HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Englewood, NJ

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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Englewood, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Englewood, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
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Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Englewood, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Englewood, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Englewood, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Englewood, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Englewood, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Englewood, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Englewood, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Englewood, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Englewood, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Englewood, NJ

NJ recycling: How does your county rank?

During o the 1990s more than 50% of municipal waste in the Garden State was being recycled, but since that time our numbers have dipped.Today the combined municipal recycling rate in New Jersey has dropped below 40%, but in many respects, recycling is a lot more complex than it used to be.For years, many kinds of refuse, especially plastic containers, were all shipped off to China to be recycled, but starting in 2018 the Chinese no longer accepted a lot of recyclable material from the U.S., which means towns and counties in New...

During o the 1990s more than 50% of municipal waste in the Garden State was being recycled, but since that time our numbers have dipped.

Today the combined municipal recycling rate in New Jersey has dropped below 40%, but in many respects, recycling is a lot more complex than it used to be.

For years, many kinds of refuse, especially plastic containers, were all shipped off to China to be recycled, but starting in 2018 the Chinese no longer accepted a lot of recyclable material from the U.S., which means towns and counties in New Jersey that had been getting paid to dispose of their recyclables suddenly has to start paying to have the material recycled.

Doug O’Malley, the director of Environment New Jersey, said while the Garden State recycling rate is better than some other states, it’s not where it should be.

"Every ton of garbage that’s not recycled, it goes somewhere. There’s no trash fairy, so it either goes to a landfill or it ends up being burned at an incinerator in our community," he said.

He said some New Jersey counties have enacted a county-wide recycling program but what materials are ultimately collected for recycling may differ from town to town.

"Some towns require dual stream recycling where you have to separate out your glass and your paper and plastics, and some counties and towns just have a straight single stream method where they will do the sorting after the material is collected," he said

The state Department of Environmental Protection keeps track of recycling efforts in each county, and some do better than others.

In North Jersey, the leader is Bergen County. Mercer and Middlesex do well in Central Jersey. Cape May and Cumberland score best in South Jersey.

Counties that are recycle-challenged include Hunterdon, Hudson, Union and Atlantic.

To see how your County is ranked by the DEP for recycling you can look here.

O’Malley pointed out that recycling coordinators in different parts of the state oversee different programs, while reminding local residents "that recycling isn’t just a good thing that someone else does, it’s a good thing that everyone should do."

He said to expand the amount of material that will be recycled in Jersey local residents should start asking questions

"Do you have a recycling coordinator in your town, and is that person getting out there and educating more people in the community, and is there enforcement if people aren’t recycling?"

He said some Jersey residents wind up “wishcycling,” putting things in the recycling bin they would like to think should be recycled, such as a bowling ball, but in fact are not recyclable materials, and this slows down the entire recycling process.

"Only 5% of plastics are recycled in this country so just because something is recyclable doesn’t mean it will be recycled," O'Malley said.

Information about residential and business recycling in New Jersey, including what you can recycle in your town and county, is available here.

David Matthau is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about feedback or a correction for this story.

Gold, Silver, Bronze Award Wins For Bergen County Enrichment Students

All five students in Bergen County ACT-SO took home gold, silver or bronze in a recent state competition for scholarship awards.BERGEN COUNTY, NJ — All five students in a Bergen County youth enrichment program sponsored by the NAACP took home either gold, silver or bronze in a recent state competition for scholarship awards.Bergen County Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO) students, who performed at the competition, were recognized in Facebook post from Englewood Mayor Michael Wildes on Tu...

All five students in Bergen County ACT-SO took home gold, silver or bronze in a recent state competition for scholarship awards.

BERGEN COUNTY, NJ — All five students in a Bergen County youth enrichment program sponsored by the NAACP took home either gold, silver or bronze in a recent state competition for scholarship awards.

Bergen County Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO) students, who performed at the competition, were recognized in Facebook post from Englewood Mayor Michael Wildes on Tuesday.

An Englewood sophomore and Teaneck senior, a news release said, each won gold medals for their performances and will be going to the national convention this weekend in Atlantic City to compete.

Quincy Eby, of Englewood, placed in classical instrumental music performance, and Tyson Sanders, of Teaneck, placed in contemporary vocal performance, ACT-SO Bergen County said on Facebook.

Eby received a bronze medal in the same category last year, earning him a 2022 Governor's Award for the Arts, the organized said.

Additionally, an Englewood sophomore earned a silver medal for his performance, and two Paterson students each won a bronze medal for other skills.

