents at Florida Sun Estates, the mobile home community off Roberts Avenue formerly known as The Meadows.

According to tenants there, new management arrived over the summer, and with it life-altering rent hikes.

Joyce McMillian lived in the community for thirty years. She says the first sign something would change was when renters were told to purchase the home they lived in or move out.

Soon after, she says homeowners like herself received a rent hike for the land their homes sit on.

“From $339 a month to $889 a month, and we couldn’t afford to pay that,” she said.

McMillian said she is a veteran, and her husband worked for decades as a roofer.

“We worked all of our lives until we couldn’t work any more,” she said.

She said after they purchased their home for $40,000, McMillian and her husband assumed they’d live out their lives there.

“We purchased the home brand new and thought that was it. We didn’t have any inkling of uprooting,” she said.

But then, McMillian says, came last Fall’s notice. She said they tried to fight but couldn’t get anywhere, and moving the home physically off the land was also extremely expensive.

Eventually, they gave up, selling the home for under $10,000. The couple is now staying at a hotel in Lakeland, not too far from a grandson in Tampa. They’re now looking for an apartment in the area.

City Commissioner Jack Porter said her office was alerted to the issue from concerned constituents.

“Families who have been there for years, who have nowhere to go- it’s awful,” she said.

Porter is part of a team organizing an urgent legal clinic Tuesday at 6 p.m. at nearby Sabal Palm Elementary School.

“With an existing affordable housing shortage locally, the question is where are these folks going to go if not here? We don’t have the housing for them,” she said.

Porter said the clinic will help renters understand their rights and their options.

State records show Florida Sun Estates, LLC., is owned by Derek Vickers. According to his LinkedIn page, Vickers owns an Orlando-based real estate group.

WCTV reached out to the front office of the community requesting comment, but has not heard back. This story will be updated with a comment if provided.

Copyright 2022 WCTV. All rights reserved.

Donation fund set up for Florida Sun Estates residents

Copy This Embed Code: Ad TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) — Tina Ratel and her family of five currently live at Florida Sun Estates, formerly The Meadows. Ratel herself has lived their since March of 2008. She said in April they'll have to move when their lease is up."I don't know. The boxes are all packed, and my eight-year-old says where are we going to move," said Ratel. "I don't have an answer for her, because I don't have an answer for me."When Florida Sun Estates bought the mobile home park...

Copy This Embed Code:

Ad

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) — Tina Ratel and her family of five currently live at Florida Sun Estates, formerly The Meadows. Ratel herself has lived their since March of 2008. She said in April they'll have to move when their lease is up.

"I don't know. The boxes are all packed, and my eight-year-old says where are we going to move," said Ratel. "I don't have an answer for her, because I don't have an answer for me."

When Florida Sun Estates bought the mobile home park, lot rent was raised from $389 a month to $895 a month. Now the only option available to stay in the park is to buy the homes they're living in.

With a son recently diagnosed with Type I Diabetes, a husband who recently lost a job and had to find new work, and a family still dealing with COVID-19, Ratel said they can't afford to move anywhere else.

"We are struggling to pay what we pay now and there is nothing affordable for us out there," said Ratel.

There are others like Ratel in need of help, with community leaders vowing to do what they can.

Last Tuesday, Commissioners Jack Porter and Jeremy Matlow stood with residents at Florida Sun Estates urging property management to return their calls to try and work with them to keep families in their homes.

"The issue that we're running into now is that we've been able to get legal representation for a lot of the residents of The Meadows, now Florida Sun Estates, but we are not hearing back from the property management in order to resolve their cases," said Porter.

Porter said they're now focused on providing financial assistance to the 20 people who will need to move when their leases are up. A donation page for the community has been setup at Tallahassee help dot com with more than 11 thousand dollar raised so far.

"Tallahassee is a generous community, I think we're a loving community, and we step up when there are those in need and that's why it is that much more disappointing to see this happening here locally, and that's why the message needs to be received loud and clear that we are not a community where this is going to be tolerated," said Porter.

If you would like to help the Florida Sun Estates residents, click here.

