TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Vienna, NJ

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 HRT For Men Vienna, NJ

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

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How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

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What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

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Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

 TRT Vienna, NJ

Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

 Hormone Replacement  Vienna, NJ

Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT Vienna, NJ, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Vienna, NJ

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in Vienna, NJ, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men Vienna, NJ

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men Vienna, NJ

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

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Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

 Ipamorelin Vienna, NJ

Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

 Sermorelin Vienna, NJ

Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

 TRT Vienna, NJ

Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men Vienna, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT For Men Vienna, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Human Growth Hormone Vienna, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

 Ipamorelin Vienna, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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The least diverse cities and most common statues in America. And more!

In its purest form, data describes the world around us. It doesn’t extrapolate or infer. It doesn’t show cause and effect. It’s a simple tool for converting reality into fun facts.The cool kids — and by that I mean academics and policymakers — sometimes roll their eyes at data that is merely descriptive. Not us! We here at the Department of Data love these meat-and-potatoes data sets.But we can’t blast out a news alert about the most valuable interstate highways or the least diverse cities. S...

In its purest form, data describes the world around us. It doesn’t extrapolate or infer. It doesn’t show cause and effect. It’s a simple tool for converting reality into fun facts.

The cool kids — and by that I mean academics and policymakers — sometimes roll their eyes at data that is merely descriptive. Not us! We here at the Department of Data love these meat-and-potatoes data sets.

But we can’t blast out a news alert about the most valuable interstate highways or the least diverse cities. So we’re carving out a dedicated space to dive into the humble data sets and rankings that delight us but might otherwise escape notice.

Yes, cities are more diverse than rural areas — especially if you define “diverse” as less White, as we typically do in American English. On average, U.S. cities clock in at 56.6 percent White, compared with 83.5 percent in rural areas. But 1 in 4 metro areas — home to about 18.6 million people — are actually less diverse than the average rural area.

Pittsburgh, the largest such metro, is 84.9 percent White, according to the Census Bureau’s 2016-2020 American Community Survey. With 2.3 million residents, Pittsburgh is bigger than many more-diverse metros, including Las Vegas, Austin and San Jose.

The least-diverse metro areas are concentrated in Appalachia, the northern Great Plains and Rockies, and just outside major cities in the Midwest, such as Chicago, Minneapolis and Indianapolis.

The least diverse metro of all is Parkersburg-Vienna, alongside the Ohio River in West Virginia, at 95.1 percent White. Several other West Virginia metros join it in the top 10.

Statues paint an idiosyncratic portrait of American history. Consider Casimir Pulaski and Thaddeus Kosciuszko. The two Polish noblemen turned Revolutionary War generals are honored with more U.S. statues and monuments than all but a handful of native luminaries, according to the National Monument Audit.

The audit was a year-long project by Monument Lab to build a list of about 50,000 monuments from 42 smaller catalogues, such as the Historical Marker Database. It covers tributes from mighty Mount Rushmore to a small monument in Ohio that pays homage to the man who “brought the tuberous rooted begonia to this country from Belgium.” (That man was, of course, Carlton Lowe, who established Lowe’s Greenhouse in Chagrin Falls, Ohio, in 1926.)

Our colleague Gillian Brockell has already covered the report’s headline findings. A.) Half of the 50 most represented men owned other human beings. And B.) Women are so rarely represented that mermaids easily outnumber congresswomen. (Counts of men in statues include Pulaski, who some scholars believe may have been intersex.)

Top spots in the rankings hew closely to the national mythology. Abraham Lincoln leads, despite a notable lack of memorials in the South, followed by George Washington, Christopher Columbus — admittedly a controversial Italian who never set foot on the U.S. mainland — and Martin Luther King Jr.

But from there, the list unravels. There are more statues of Saint Francis of Assisi (another Italian), disgraced rebel Robert E. Lee and Pulaski than of Benjamin Franklin, John F. Kennedy, Thomas Jefferson and Ulysses S. Grant. Noted non-Americans Joan of Arc, Martin Luther, William Shakespeare and Kosciuszko all make the top 25.