Miles Eby, of Englewood, placed in Classical Music Performance and Oratory. Samantha Mendez placed in photography, and Karla Benoit placed in short story writing.

Miles Eby is also a 2022 Governor's Award for the Arts recipient for his performance in the same category last year, as is Mendez for photography.

""It is wonderful to see the improvement (the students) made to earn these medals," Bergen County ACT-SO chair Adrienne Warrick said in a statement. "I am so very proud of them working with us remotely during the (coronavirus) pandemic and not giving up on their dreams, while sharing and enhancing their talents and skills,"

For more information about the NAACP and ACT-SO, please send an email to [email protected] or visit actsonewjersey.org, or bergennaacp.org.

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Proposed homeless shelter in Flemington, NJ has people fuming

This is one of those moments that should make you stare deep into your soul.People in Flemington were expected to pack a public meeting Tuesday night over a proposed homeless shelter in a nice residential neighborhood.The house at 8 New York Ave. is owned by the Cavalry Episcopal Church and at present is used for Sunday school classes and office space.But Family Promise is a nonprofit that wants to convert the house into a homeless shelter for displaced families.More than 30 years ago people of different faiths fr...

This is one of those moments that should make you stare deep into your soul.

People in Flemington were expected to pack a public meeting Tuesday night over a proposed homeless shelter in a nice residential neighborhood.

The house at 8 New York Ave. is owned by the Cavalry Episcopal Church and at present is used for Sunday school classes and office space.

But Family Promise is a nonprofit that wants to convert the house into a homeless shelter for displaced families.

More than 30 years ago people of different faiths from Hunterdon County churches formed a group to provide temporary housing for homeless folks and they’ve been doing that at a facility in surrounding Raritan Township. Now they want a land use variance in order to use the building on New York Avenue in the middle of a quiet residential neighborhood to house more people.

Some neighbors aren’t having it. Signs reading STOP THE SHELTER have gone up on lawns. People are nervous and angry. The meeting Tuesday night was expected to be so heavily attended they were holding it not at the borough hall but on Stangl Road at a place normally serving as a farmer’s market.

Family Promise says its “proposed supervised transitional housing for children and families experiencing homelessness satisfies a desperate need of the County of Hunterdon.”

They’re not wrong. According to MyCentralJersey.com, they are the only homeless shelter serving the entire county. Which happens to be one of the richest counties in the country, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t unfortunate souls who fall on bleak times. What are they to do?

Yet I also understand the fear of those fighting against it. I’m sure they’re greatly concerned about their property values. It’s likely they’re worried about potential problems being caused by homeless people in the place they raise their kids.

Family Promise says the stories of those who needed their services are heartbreaking. On their website, they share this video of some of them telling their tales.

I understand the neighbors complaining about the project are just looking out for their own families. But isn’t there something to be said for society looking out for each other, too? How do you turn your back on people facing this?

Hard questions with no easy answers. And answers will have to wait more weeks. At the last minute Tuesday night, a postponement was called until Sept. 13 due to the attorney for Family Promise falling ill, according to former Flemington councilman Joey Novick.

The stop the shelter signs will stay up until then, and people facing desperate nights will no doubt have more of them.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite afternoon radio show any day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now.

NJ summer camps hosting refugee children from Ukraine

Play is a universal language for kids.That's why select camps throughout the Garden State have opted to host children from war-torn Ukraine, free of charge, for summer 2022."I felt that camp could be a fantastic healing experience for these kids, and I think we we were pretty dead-on with that," said Jonathan Gold, who directs Tamarack Day Camp in Randolph, Oak Crest Day Camp in Somerset, and Pine Grove Day Camp in Wall.The three locations are handling a total of a dozen or so children whose families fled Ukrai...

Play is a universal language for kids.

That's why select camps throughout the Garden State have opted to host children from war-torn Ukraine, free of charge, for summer 2022.

"I felt that camp could be a fantastic healing experience for these kids, and I think we we were pretty dead-on with that," said Jonathan Gold, who directs Tamarack Day Camp in Randolph, Oak Crest Day Camp in Somerset, and Pine Grove Day Camp in Wall.

The three locations are handling a total of a dozen or so children whose families fled Ukraine to live with loved ones in the Garden State.

"We gave them all full scholarships to camp this summer," Gold said.

The children range from age 5 to pre-teen, Gold said.