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Tigers sending 8 prospects to Arizona Fall League, including Colt Keith and Parker Meadows

The Detroit Tigers are sending eight prospects to the Arizona Fall League, including one pitcher — 24-year-old left-hander Joey Wentz — who is finishing the regular season in the major leagues.The eight will compete for the Salt River Rafters: ...

The Detroit Tigers are sending eight prospects to the Arizona Fall League, including one pitcher — 24-year-old left-hander Joey Wentz — who is finishing the regular season in the major leagues.

The eight will compete for the Salt River Rafters: Wentz, right-hander Jack Anderson, left-hander Andrew Magno, right-hander Tyler Mattison, catcher Dillon Dingler, infielder Colt Keith, infielder Gage Workman and outfielder Parker Meadows.

"It's just the process of innings," said Wentz, who has thrown 70? innings this season in the minors and majors combined. "I understand the innings. I'm building for next year. Hopefully, I finish up the year here doing well and go down there and do well and roll it into next year."

The AFL season begins Oct. 3 and concludes with the AFL Championship Game on Nov. 12. The Fall Stars Game, which highlights the best players, is Nov. 6.

The AFL will enforce several rule changes for the 2023 MLB season (though they've been in effect throughout the minors in 2022), including a pitch clock. Pitchers get 15 seconds with the bases empty and 20 seconds with runners on. Two other already-approved rule changes — larger bases and a ban on the shift for defensive positioniing — will be enforced in the AFL, too.

In late May, Wentz suffered a left shoulder injury in the second MLB start of his career. He has a 1.69 ERA with two walks and 10 strikeouts over 10? innings in two starts since returning to the Tigers in September.

"It's been in the works since the time that he got injured," manager A.J. Hinch said. "We knew his season was going to be shortened. We didn't know how many innings he was going to be able to get toward the tail end of the season, with or without the big leagues. These starts that he's getting are important at this level. They're also important for his conditioning heading into next season. The Fall League will factor into that as well."

Keith is the Tigers' No. 6 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline, and arguably the best hitting prospect in the farm system. The 21-year-old third baseman, who was drafted out of high school in the fifth round in 2020, suffered a right shoulder injury June 9 and hasn't played since. He is back to full health and will start the AFL season on time. Before the injury, he hit .301 with nine home runs, 22 walks and 42 strikeouts in 48 games.

Dingler, the Tigers' No. 10 prospect and a 2020 second-round selection, hasn't played since Sept. 4 because of shoulder soreness and won't return to action for Double-A Erie this season, though he will be ready for the start of the AFL schedule. The 23-year-old batted .238 with 14 home runs, 45 walks and 143 strikeouts in 107 games with the SeaWolves.

Also in Erie, Meadows — the No. 17 prospect and the Tigers' second-round pick in 2018 — is one of the most improved players in the farm system. After 14 games with High-A West Michigan, the Tigers promoted Meadows, the younger brother of Austin Meadows, to the Double-A level. Spanning 110 games, the 22-year-old has a .280 batting average with 16 homers, 50 walks and 84 strikeouts.

Workman spent 2022 with Erie, too, but has an extreme strikeout problem. The 22-year-old struck out 202 times (with 34 walks) over 503 plate appearances in 125 games this season alone. He also has 14 homers and 30 stolen bases. In 2021, Workman was punched out 157 times in 118 games but had 12 homers and 31 steals.

Of the four pitchers, only Wentz (No. 25) and Mattison (No. 26) rank among the Tigers' top 30 prospects by MLB Pipeline.

The Tigers drafted Mattison, 23, in the fourth round in 2021 out of Bryant University and sent him to the bullpen. He posted a 5.23 ERA with 17 walks and 46 strikeouts over 32? innings in 24 relief appearances for Low-A Lakeland, after three outings (and seven innings) in the Florida Complex League.

Anderson, 22, pitched as a reliever for Lakeland (21 games) and West Michigan (18 games) this season, with a combined 3.47 ERA, 14 walks and 72 strikeouts in 59? innings. The Tigers drafted him in the 16th round in 2021.