A closer examination of the two noble Poles helps explain what’s going on. As brigadiers, Pulaski and Kosciuszko were outranked by more than 20 major generals in the Continental Army and its allies, yet they’ve outflanked pretty much every Revolutionary commander other than George Washington in the statuary sweepstakes. (The Frenchman Marquis de Lafayette has more statues than Kosciuszko but fewer than Pulaski).

The audit includes a data point that might explain this: It lists the groups that sponsored certain monuments. Among the sponsors for Pulaski? The Polish American Citizens of Northampton, Mass. And for Kosciuszko? The Polish National Alliance of America.

As it happens, a substantial share of the nation’s statues were erected during the age of mass migration, when waves of Polish people arrived in search of life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness — and some connection to their new country.

Ewa Barczyk, author of the forthcoming “Footsteps of Polonia: Polish Historical Sites Across North America,” said the Polish immigrants of that era, who often faced substantial discrimination, were eager to erect concrete symbols of the contributions they had made to their community.

“Earlier generations of Poles — the workers who came here, worked hard and were successful — built these huge, beautiful churches and erected many statues,” Barczyk said. “They wanted to have visible signs to show their faith. The statues were manifestations of pride for their fellow Poles who fought valiantly for freedom and symbolized the connection between Poland and America.”

That pattern of people repurposing figures of the past to meet the political needs of the present is noticeable throughout the database. The most common sponsor of all? The United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Like the Roman and Inca roads before them, interstate highways seem destined to shape the global economy long after the American empire has faded. They represent infrastructure at a scale that transforms entire regions and industries.

Together, interstates add more to the U.S. economy than all but six of the states they were built to link. According to a new analysis, the interstate system generates about $742 billion in trade-related activity every year — about as much as the state of Ohio.

The single most valuable interstate, I-80, bisects the continent with an almost 3,000-mile-long ribbon of pavement, linking the economic powerhouses of San Francisco and Teaneck, N.J. (Toledo, Des Moines, Omaha, Salt Lake City and Reno, Nev., lie in between.)

I-80 is the most valuable highway in part because it’s one of the longest. On a mile-for-mile basis, the most valuable major highway is I-75, which runs from Sault Ste. Marie in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula all the way down to the southern reaches of America’s Lower Peninsula, also known as the state of Florida.

These highways are economically important not just because they’re vital trade routes linking east with west and north with south, but also because few other viable alternatives exist along much of their length, according to a recent working paper from economists Taylor Jaworski and Sergey Nigai of the University of Colorado at Boulder and Carl Kitchens of Florida State University.

For their analysis, the economists built an elaborate economic model linking every county in the United States to the domestic and global markets. Their model accounts for myriad details, including the flow of goods between industries and countries, alternative water and rail routes, and the traffic congestion the interstates relieve — and create.

When all those factors are counted, interstates are worth several times more than previous estimates have shown, Jaworski said. But while all states bore the cost of the highways, the benefits weren’t spread equally, which suggests that future infrastructure packages could explore ways to make the direct beneficiaries foot more of the bill.

“We probably need to have some innovative thinking about how we have a 21st-century infrastructure and how we finance that,” Jaworski said.

The analysis doesn’t measure the ways interstates have destroyed value, such as displacing minority communities or causing air pollution that leads to early death, lower test scores and lower fertility. But Jaworski said we don’t yet know whether those drawbacks cancel out highways’ transformative contributions.

“The car and highways reshaped American life, and we can trace many of the benefits of these changes,” Jaworski said. “We know something about the costs, but less precisely.”

At the Department of Data, fun facts are serious business. See anything here we should investigate further? Or maybe there’s something else you want us to measure? Are you interested in the highest-income Hispanic communities, the neighborhoods with the least expensive homes, or why so many home buyers feel buyer’s remorse right now? Just ask!

If you follow the column here, we’ll send the answer to each question to your inbox as it publishes. If we use your idea in a column, we’ll send you a button and a membership card marking you as an official agent of the Department of Data. This week’s button goes to our Washington Post colleague Gillian Brockell.