There is a language barrier, but staffers use online translators when necessary. And, Gold was surprised to learn that some staff members could speak Ukrainian or Russian.

Youth, though, instinctively know how to interact with one another, he noted.

"I don't care what language it is, I don't care what country you come from — if you can start to understand a game, you can communicate, and that's what we've seen happen," Gold said.

This isn’t the first time camps have responded to children affected by tragedy, according to the American Camp Association, NY and NJ. Through the Association's Heal the Children program, camps offered free services to children who lost a parent on Sept. 11, 2001, and again to children whose homes were damaged by Sandy in October 2012.

"Providing children with a rewarding summer at camp is one small way we can help them overcome adversity," said Alicia Skovera, executive director.

On a national level, the American Camp Association worked with the U.S. Department of State to place more than 100 Ukrainian high school exchange students at overnight camps across the country.

Dino Flammia is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about feedback or a correction for this story.

What would happen to NJ if we were attacked by nuclear weapons?

We used NUKEMAP by Alex Wellerstein to see what would happen if a nuclear warhead hit New York, Philadelphia, Washington or New Jersey.

The models show what would happen in aerial detonation, meaning the bomb would be set off in the sky, causing considerable damage to structures and people below; or what would happen in a ground detonation, which would have the alarming result of nuclear fallout. The models do not take into account the number of casualties that would result from fallout.

Gallery Credit: Eric Scott

New York City - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt as far away as Newark, Elizabeth, Nutley, Fort Lee and Englewood. Buildings would be damaged or destroyed.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns throughout Jersey City, Union, and Cliffside Park.

It would likely destroy or severely damage Newark Liberty International Airport, the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, George Washington Bridge and the rail tunnels under the Hudson River.

Deaths: 1.6 million

Injuries: 2.9 million

New York City - Ground Impact with fallout

It would likely destroy or severely damage Newark Liberty International Airport, the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, George Washington Bridge and the rail tunnels under the Hudson River.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns in West New York and Fort Lee. Fallout would generally be carried away from New Jersey as far away as New Hampshire.

Deaths: 1.3 million

Injuries: 1.4 million

Philadelphia - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route 1 corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange.

Buildings would be destroyed as far away as Deptford, Voorhees, Riverside and Delanco.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Haddonfield, Cherry Hill, Cinnaminson and Riverton.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading as far away as Middletown and Neptune to the East and Mount Olive to the West.

Deaths: 539,000

Injuries: 845,000

Philadelphia - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would be felt as far away as Cherry Hill, Deptford, Maple Shade and Moorestown.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Trenton, Plainfield, East Orange and Yonkers.

Deaths: 441,000

Injuries: 409,000

Trenton, NJ - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route One corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange and into New York City.

Buildings would be destroyed from Burlington to Coxs Corner, Princeton, Plainsboro and Pennington.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Bordentown to Crosswicks, Lawrence and Ewing.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading across most of Central and North Jersey into New York City and as far as Stamford, Connecticut.

Deaths: 126,000

Trenton, NJ - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would reverberate across the Delaware River to Philadelphia with shockwaves that would reach down to Burlington in the South and Upper Freehold to the East.

Buildings would be destroyed from Mansfield to Crosswicks and Princeton.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Long Branch to Bedminster, Morristown, Spring Valley and Fort Lee.

Deaths: 108,000

New Brunswick - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route One corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange and into New York City.

Rutgers University, SoFi Stadium and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from, Kingston to Marlboro, South Amboy, Woodbridge, Plainfield and Somerville.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Kendal Park to Spotswood, Metuchen, South Plainfield and Millstone.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading across most of Central and North Jersey into New York City and as far as Stamford, CT.

Deaths: 140,000

New Brunswick - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would reverberate across the Delaware River to Philadelphia with shockwaves that would reach down to Burlington in the South and Upper Freehold to the East.

Rutgers University, SoFi Stadium and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from Spotswood to Millstone, Bound Brook, South Plainfield and Spotswood.

Thermal radiation would cause 3rd degree burns from Franklin Park to Woodbridge, East Brunswick, Sayreville and South Bound Brook.

Fallout would carry Northeast as far away as Elizabeth, Newark, New York City and Nashua, New Hampshire.

Deaths: 108,000

Atlantic City, NJ - Aerial Detonation

While a nuclear blast in Atlantic City would spare most of inland New Jersey, it would destroy the barrier islands from Long Port to Toms River.

The casinos would fall, the boardwalks would burn and the sand would be contaminated for a generation. Atlantic City International Airport would be leveled.