Magno has pitched at three levels this season: West Michigan (47 games), Erie (three games) and Triple-A Toledo (one game). For the Whitecaps, the 24-year-old logged a 2.37 ERA, 31 walks and 62 strikeouts over 49? innings. He also notched 12 saves.

Miggy 'feeling really good'

Designated hitter Miguel Cabrera (left biceps strain) took batting practice on the field Friday afternoon and will do the same before Saturday's game. The 39-year-old took 40-50 swings in the batting cage Wednesday and reported "feeling really good," Hinch said.

Before returning, Cabrera will need to hit off the velocity machine.

He has been sidelined since leaving a Sept. 2 game with his injury.

Brieske finishes bullpen

Right-hander Beau Brieske (right forearm soreness) completed an up-down bullpen, simulating two innings, on Thursday. He came out of the bullpen session healthy. The Tigers will soon determine the next three weeks of Brieske's schedule.

The 24-year-old could make a rehab assignment start in Triple-A Toledo, or the Tigers could end his rehab and begin his offseason program. Brieske, who has thrown 99 innings (81? in MLB), wants to return to the majors this season.

"There's some real conversation going on about what the best route is for him," Hinch said.

Slime time: Septic tanks suspected as origin of Stuart algae bloom

For the generations who grew up seeing green slime dumped on people to great comedic effect, it’s a kind of melancholy nostalgia to now see slime coating the water and killing vital marine plant life. Call it, “You Can’t Do That On Waterways,” but it’s happening on the Sailfish Flats near Stuart, threatening seagrass meadows Floridians took so much time and money to save.“In the past, the long past, a lo...

For the generations who grew up seeing green slime dumped on people to great comedic effect, it’s a kind of melancholy nostalgia to now see slime coating the water and killing vital marine plant life. Call it, “You Can’t Do That On Waterways,” but it’s happening on the Sailfish Flats near Stuart, threatening seagrass meadows Floridians took so much time and money to save.

“In the past, the long past, a lot of times folks were somewhat reasonably pointing fingers that some of the problem was Lake Okeechobee discharges,” said Brandon Shuler, Executive Director of the American Water Security Project. “Other folks were pointing fingers that it is sewage issues and septic tank issues. It’s definitely got cyanobacteria and algae bloom issues going on over there, but … Lake O has not had a discharge and there have been very few basin runoffs from rain events, because we’re in extreme drought, for the last three and a half years.

“So, that takes one of the biggest voices that was blaming everything on Lake Okeechobee discharges being the issue and really kind of points back to, there are other issues here that need to be explained more deeply.”

With Lake Okeechobee excused from the lineup of usual suspects, that leaves two likely culprits — either septic tanks or legacy pollution.

It comes at the same time Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch, a Board member for the South Florida Water Management District, posted aerial photos celebrating the return of seagrass to the area.

“Today’s photos highlight the area’s returning seagrass meadows after their disappearance primarily because of years of damaging cyanobacteria laden Lake Okeechobee discharges, especially in 2013, 2016, & 2018,” she wrote in late August.

As a result, the appearance of this toxic algae bloom — coating the water and wrapping around angler’s fishing lines — lends a sense of urgency to the need for action so as not to lose the rewards of all the work that went into restoring the seagrass so far.

One issue is an elevated level of nitrogen and phosphorus in the local basin waters compared to water that comes in from Lake Okeechobee.

“It’s really easy on the St. Lucie River to fall into the trap of thinking that all of our problems come from Lake Okeechobee, and if we could just stop the discharges, then we would have a healthy, pristine estuary,” said Nyla Pipes of the One Florida Foundation.

Whenever there is a time of less rain or drought, she said, and the water looks as it did in the photos posted by Thurlow-Lippisch, people feel ready to call it mission accomplished when it’s not necessarily the case.

“You have tons of septic tanks — Florida is, I think, No. 3 in the nation for the number of septic tanks that still service homes,” Shuler said. “Just knowing how septic tanks work, it’s designed to fail.”

Liquid wastewater exits the septic tank and goes into what’s called a drainfield, into which the wastewater filters through the soil before discharging into the groundwater.

