HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Morris Plains, NJ

Let's Talk!

HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Morris Plains, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

 Human Growth Hormone Morris Plains, NJ

Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Morris Plains, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

 Ipamorelin Morris Plains, NJ

Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Morris Plains, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Morris Plains, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Morris Plains, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Morris Plains, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Morris Plains, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Morris Plains, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Morris Plains, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Morris Plains, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Morris Plains, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Morris Plains, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Morris Plains, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Morris Plains, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number973-587-8638

Request a Consultation

Latest News in Morris Plains, NJ

NJ is now under drought watch. How this could impact your water use

New Jersey is moving closer to drought status as reservoir levels, stream flow and groundwater gauges have all declined sharply this summer due to record heat and low rainfall, state officials said Tuesday.Environmental Protection Commissioner Shawn LaTourette issued a statewide drought watch Tuesday, the first step toward declaring a full drought, and called for residents and businesses to conserve water. If conditions do not improve, mandatory water use restrictions in parts of the state may become necessary, LaTouret...

New Jersey is moving closer to drought status as reservoir levels, stream flow and groundwater gauges have all declined sharply this summer due to record heat and low rainfall, state officials said Tuesday.

Environmental Protection Commissioner Shawn LaTourette issued a statewide drought watch Tuesday, the first step toward declaring a full drought, and called for residents and businesses to conserve water. If conditions do not improve, mandatory water use restrictions in parts of the state may become necessary, LaTourette said in a briefing to reporters.

"When we look out at temperature outlook and precipitation outlook, we continue to be concerned," he said.

South Jersey has gotten less rain and aquifer levels are down. But LaTourette said he is particularly concerned with two of North Jersey's largest sources of water: the Wanaque Reservoir and the Oradell Reservoir, whose levels have taken a sharp dive since early June.

Lack of rain and high demand due to the heat are driving the problem.

Over the past 90 days, much of New Jersey has received 25% to 50% less rain than average. It has gotten much worse in the past 30 days when much of the state was 50% to 75% below average, according to the National Weather Service.

This July was the sixth hottest July on record in New Jersey with an average temperature of 78.1 degrees. It was also the 13th driest with an average of only 2.19 inches of rain, 2.52 inches below normal, according to a report released this week by the Office of the State Climatologist.

Summer of the spotted lanternfly in NJ:How much damage has been done?

The lack of rainfall has hit the state's second largest drinking water source − the Wanaque Reservoir − particularly hard.

The reservoir was at 66.3% as of early Tuesday after having been close to capacity in early June. Its backup − the Monksville Reservoir − has remained at just above 100% capacity. The system operated by the North Jersey Water Supply Commission provides water for up to 3 million people in 12 counties.

Veolia's reservoir system, which serves 800,000 in Bergen and Hudson counties, had also dropped 30 percentage points from early June when it was above capacity to mid-July when it was hovering around 70%. The system, which includes the Oradell Reservoir, Woodcliff Lake and Lake Tappan, had rebounded a bit thanks to a recent torrential downpour and stood at 80% as of Aug. 1, the latest data available shows.

"It's those systems that are providing for suburban communities where there is a lot of outdoor water use that are declining steeply," said Steve Domber, section chief for the DEP's Division of Water Supply.

The state's two largest cities have fared better. Newark's reservoirs in upper Passaic County have been at or near capacity for much of the summer while Jersey City's reservoirs in Morris County have dropped below average this month to about 85%.

A large portion of Central Jersey including parts or all of Monmouth, Middlesex, Union, Somerset, Hunterdon and Mercer counties were experiencing a "moderate drought" as of Aug. 2, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Drought conditions also extended into the southern parts of Essex and Hudson counties while large swaths of North Jersey and South Jersey were considered "abnormally dry." The report is updated every Thursday.

DEP officials said continued conservation from reducing lawn waterings to covering a pool when it's not in use will help. But it will still take regular rainfall to get the state out of this situation.

"It takes weeks and months to get into a drought and it takes weeks to get out of a drought," Domber said.

For subscribers:Major tax break for NJ residents left out of Dems' $740B bill. Is it gone for good?