National Hot Dog Day 2022: Deals, freebies from Nathan’s Famous, Philly Pretzel Factory and more

To get into the “holiday” spirit, several chains and franchises are offering free food and deals on Wednesday and beyond.Here are some of the deals and freebies you can get on and around July 20:Love’s Travel Stops: Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores are offering customers a free hot dog or roller grill item on July 20 to celebrate National Hot Dog Day. N...

To get into the “holiday” spirit, several chains and franchises are offering free food and deals on Wednesday and beyond.

Here are some of the deals and freebies you can get on and around July 20:

Love’s Travel Stops: Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores are offering customers a free hot dog or roller grill item on July 20 to celebrate National Hot Dog Day. Note this offer can only be redeemed through the Love’s Connect app, where customers can scan the barcode for the deal.

Nathan’s Famous: On July 20 at select restaurants, Nathan’s Famous is offering hot dogs for five cents with the purchase of one regular-priced hot dog. However, there’s a limit of two hot dogs per order.

Philly Pretzel Factory: This pretzel chain will be offering pretzel dogs for just $1.

Pilot Flying J: This travel stop is offering customers a buy one, get one free hot dog or grill item at the travel center. Shoppers must download the chain’s myRewards Plus app to redeem offer.

Rastelli’s: Get 15% on this hot dog retailer’s Original Round Dog or Wagyu Hot Dogs on National Hot Dog Day. You’ll have to use code DOGDAYS15 on July 20 only.

The Original Hot Dog Factory: Even though National Hot Dog Day is on July 20, this hot dog chain is celebrating the holiday on a Friday. On July 22, the chain is giving away free hot dogs across all locations between 12-4 p.m.

Vienna Beef: You can get $10 off Chicago style hot dog kits with online coupon code BGNDEJ. This offer is valid through July 31.

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Katherine Rodriguez can be reached at [email protected]. Have a tip? Tell us at nj.com/tips.

Restaurant inspired by the ‘sociable’ cuisine of Vienna opens in NJ

Chef Kurt Gutenbrunner runs the Michelin-starred Wallsé, the Austrian fine-dining spot in New York City, and is now bringing his talents to New Jersey.Gutenbrunner is opening a Viennese restaurant, Charley, in Harrison. You can expect Charley to be much more casual than Wallsé.I was able to speak with David Barry, hospitality investor behind Charley, about what you can expect from Charley:"We were looking to create a neighborhood bistro with inspired food and beverage offerings. My youngest son's name ...

Chef Kurt Gutenbrunner runs the Michelin-starred Wallsé, the Austrian fine-dining spot in New York City, and is now bringing his talents to New Jersey.

Gutenbrunner is opening a Viennese restaurant, Charley, in Harrison. You can expect Charley to be much more casual than Wallsé.

I was able to speak with David Barry, hospitality investor behind Charley, about what you can expect from Charley:

"We were looking to create a neighborhood bistro with inspired food and beverage offerings. My youngest son's name is Charley. His personality is curious, sociable, yet relaxed — very much the spirit of the bistro we were looking to create. I thought Charley was the perfect name to represent a human and approachable neighborhood spot."

"Charley is rooted in the culture of a Viennese kaffeehaus — a place where all walks of the community would gather from day to night to exchange ideas. While Viennese cuisine is historically important and delicious, it's rather unique in this area. Not only does Charley interpret great Viennese cuisine and approach it in new ways, but you can feel the strong community when you step into the bistro. Anyone should feel welcome to come in for dinner or a drink. Charley also expands onto a covered outdoor patio with fireplace, so it's a great place to grab a cocktail in the winter."

"Kurt recommends starting with the Berlin Currywurst — a shareable dish with spiced bratwurst and fries. Then ordering the shitake spätzle for your entrée — a delicious pasta dish with brussels sprouts, root vegetables, and alpine cheese. And the Linzertorte for dessert — a hazelnut tart with fresh raspberries and schlag (whipped cream)."