“We know that we have to work on septic-to-sewer conversion,” Pipes said.

“The argument people say is, ‘When we don’t have releases, we don’t have any algae.’ I would say that this situation with that filamentous algae that’s covering the seagrass right now, shows that to be untrue. We just have a different kind.”

Another of the next steps, Shuler said, is to work with municipalities to do third-level wastewater treatment, taking nitrogen and phosphorus out of the sewage and returning nutrient-lowered water to the wider world without it having such a detrimental impact on local waterways.

“The other part of that step that goes hand-in-hand is taking an inventory of septic tanks and really getting serious about upgrading our wastewater facilities to third-level treatment that takes most of the nutrient waste out,” he said, “and centralizing septic tanks and getting them connected back up to a centralized sewage treatment plant that actually is treated to levels that are outlined in (federal and state law).”

Best of Central Florida: Back to school businesses to keep your kids busy

The advertiser paid a fee to promote this sponsored article and may have influenced or authored the content. The views expressed in this article are those of the advertiser and do not necessarily reflect those of this site or affiliated companies.It’s that time of year again: the kids are back in school and parents are elated.While being in school certainly keeps them busy all day long, what about what they do after school? If you want your child’s day full of activities and learning, checking out some of these afte...

The advertiser paid a fee to promote this sponsored article and may have influenced or authored the content. The views expressed in this article are those of the advertiser and do not necessarily reflect those of this site or affiliated companies.

It’s that time of year again: the kids are back in school and parents are elated.

While being in school certainly keeps them busy all day long, what about what they do after school? If you want your child’s day full of activities and learning, checking out some of these after school businesses may be a good idea.

Makaila’s Choice: Jukido Academy

As host Makaila Nichols points out, there is a stigma around learning martial arts that it might make a person more violent, but owner and head instructor of Jukido Academy, George Rego, explained that it’s a confidence builder when kids learn martial arts. Kids can take classes after school and learn martial arts at their own pace.

People’s Choice: Meadows Academy

Trying to figure out childcare for your kids while you are at work all day can be a challenging thing. You want them to learn as much as they can, but you also want them to be safe and taken care of. That’s why the People’s Choice is Meadows Academy. Not only do they have childcare from infant to 4-years old, they also have before and after school programs for elementary-aged kids

People’s Choice: Huntington Learning Center

Finding your child a helpful tutor for school can be a struggle. You want someone that is going to help improve your child’s skills in education as well as a nice and friendly person. Huntington Learning Center is another People’s Choice because they are so beloved by folks who send their kids there. The Best of Central Florida hosts even interviewed a child and mother who use Huntington Learning Center, and they could not say enough goo things about it.

Justin’s Choice: Altitude Trampoline Park

You know that when it is Justin’s turn for a pick it’s going to be a fun one. What better thing to do after school with your kids than hangout at a trampoline park? Kids of all ages love this place, and it’s a great way to burn up the last of that energy they have before you’ve got to take them home and get them ready for bed. With multiple locations in Central Florida, this is a fun place to take your kids.

Researchers Had Created a New Methods on Protecting Mangrove Species in Mexico

Researchers have discovered a new incentive to safeguard mangrove forests: for the past 5,000 years, they have been silently removing carbon from the Earth's atmosphere.Mangroves flourish in circumstances that most plants cannot, such as salty coastal seas.When the tides are high, certain species have air-conducting, vertical roots that behave like snorkels, creating the impression of trees floating on stilts.A study team led by UC Riverside and UC San Diego set out to discover how maritime mangroves off the coast of La ...

Researchers have discovered a new incentive to safeguard mangrove forests: for the past 5,000 years, they have been silently removing carbon from the Earth's atmosphere.

Mangroves flourish in circumstances that most plants cannot, such as salty coastal seas.

When the tides are high, certain species have air-conducting, vertical roots that behave like snorkels, creating the impression of trees floating on stilts.

A study team led by UC Riverside and UC San Diego set out to discover how maritime mangroves off the coast of La Paz, Mexico, collected and released components, such as nitrogen and carbon, a process known as biogeochemical cycling.