That may prove difficult. In recent years, September and October have been very warm, according to reports by David Robinson, the State Climatologist. Outside of extreme events like the remnants of Hurricane Ida last year, those months have also been relatively dry.

Still, drought emergencies are rare. The last drought watch declared in New Jersey was in 2016. The last drought emergency with mandatory water use restrictions came in 2002.

Domber said there wasn't a certain reservoir capacity level that would trigger a drought emergency. It's a combination of data, he said.

Meanwhile, an unknown amount of water was lost Tuesday when a 72-inch water main broke in Essex County. The mishap at Branch Brook Park on the border of Newark and Belleville caused low water pressure and a boil advisory for several towns.

Morris County Officials Tour the 3rd Largest Propane Distributor in the Nation

HANOVER, NJ - To learn more about Suburban Propane's energy production and clean -energy developments, The Morris County Board of County Commissioners joined New Jersey legislators, local officials and the Morris County Chamber of Commerce in a tour of Suburban Propane’s Whippany headquarters.“We greatly appreciate the opportunity to host today's Morris County Chamber of Commerce meeting, and to have this rare moment to share our work with our state and local representatives,” said Michael Stivala, President and CEO ...

HANOVER, NJ - To learn more about Suburban Propane's energy production and clean -energy developments, The Morris County Board of County Commissioners joined New Jersey legislators, local officials and the Morris County Chamber of Commerce in a tour of Suburban Propane’s Whippany headquarters.

“We greatly appreciate the opportunity to host today's Morris County Chamber of Commerce meeting, and to have this rare moment to share our work with our state and local representatives,” said Michael Stivala, President and CEO of Suburban Propane. “For almost 95 years, commitment to our local communities has been at the forefront of our company values, and we look forward to supporting our community well into the future through our growing relationship with the Chamber.”

Stivala spoke to the group about Suburban’s growth over the years and its efforts to promote propane as a clean-energy resource, noting its potential “is often overlooked” as the national debate moves forward on transitioning to energy sources that reduce carbon outputs.

Commissioner Director Tayfun Selen, Deputy Director John Krickus and Commissioner Stephen Shaw joined the visit with state Sen. Anthony Bucco and Assemblywoman Aura Dunn. Among the local officials were Hanover Mayor John L. Ferramosca and Committeeman Ronald Francioli, Florham Park Mayor Mark Taylor and Washington Township Mayor Matt Murello. Representing the Morris County Chamber of Commerce were Vice President Michael Stanzilis, who is also Mount Arlington’s mayor, and Craig Schlosser, Vice President of the Morris County Economic Development Corporation.

“Morris County has always been supportive of the businesses, both small and large, that keep our local economy vibrant. We work to keep communicating with our business community to understand the challenges they face in this volatile economy and how we may help,” said Director Selen.

“Today, we renewed our acquaintance with Suburban Propane, a national distributor and marketer of energy products that has been operating in the region for almost a century and is headquartered right in our backyard in Whippany. Commissioner Stephen Shaw and Deputy Director John Krickus toured the facility with me today, and we were intrigued by how Suburban is employing new technologies with its energy resources, and we were impressed to see the company continuing its charitable and community outreach efforts,” Selen added.

The tour included an inspection and demonstration of Suburban’s “Bobtails,” the easily recognized vehicles by which the company safely distributes its propane.

For more information about Suburban Propane, and their ongoing commitment to community service in New Jersey and around the nation, please visit https://www.suburbanpropane.com/

Historic Morris Canal Restoration to be Dedicated in Wharton Aug. 20

Ribbon-Cutting to Mark Completion of 16-Year Preservation MissionWith some fanfare and a ribbon cutting, Wharton Borough will officially complete a 16-year mission to restore one of the most remarkably preserved and unique sections of the famous Morris Canal – and of course, the festivities will be held at the 47th Annual “Canal Day Music & Craft Festival” in Wharton Borough on Aug. 20.The site at Wharton’s Hugh Force Canal Park is one of the rema...