Buildings would be destroyed from Pleasantville to Margate and Brigantine.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Linwood to Galloway and Longport.

Deaths: 57,000

Atlantic City, NJ - Ground Impact with fallout

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Longport to Barnegat Light.

Fallout would drift mostly out to sea, but would hit the Eastern half of Long Island up to Rhode Island.

Deaths: 57,000

Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ - Aerial Detonation

While New Jersey does have a handful of military targets, the primary target is likely the Joint Base.

If a nuclear missle were to detonate over the base, the entire facility would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from Mount Holly to Manchester Township, Bordentown, Allentown and Red Valley.

Thermal radiation would cause third degree burns from Pemberton to Plumsted and Chesterfield.

Deaths: 14,000

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Whitesbog to Georgetown and Arneytown.

Fallout would carry Northwest through Millstone, Freehold, Holmdel and Highlands and stretch all the way to Massachusetts.

Deaths: 9,000

Washington, DC - Aerial Detonation

The entire DC area would be reduced to rubble, including the White House, Congress, Pentagon and monuments. Andrews Air Force Base, Annapolis and Arlington National Cemetery would be destroyed.

Deaths: 505,000

Washington, DC - Ground Impact with fallout

The entire DC area would be reduced to rubble and buildings would be destroyed from Alexandria, Virginia, to Silver Spring and Bethesda, Maryland.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns up to six miles from ground zero.

Fallout would carry Northwest through Baltimore, Philadelphia into Trenton and as far as the Northern New Jersey border.

Deaths: 415,000

Injuries: 381,000

‘Anxious time in the world’: Need for mental health services for youth remains dire

You’ve seen data. Dr. Hillary Cohen has seen that and more.The emergency room physician, a senior vice president of medical affairs at Englewood Health, has also seen the suffering behind the numbers.Captured in recent surveys from local and national organizations, New Jersey’s youngest residents are showing up more often to ERs and other hospital inpatient settings due to anxiety, depression, self-harm and other behavioral health complai...

You’ve seen data. Dr. Hillary Cohen has seen that and more.

The emergency room physician, a senior vice president of medical affairs at Englewood Health, has also seen the suffering behind the numbers.

Captured in recent surveys from local and national organizations, New Jersey’s youngest residents are showing up more often to ERs and other hospital inpatient settings due to anxiety, depression, self-harm and other behavioral health complaints.

“These aren’t cases you can follow up with on an outpatient basis, these are individuals in an acute mental health crisis that requires hospitalization,” she said. “And these also aren’t patients who are 16, 17 or 18 years old, it’s increasingly those 10, 11 and 12 years old in which we’re seeing a higher level of acuity.”

Cohen said the bump behavioral health providers are experiencing in the volume of youth and adolescents in crisis exceeds pre-pandemic levels. It’s not leveling off or on the retreat.

She and other sector leaders have their own ideas when speculating on the reasons for it, with all acknowledging that there’s a perfect storm of factors at play that will keep this trend moving in the same direction for the immediate future.

“It’s an anxious time in the world, with enough going on that anyone might feel anxious,” Cohen said. “Youth are often protected from those realities. In a way, that bubble has burst.”

One of the state’s largest inpatient psychiatric programs, Bergen New Bridge Medical Center‘s, has seen upticks in all behavioral health service areas since the pandemic was declared just over two years ago, according to CEO and President Deborah Visconi.

“Even as we’re looking toward emerging out of the pandemic, we’re still continuing to see an uptick in the need for services,” she said. “And, we’re seeing that significant uptick in the need children and adolescents have for services.”

There’s a constant jostling for space in the hospital’s pediatric program, a unit specialized in dealing with patients — who otherwise wind up in one of the state’s generalized emergency rooms.

Responding to the patient surge, Bergen New Bridge has introduced a clinic-based mental health program called the Hope & Resiliency Center for Youth. The program’s multidisciplinary program provides treatment for youth just discharged from inpatient settings as well as providing adolescents in outpatient programs with a more structured level of intervention.

In introducing new programs, organizations still have to contend with reimbursement from health plan payers not being what it should be for acute behavioral health care, Visconi said. That poses a secondary challenge when hiring to fill out new programs.

Debra Wentz, CEO of the New Jersey Association of Mental Health and Addiction Agencies, said that, even with Gov. Phil Murphy’s budget offering funding for the industry and its workers, it didn’t cover every professional.