"To share with the table, we suggest the Flammkuchen, an Alsatian flatbread, that comes in bacon ("Farm") and mushroom ("Forest") varieties.

"The wiener schnitzel is a staple of Viennese cuisine, and Charley has a classic presentation served with a delicious potato-cucumber salad and lingonberry jam.

"For a drink, we highly suggest the Freudian Slip, our take on a mule, or a cold Bitburger beer with extra foam.

"And you can't miss dessert. Charley's apple strudel has been perfected by Chef Kurt Gutenbrunner and is not to be missed.

"We'll be adding brunch and lunch soon to make Charley a full coffee-to-cocktails environment."

You can visit Charley at 202 Angelo Cifelli Drive, Harrison, NJ 07029 and follow along on Instagram @Charley.Bistro.

Oh, Schnitz! New N.J. bistro is the Viennese knees: review

If schnitzel, spaetzle and strudel aren’t already part of your vocabulary, head over to Harrison.Newark’s tiny eastern suburb is likely best-known for its soccer — the New York Red Bulls have played in the looming arena off I-280 since 2010. But the Hudson County burg has also become a hot spot for young professionals and families — many whom have been priced out of New York but still desire direct access to the city via the PATH train.In turn, the small town has slowly and steadily become a dining desti...

If schnitzel, spaetzle and strudel aren’t already part of your vocabulary, head over to Harrison.

Newark’s tiny eastern suburb is likely best-known for its soccer — the New York Red Bulls have played in the looming arena off I-280 since 2010. But the Hudson County burg has also become a hot spot for young professionals and families — many whom have been priced out of New York but still desire direct access to the city via the PATH train.

In turn, the small town has slowly and steadily become a dining destination with the help of Ironstate Development. Their Jersey City Urby, a Jenga-like apartment building on the Hudson River, is home to an offshoot of NYC sushi and hand roll spot, DOMO DOMO, but owner David Barry wanted to switch things up at his Harrison Urby complex.

“I’ve always loved the vibe of the cafes in Vienna (Austria), so I asked my friend Kurt Gutenbrunner if he’d be interested in collaborating on a new concept with us,” Barry told NJ Advance Media.

And what a friend to have. Chef of NYC’s Michelin starred West Village haunt Wallsé (and Wallsé Next Door), Gutenbrunner’s mastery of Viennese cuisine and enthusiasm for art combined with Barry’s knack for design and hospitality created the perfect storm for Harrison.

In early February, a Viennese bistro called Charley was born.

“The dishes here are elevated, but still maintain a casual way about them, which match the design of the restaurant,” Gutenbrunner explained.

Drawing inspiration from the infamous American Bar and coffee houses in Vienna, the duo imported and reupholstered vintage Austrian chairs and dedicated an entire wall to art and music posters.

“In Vienna, musicians and artists would come to perform and do exhibitions, and the coffeehouses would just leave them up. I had a bunch of art and we collected some posters and created something similar here,” Guttenbrunner said.

And the name? Aside from Barry’s son (Charley), they decided that it reflected the easy, all-welcoming concept that they created both independently and as a part of Urby. Now on to the eats!

The good

Charley’s menu is robust and enticing, which made it difficult for me to narrow down what I wanted to taste. Broken down into “To Share,” salads, “On a Bun” (imported pretzel buns from Germany to be exact), soups, “On a Plate,” “Mini Tartine,” sides and Viennese sweets, one could easily take a traditional Austrian food tour or venture toward more nouveaux twists. Drinks included a list of cocktails, a selection of German and other beers as well as a full, Austrian-heavy wine list.

For this visit, I stuck with mostly traditional fare, desiring to taste what Guttenbrunner is famous for (also giving me a reason to return in the future).