Ribbon-Cutting to Mark Completion of 16-Year Preservation Mission

With some fanfare and a ribbon cutting, Wharton Borough will officially complete a 16-year mission to restore one of the most remarkably preserved and unique sections of the famous Morris Canal – and of course, the festivities will be held at the 47th Annual “Canal Day Music & Craft Festival” in Wharton Borough on Aug. 20.

The site at Wharton’s Hugh Force Canal Park is one of the remaining and best-preserved watered sections of the historic Morris Canal, which was responsible for the economic development of not only the Borough but the entire region 175 years ago. The restoration project, developed with $4.7 million in state and county grants, involves a quarter-mile stretch of the old 102-mile long canal that once linked Phillipsburg and Jersey City.

A lock, by which boats were once elevated or lowered during their journey through sections of the uniquely engineered canal, is being fully restored, along with an adjacent, stone “lock tender’s” house that will become a new museum.

Join the Ribbon Cutting & Fun on August 20, 10:00 a.m.

Hugh Force Canal Park, 180 West Central Ave., Wharton, NJ 07885

The Music & Craft Festival Runs 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“The Morris Canal Lock 2 East restoration project was sixteen years in the making. The plan was to make Wharton Borough a destination utilizing remnants from its past glory, and just as this 19th Century waterway was revolutionary with its engineering achievements, the canal site today will produce economic vitality for the Borough nearly 200 years later,” said John Manna, President of the Canal Day Association and project coordinator for Wharton.

“This project focused federal, state, and municipal governments to this end, and we hope to have busloads of school children visit daily to learn about this legacy. You know it's not every day that a piece of history is brought back to life from the past,” Manna added.

“You know it's not every day that a piece of history is brought back to life from the past,” John Manna, President of the Canal Day Association.

It was a multi-year, multi-phase plan funded by the New Jersey Department of Transportation (over $4 million) the Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund

(over $658,000) and the New Jersey Historic Trust (over $88,000). Also key to its success were the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority, the Morris County Board of County Commissioners, the Morris County Park Commission, Wharton Borough’s mayors and council members over two decades, and the Canal Society of New Jersey.

“This is absolutely unique. Wharton now has a beautifully restored, quarter-mile segment of the historic Morris Canal, as well as the only operational canal lock on what remains of the entire 102-miles of the old canal. The project also restored one of the few remaining lock-tender houses on the canal. Due to the diligence and hard work of everyone involved from the start, this project is a major success,” said Morris County Commissioner Stephen Shaw, liaison to the county’s Office of Planning and Preservation.

“Wharton wanted this project for many years because it would make Wharton a destination point. Every town council over the years supported the restoration. The Morris Canal created Wharton’s early economy. It built the economy of the entire area. This is about our history, and with the help of so many, we have finally restored a stretch of the canal that includes a working lock, the tender house, a quarter mile of the canal and we even have the pond where boats would float and wait to go through the lock,” said Wharton Mayor William Chegwidden, who also is a high school history teacher.

The Mayor also credited John Manna with initiating the project and spearheading efforts over the past 20 years to get it completed.

Hugh Force Canal Park is also part of the Morris County Park Commission’s West Morris Greenway, a trail system that remains under development and in planning

stages, but eventually will extend into Jefferson Township. Because of its historical significance and unique features, the canal restoration at Hugh Force Canal Park is expected to become an attraction for educational programs, school visits and tourists.

The lock, also historically known as Bird’s Lock, had been buried long ago when the development of railroads prompted the state to abandon the Morris Canal in 1924. No one was certain what remained of the lock, as so many other locks, prisms and inclines along the 102-mile stretch had been destroyed, repurposed or left to decay over the past century. However, the project revealed not only that the stone walls remained remarkably intact, but the original Mitre gate doors also were found buried at the site so that it was possible to reconstruct exact replicas of the originals, which will be placed on display.

Explore the Canal Day Website for More Information

Project History, Cost and Funding Sources

2006 - NJ Historic Trust and Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund provided grant funding of $87,000. The funds were utilized to create an historic site master plan and feasibility study. Funds were also utilized for determining the condition of the buried lock in which 64 shovel tests and large trenches were made, during which 731 artifacts were retrieved.