As the trade association leader describes it, behavioral health reimbursement has been at the bottom of the food chain for so long, it’ll be hard to undo the sentiment expressed in a National Council for Mental Wellbeing survey from last year. To wit, 97% of behavioral health providers find it difficult to recruit, with 82% saying retention was a problem, too.

That has led to pre-pandemic staffing levels having to meet post-pandemic demand for youth mental health services. And that demand is deathly serious, Wentz said.

A New Jersey Hospital Association review found that not only are depression and anxiety increasing in those ages 12 to 17, that age group saw a 95% rise in self-harm cases between 2019 and 2021. National Alliance on Mental Illness data indicates that nearly 20% of high school students report thoughts of suicide, and 9% attempted to take their lives. Actual suicide rates in younger age brackets are trending up, according to various surveys.

“As for why that is, it’s a little bit of everything,” Visconi said. “Of course, there’s the isolation that’s been talked about from students not being in school during the pandemic, and youth not able to go out and do activities as social programs were canceled. There’s also the unemployment rates among caregivers, increased domestic violence and drug abuse affecting families.”

Local mental health leaders add the sometimes-pernicious influence of social media and technology hindering reported sleep today in the youth stress mix.

Exacerbating all that is the proliferation of mass shooting events, such as the May shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, in which 19 children were slain. Wentz said that feeling of lacking safety can weigh heavily on youth.

Those events have cast a new spotlight on mental health in the country, with mixed feelings for industry leaders such as Wentz. She welcomes the funding. But it’s inaccurate, she said, to paint that funding as having a direct correlation with preventing mass shootings.

Although it might be a talking point, the link between those behavioral conditions, including serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, and violent behavior hasn’t been established in research literature. A 2015 study from Duke University School of Medicine and other institutions found that those with serious mental illness with no past exposure to violence or drug or alcohol use demonstrated a 2% rate of violent behavior — the same as the wider population.

“So, I feel there’s an unfair stigmatization of individuals with serious mental illness going on,” Wentz said.

Wentz always looks for the silver lining. Here, it’s the new bipartisan interest in improving mental health.

There’s been magnified attention recently to mental illness disorders, experts in the sector agree. And part of that is a recognition that these disorders are coming to bear on the lives of young individuals today much more transparently.

“The bright side, if there is one, is that kids and their families are no longer viewing mental health as a stigma,” Visconi said. “They’re more willing to come in to get help.”

In theory, as public health expert Adeola Sonaike explained, women’s professional sports teams have shared locker room psychology resources with men’s teams under team ownership structures.

In practice, she adds, when divvying up the mental health budget pie, what women athletes were afforded left something to be desired.

That’s just a small slice of what the mental health sector is trying to right. For Sonaike, who was in June named chief operating officer of Cedar Grove-based Baker Street Behavioral Health, addressing inequities in access to behavioral health care tops the sector’s priority list.

Among other things, Sonaike’s organization is working to ensure sports psychologists are equally as available to female athletes as their male counterparts. To that end, one of Baker Street Health’s partnerships is with a professional local women’s hockey team, the Metropolitan Riveters.

Sonaike examines the state’s mental health landscape as a whole through an equity lens, as a field prone to disparities in the level of care afforded to individuals, particularly those in different socioeconomic groups.

“Up until very recently, people who had access to mental health care were those who could afford to pay out of pocket, with insurance covering it only if you had good insurance,” she said.

In Sonaike’s view, the pandemic only underscored existing pocketbook-tied inequities. The sector’s leaders agree that getting Jerseyans to seek behavioral health provider care is difficult enough without layering on the challenges of socioeconomic, racial and ethnic disparities.

When it comes to concrete issues, wait times for behavioral health care among Medicaid patients is a hurdle.

“Not all providers accept it, and those that do typically are not using it as the bread and butter of their practice and will cap the number they can accept at any given time,” Sonaike said. “That creates a massive backlog of people on waiting lists. And there’s other issues, too. You have issues with transportation to appointments, people not able to time days off of work. Telehealth can play a role there … but you still need a cellphone, tablet or laptop with a camera.”

The New Jersey Association of Mental Health and Addiction Agencies and the behavioral organizations it represents have taken action on these issues, and pushed policymakers to do so, too.

There’s progress still to be made, according to Debra Wentz, the trade organization’s head. But with the attention these issues are receiving — plus more funding from state and federal leaders for programs meant to address them — there’s an increasingly solid foundation, she believes, that a better system can be built on.

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