Salads are often overlooked when dining out, but for me, a well-executed plate of greens showcases a chef’s ability to combine and dress raw ingredients with minimal treatment. The green bean and arugula salad ($11) was a light and refreshing compliment to the heavier dishes I chose, yet still maintained enough complexity to keep me interested. One could claim that I overdid it on the arugula (featured in another dish I tried) but I’d argue this salad is worth doubling down on thanks to the tender and slightly sweet green beans, toasted almonds, zippy radishes and perfectly acidic vinaigrette. I demolished it without hesitation.

Weiner Schnitzel ($26) is the Austrian counterpart to my Milanese food crush, cottoletta. It’s also one of the dishes that Gutenbrunner brought over from Wallsé, so sampling it was a given. A pair of crispy, golden fried veal medallions were set down in front of me with a lemon wedge, much like my beloved Italian version, but the accoutrements gently reminded me I wasn’t in Italy anymore. A cold, creamy, dill-flecked potato and cucumber salad and barely tart lingonberry compote made for a beautiful plate but an even more complex play of flavors. I moved my way around the plate like a pinball, only longing for an additional lemon slice to add a bit more acid to an otherwise very balanced dish.

Another standout was an item that hadn’t actually made it onto the menu yet. Chef whizzed by on his way to the kitchen muttering “do you like chocolate?” in passing. I nodded and shrugged, both affirming my love for it and revealing my confusion as he reemerged with a work of art. “This is flourless chocolate (cake). It’s not on the menu yet, but give it a try.” I had hit the lottery. Dollops of dense yet creamy chocolate mousse sat atop a surprisingly crunchy darker chocolate layer, all supported by a somewhat crisp, slightly sticky, caramelized crust. “It’s taken me 50 years to figure this out,” he shared when I asked what was in it. Turns out, the crust layer involves corn flakes, but that’s all that he would disclose. As rich and chocolatey as it was, I found myself going back for additional bites of that addictive texture flex.

The bad

While I had an enjoyable experience at Charley, a few dishes for which I had high expectations missed the mark. I started with the Forest Flammkuchen ($12), a vegetarian flatbread consisting of shiitake mushrooms, caramelized onions, sour cream and arugula. The crust was crispy, but that was just about the only win for me. If you’re not an onion lover, you will not enjoy this Austrian pizzette, and even if you do enjoy them, the heavy handed use here was overkill. I appreciated the intended harmony of flavors — smokiness from the mushrooms, peppery bite from the arugula, tang of the sour cream and sweetness of the onions — but the imbalance of ingredients and overall dryness (could’ve benefited from more sour cream) didn’t hit for me.

Let’s talk about spaetzle for a minute. It’s essentially pasta that’s pushed through a mess strainer, straight into boiling water and finished in a skillet with butter and/or other flavor-enhancing ingredients. Pasta is in my DNA, so I was really intrigued by Gutenbrunner’s irregular little dumplings. I opted for the side dish ($7) versus the entree, a more classic preparation made with quark. While I enjoyed the sprinkling of fresh herbs and slightly browned bits, I yearned for more flavor and texture (I couldn’t detect the quark), leaving it a bit too mellow and monotonous for me.

Dining at Charley highlighted the parallels between traditional Viennese and well-loved all-American sweets. Where they differ for the most part, is in the presentation. Theres a certain sophistication that Gutenbrunner nails, as exemplified by another Wallsé import, the apple strudel. This thing was a far cry from the Entenmann’s version I grew up on and unlike a traditional apple pie, was a bit more complex. It was also a little on the dry side. Served at room temp with a side of shlag (a fun, Viennese moniker for whipped cream), the strudel had a pleasantly flaky crust. I enjoyed the lightly spiced apples, but the texture of the filling reminded me of a hot dish that had gone cold. Usually offended by the inclusion of raisins, I didn’t mind them here as they were very small and used with extreme restraint. The most disappointing element of the strudel was the runny, deflated schlag, which I could tell was homemade, but wasn’t whipped until luxuriously thick. I could imagine the strudel being infinitely better warm out of the oven accompanied by a schlag with structural integrity.