2007 - Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund provided a grant of $100,000 to assist with professional services towards the restoration of the lock. The funds were utilized to acquire DEP permitting and approvals.

2008 - NJ Historic Trust granted an award of $50,000 for the preparation of restoration documents for the lock, canal basin, and lock tender’s house. This work included site analysis, environmental permitting, and schematic design, as well as archaeological monitoring.

2010 - The project received Department of Environmental Protection permitting approvals to begin work.

2010 – N.J. Department of Transportation provided a grant totaling $582,000 to excavate Lock 2E and restore the stone walls to grade level.

2011 - Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund provided a construction grant of

$286,450 for the fabrication of wood lock gates, control mechanism, and funding for the construction of the lock walls to their historic elevation.

2015 - Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund provided funding of $117,995 for Mitre Gates.

2016 - Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund provided $27,852 for construction documents.

2017 - Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund provided a grant of $38,790 for design and contract administration for the lock tender’s house construction.

2018 - Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund provided a grant of $38,250 for design and contract administration for the lock construction.

2019 - New Jersey Department of Transportation provided funding of $3,424,800 through their Transportation Alternative Grant Program

PHOTOS

Top Right: Bird's Lock and the "lock tender's" house on the Morris Canal in Wharton as it appears today, with restoration work about finished.

Top Left: The same view of Bird's Lock and the "lock tender's" house on the Morris Canal circa 1900.

Center Right: Bird's Lock and the "lock tender's" house on the Morris Canal today, looking east over the lock.

Center Left: The same eastward view of Bird's Lock, which had remained buried prior to restoration work beginning, and the "lock tender's" house in ruins prior to its restoration.

Center Right: A 1904 photograph of Bird's Lock in action, 20 years before the Morris Canal was decommissioned by the State of New Jersey.

Morris County Appoints Deena Leary Acting Administrator

Veteran Morris County Employee Assuming the Helm of Morris CountyAssistant Morris County Administrator Deena Leary has been appointed Acting Administrator by the Morris County Board of County Commissioners, placing her at the helm of county operations and ready to assume the post when long-time Administrator John Bonanni officially retires at year’s end.Ms. Leary, who lives in Harding, began her career with Morris County as an intern in 1995 with the Division of Transportation Ma...

Veteran Morris County Employee Assuming the Helm of Morris County

Assistant Morris County Administrator Deena Leary has been appointed Acting Administrator by the Morris County Board of County Commissioners, placing her at the helm of county operations and ready to assume the post when long-time Administrator John Bonanni officially retires at year’s end.

Ms. Leary, who lives in Harding, began her career with Morris County as an intern in 1995 with the Division of Transportation Management. She worked through the ranks to become Director of Planning & Development in 2011, and was promoted in 2013 to lead a new combined department of Planning & Public Works before being appointed Assistant Morris County Administrator in August 2017.

“I know I speak for the entire board when I say there is no one else more suitable than Deena Leary to step in as our administrator. She literally has worked her way to the top, understanding first-hand the inner workings of our county government for almost 30 years. While John Bonanni will be sorely missed, Morris County could not be left in better hands when he leaves in the New Year,” said Commissioner Director Tayfun Selen.

The appointment, recommended by Mr. Bonanni, was made at last week’s Board of Commissioners meeting, where Commissioner Deborah Smith noted Ms. Leary had served as acting administrator recently when Mr. Bonanni was on medical leave.

She did a phenomenal job. The beat kept going, and it was a smooth transition,” said Commissioner Smith. “I just want to commend her on her excellent work ethic and I know she will be an excellent leader for the county -- and I also point out, as a diversity factor, she is the first female administrator in Morris County. I think that is terrific also.”

Bonanni, who plans to retire after the New Year, commended the board for Ms. Leary’s appointment.

“I want to congratulate Deena, but equally important, I want to thank this governing body for not making positions around here political, but functional - and Deena is a perfect example of that. This governing body looks at the qualifications of people, and I thank you for that,” said Bonanni.

Commissioner Douglas Cabana, who joined the board in 1997 and remains the longest serving Commissioner still on the board, cited Ms. Leary’s many years in leadership roles within county government.