Mexican mangroves have been capturing carbon for 5,000 years

Because these processes are mostly controlled by microorganisms, the team was particularly interested in learning which bacteria and fungi thrive there, as per ScienceDaily.

The scientists anticipated finding carbon in a layer of peat beneath the forest, but they did not expect it to be 5,000 years old.

This finding, as well as a description of the bacteria discovered, has been published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series.

What makes these mangrove locations unique is that they have held the carbon for so long, according to Emma Aronson, a UCR environmental microbiologist and senior co-author of the study.

It has orders of magnitude greater carbon storage than the majority of the region's other ecosystems.

The peat beneath the mangrove plants is made up of submerged silt and partially degraded organic materials and is stretched approximately 10 feet below the coastal sea line in certain sites examined for this study.

Little oxygen reaches the lowest peat layer, which is likely why the scientists detected no fungus alive in there; fungi are generally present in practically every ecosystem on Earth.

However, most fungi that specialize in the breakdown of carbon compounds require oxygen.

In future mangrove peat research, scientists may look into the lack of fungus further.

More than 1,100 different species of bacteria live beneath the mangroves, consuming and excreting a wide range of chemical components.

The fewer microorganisms you find in peat soils, the deeper you go.

Not much can break the carbon down there, or the peat itself, for that matter," said Mia Maltz, a UCR microbial ecologist, and research author. "Because it lasts so long, it's difficult to manufacture more of it or replicate the communities of microorganisms that live inside it."

Other ecosystems on Earth are known to have similarly aged or even older carbon, such as Arctic or Antarctic permafrost, where the ice hasn't yet thawed, allowing gas release, and potentially other mangrove forests.

The researchers are now scouting mangrove research sites in Hawaii, Florida, and Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.

These locations are preserving carbon that has been there for millennia.

Disturbing them would result in carbon emissions that we would be unable to fix anytime soon, according to Matthew Costa, a UC San Diego marine ecologist and the paper's first author.

Carbon dioxide contributes to the greenhouse effect, which causes the globe to warm.

Costa argued that leaving mangroves alone is one approach to prevent this problem from escalating.

Also Read: Mangrove Park in Abu Dhabi Thrives in Extremely Salty Waters, Summer Temperatures

Why Mangroves Matter

Mangrove forests were traditionally thought to be marshy wastelands.

Planners, biologists, and coastal residents have all come to recognize them as the incredibly diverse and essential ecosystems that they are, as per the American Museum of Natural History

Mangroves, seagrass beds, and coral reefs all work together to maintain coastal zones healthy.

Thousands of species rely on mangroves for survival.

They also help to maintain shorelines, reducing erosion and preserving the land - and the people who live on it - from storms and waves.

Mangroves, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are frequently found together and collaborate. The trees collect sediment and pollutants that would otherwise be washed into the sea.

Seagrass beds act as an additional barrier to silt and sludge that may suffocate the reefs.

Mangroves provide perfect breeding sites for a large proportion of the world's fish, shrimp, crabs, and other shellfish.

Many fish species, including barracuda, tarpon, and snook, seek refuge among the mangrove roots as youngsters, then migrate out to graze in the seagrass meadows as adults.

An estimated 75% of commercially harvested fish spend time in mangroves or rely on food webs traceable back to these coastal forests.

From bacteria to barnacles to Bengal tigers, mangrove forests provide a home for hundreds of species at all levels of the marine and forest food webs.

The trees provide habitat for bug species, enticing birds that seek refuge in the dense branches.

Hundreds of shorebird and migratory bird species, including kingfishers, herons, and egrets, use these coastal woodlands as breeding and resting grounds.

Crab-eating macaques, fisher cats, and gigantic monitor lizards prowl in the mangroves, as do endangered species like olive Ridley turtles, white-breasted sea eagles, tree climbing fish, proboscis monkeys, and dugongs.

And the soft soil beneath mangrove roots allows burrowing animals like snails and clams to hide. Other species feed in the fertile mud, such as crabs and shrimp.

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