The vibe

Simply put, I felt cool dining at Charley. They really nailed the neo-bistro vibe with the mix of rich textures, lighting, cozy furnishings and complimentary soundtrack. I happened to dine over sunset, so I got to experience the chameleon-like, day-to-night magic, which Charley’s dining room made look effortless. Flanked by lush green plants, marble-topped, metal-rimmed tables nestled up against tan leather banquettes basked in the sun that poured in from the large windows in the front of the dining room. Once the sun set, the lights dimmed, candles were lit, and the mix of Euro rock, hip-hop and British punk made for a seamless transition into evening-mode. A somewhat secret heated patio, complete with a working fireplace, opens up to the street and will soon serve as an extension of the dining room and an al fresco option during the warmer months.

The bottom line

Harrison has gained a gem with Charley. It’s destination dining delivered by a Michelin chef in hip, cozy digs, making it a great for a date, business meal, family or solo dinner. Friendly staff and the chef’s passionate enthusiasm made it that much more enjoyable. Your NYC friends will undoubtedly give you crap about schlepping to Harrison, but don’t stress. Charley will charm them with schnitzel.

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Stephanie Rizzolo may be reached at [email protected]. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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East Brunswick Public Library Presents "The Jews of Austria and Vienna Before the Holocaust"

EAST BRUNSWICK, NJ— East Brunswick Public Library continues its annual Holocaust Remembrance Program series with "The Jews of Austria and Vienna Before the Holocaust." This multi-media program of lecture and music will take place at the East Brunswick Community Arts Center (721 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick) on Sunday, April 24, at 2 pm.The program is dedicated to the late Dr. Michael Kesler, who organized this program series since its inception in 2014. "The intent of the series is to br...

EAST BRUNSWICK, NJ East Brunswick Public Library continues its annual Holocaust Remembrance Program series with "The Jews of Austria and Vienna Before the Holocaust." This multi-media program of lecture and music will take place at the East Brunswick Community Arts Center (721 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick) on Sunday, April 24, at 2 pm.

The program is dedicated to the late Dr. Michael Kesler, who organized this program series since its inception in 2014. "The intent of the series is to bring to light the legacy of my Jewish ancestors, prior to their annihilation during the Shoah," he said during an interview in 2018.

After his retirement in 2006, Kesler wrote three books of his and his late wife's experiences during World War II. His last book, The Remnant, was published in April 2021.

"Our aim is to commemorate and celebrate the rich historical and cultural contributions of Jewish communities," he added. "It is our way of honoring and keeping alive their legacy, so that these once-thriving civilizations from whom many among us are descended, are never forgotten."

Historian Glenn Dynner will lecture on the history and culture of Austrian Jewry. In the early 19th century, Vienna became the cultural center of western civilization. His presentation focuses on the impact of the Jewish community on the Austrian capital city.

Dynner is the author of several books, including "Men of Silk: The Hasidic Conquest of Polish Jewish Society" and "Yankel's Tavern: Jews, Liquor & Life in the Kingdom of Poland." He was a Fulbright scholar and member of the Princeton Institute for Advanced Studies. In 2019, he received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship to study how the Hasidic movement emerged in the early 20th century.

Following the presentation, a concert will feature classical Jewish Austrian compositions performed by an ensemble of local musicians. They will be under the direction of Dave Schlossberg, an accomplished pianist, who was awarded a Silver Medal for Outstanding Achievement from the Global Music Awards in 2021.

May Kesler, the founder of contemporary dance company Keslerdances, will lead a choreographed performance of traditional Jewish and Austrian dances.

"The Jews of Austria and Vienna Before the Holocaust" is sponsored through a partnership of the East Brunswick Public Library and the East Brunswick Arts Commission.

The program is free and open to the public, with limited seating at the Community Arts Center. Additional information about this event can be found at www.ebpl.org/calendar.

Welcome to TAP into East Brunswick's weekly update of news and events from the East Brunswick Public Library. These columns are brought to you by Christopher Barnes, the voice of EBPL's online outreach.

Christopher Barnes

East Brunswick Public Library

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East Brunswick, NJ 08816

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