“I’ve known Deena for many years, and she has the respect of local officials everywhere. She is usually found working well past the time most others have gone home for the day trying to solve problems and get things done for the residents of Morris County. She has been a go-to person for many of our local officials and is always deeply involved in developing our biggest projects, most recently our COVID-19 response and our Small Business Grant Program. We are fortunate to have her with us and willing to step into this key position,” said Commissioner Cabana.

Ms. Leary earned a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Rutgers University in 2018. Her undergraduate degree from Susquehanna University is in Environmental Science and Economics.

She became certified through the American Institute of Certified Planners in 2008 and has been a licensed Professional Planner in New Jersey since 2009.

Ms. Leary grew up and spent most of her life in Jefferson Township and became a Harding Township resident in 2018.

Morris County Laments the Loss of Stephen W. Hammond

Morris County issued its condolences to the family of Stephen W. Hammond, who served as Morris County’s Director of Public Works and County Engineer from 2005 through 2013, after serving as Assistant Morris County Engineer from 1998.The county learned of his passing yesterday, July 26, 2022.“Steve was a long-time valued member of the Morris County family. His career was focused on public service to the residents of Morris County. Whenever you called Steve, he would resolve t...

Morris County issued its condolences to the family of Stephen W. Hammond, who served as Morris County’s Director of Public Works and County Engineer from 2005 through 2013, after serving as Assistant Morris County Engineer from 1998.

The county learned of his passing yesterday, July 26, 2022.

“Steve was a long-time valued member of the Morris County family. His career was focused on public service to the residents of Morris County. Whenever you called Steve, he would resolve the issue quickly and professionally. His retirement left big shoes to fill and he has been missed by his friends and staff at Morris County. My thoughts and prayers are with his family,” said Commissioner Douglas Cabana, who has served on the board since 1997.

Mr. Hammond began his service with Morris County in 1970 as Assistant Engineer with what was then called the Morris County Engineering Department, becoming Senior Engineer in 1974, Principal Engineer in 1976 and Supervising Engineer by 1991.

Frank Druetzler, who had served for 15 years on the Morris County Board of Chosen Freeholders before they became Commissioners in 2021, remembered Steve as an “engineer's engineer” who always demanded quality work.

“His mind was filled with visionary ideas. He was a friendly person with a sharp wit who was a joy to know,” Druetzler added.

Mr. Hammond oversaw many major projects for Morris County, including the development of the sprawling grounds of the former Greystone State Park Psychiatric Hospital in Parsippany-Troy Hills Township into Morris County’s Central Park, guiding the construction of the Central Park sports fields during his last several years in office.

Under his watch, Morris County also completely renovated and expanded the Morris County Library in 2000, and Mr. Hammond was involved in completing several other significant projects at county complexes on West Hanover Avenue in Morris and Parsippany townships, as well as at Central Park. Among them were the expansion of the Morris County Public Safety and Training Academy, construction of the Department of Human Services Building, development of the new Morris View Nursing Home and upgrading facilities for Health Management Services.

Mr. Hammond additionally supervised the $15 million replacement of the Route 202 Reservoir Bridge, which spans the narrow north end of the Jersey City Reservoir to connect Parsippany Road in Parsippany to Washington Street in Boonton. The project, which was finished in 2005, included preserving as a walking path the original, historic Pratt truss style span that was built in 1895 and remains on the National Register of Historic Places.

Mr. Hammond held a Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, where he graduated in 1975 after majoring in traffic and transportation. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1969.

He was a Fellow in the Institute of Transportation Engineers as well as a founding member and past president of the County and Municipal Traffic Engineers Association

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Global Life Rejuvenation is Here to Help You Get Your Old Life Back.

Want to feel younger, want to decrease the feeling of your age. Give us a call at 866-793-9933 to chat with us, or contact us via the form below. We’re here to help in any possible way.


booking image new

Call Us

Call 866.793.9933 for a hormone
replacement consultation or email us!

Google 973.587.8638

Facebook 973.587.8879

Email

[email protected]

Service Areas

Copyright Global Life Rejuvenation. All rights reserved.