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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

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Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Somerset, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Somerset, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Somerset, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Somerset, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Somerset, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Somerset, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Somerset, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Somerset, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Somerset, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Somerset, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Somerset, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Somerset, NJ

As student depression and anxiety soars, N.J. lawmakers demand more from schools

With suicide the second most common cause of death among college students, state lawmakers just voted for bills that would require more faculty and staff to be trained to recognize signs of mental illness, and would make more funding available to expand treatment services on campus.In a busy voting session Thursday at the Statehouse in Trenton, the state Assembly also passed a bill that would focus more attention on troubled students in high school and middle school, by allowing school counselors to refer them to private counselors....

With suicide the second most common cause of death among college students, state lawmakers just voted for bills that would require more faculty and staff to be trained to recognize signs of mental illness, and would make more funding available to expand treatment services on campus.

In a busy voting session Thursday at the Statehouse in Trenton, the state Assembly also passed a bill that would focus more attention on troubled students in high school and middle school, by allowing school counselors to refer them to private counselors.

Pandemic-related isolation and upheaval has exacerbated mental health problems among young people that had already been on the rise. A survey of 3,200 students by Active Minds, a national nonprofit said 20% of college students and 12% of high school students reported their mental health had “significantly worsened” in 2020.

A 2021 study said suicide — the second-most common cause of death among college students — appears to be a growing threat in the COVID era. The authors concluded college students hospitalized for COVID “should be screened for suicidal thoughts and behaviors subsequent to discharge, particularly if they have pre-existing suicidal ideation.”

By a 74-0 vote with four abstentions, the state Assembly approved the “College Mental Health Services Act,” which would create a fund of public and private dollars that public colleges can apply for to expand treatment and public education efforts on campus.

“Supporting New Jersey’s college students means doing more than just putting them on the path to academic success,” said Assemblywoman Sadaf Jaffer, D-Somerset, a prime sponsor of the bill.

“The College Mental Health Services Grant Program will improve access to potentially life-saving resources by eliminating barriers that stand in the way of students seeking treatment. Mental health concerns deserve the same level of urgency as any other illness or condition, and we cannot let staffing shortages or long waits prevent students from getting help when they need it.”

Assemblyman Gerry Scharfenberger, R-Monmouth, was one of the four abstentions, explaining he did not support a provision in the bill (A3713) that required colleges to post on their websites the ratio of students who seek mental health services to mental health professionals at the institution, and the types of treatment services provided.

He said he worried the disclosure would put the college in a bad light. “Will that sway people,” Scharfenberger asked, if one college has far more students seeking treatment? He said he “doesn’t see the value of posting numbers.”

By a vote of 76-0, the Assembly also approved a bill (A1176) that requires all colleges in the state to implement suicide prevention programs and raise awareness of the mental health services available.

Colleges and universities would have to conduct a public awareness campaign about depression and suicide and reducing the stigma around seeking treatment, annually train resident assistants who work in college dorms on how to recognize the warning signs of depression and suicide and to respond to students experiencing a crisis, and post crisis hotline numbers in each dorm, library and student center.

The Assembly also approved legislation that would allow school counselors to refer students for mental health treatment.

The bill (A4086) passed by a vote of 78-0. But some testified against the bill at an Assembly Education Committee hearing on June 9, saying it threatened to interfere with parental autonomy.

“We’re not for the government getting involved with our relationship with our children,” said a parent who testified at the hearing remotely. “It seems schools and the government are getting involved in the parent-child relationship too much. Parents can find counselors for their children.”

Assemblywoman Pamela Lampitt, D-Camden, the committee chairwoman and the bill’s prime sponsor, said the intent is to help parents, “who are busy and sometimes don’t have the wherewithal to find a professional to use, somebody outside the system.” Parents would be notified should a school psychologist or counselor make a referral, according to the bill.

“This bill is (intended) to provide information to families who have the option to find professionals outside school and get immediate care if they want it,” Lampitt said.

Peg Kinsell, policy director at SPAN, the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network, testified at the hearing that she has seen mental health needs escalate over the last two years. Call volume has increased “30-fold,” and “a 15-minute call now takes an hour for families because of the many layers of the problems now.”

Kinsell expressed concern about the lack of professionals available, and how the shortage may contribute to a prolonged absence if a child is temporarily sent home for mental health reasons.

“Nobody is collecting data on how many kids are out of school on this, there’s no accountability about days missed, and we’re really concerned about it,” Kinsell said.

“Saving Charlie,” a special report published by NJ Advance Media on March 6 about a suicidal teenager in Central Jersey and his family’s struggles to find help, highlighted the barriers to treatment, including waiting lists and teens languishing in emergency rooms. The Senate Education Committee held a hearing soon after, in March to discuss how the pediatric behavioral health system is “overburdened” and “in crisis.”

The three bills the Assembly approved Thursday have yet to be acted on by the Senate.

If you are in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text TALK to 74174.

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Somerville: Juneteenth Event Reconciles History with Today's Realities

Olivia Y. Altidor of Hillsborough performs a reading of her original poem, "A Letter to My Future Self" at Thursday's Juneteenth celebration in Somerville.SOMERVILLE, NJ - Lessons in history were delivered by performers and lawmakers during Thursday's commemoration of Juneteenth hosted by the Somerset Cultural and Heritage Commission on the steps of the historic Somerset County Courthouse.The theme of Thursday's event was"Acknowledging the Past with an Eye Towards Our Shared Future."J...

Olivia Y. Altidor of Hillsborough performs a reading of her original poem, "A Letter to My Future Self" at Thursday's Juneteenth celebration in Somerville.

SOMERVILLE, NJ - Lessons in history were delivered by performers and lawmakers during Thursday's commemoration of Juneteenth hosted by the Somerset Cultural and Heritage Commission on the steps of the historic Somerset County Courthouse.

The theme of Thursday's event was"Acknowledging the Past with an Eye Towards Our Shared Future."

Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when Union General Gordon Granger rode to Galveston, Texas and informed enslaved people of their freedom as guaranteed by the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation.

Live performances featured an eclectic blend of poetry, jazz, spirituals, and contemporary music, including international soprano Dr. Sonya Headlam of Princeton who performed “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” and the Jonathan Ware Quartet premiering selections from “Talking Suite.”

Additional entertainment included poetry readings by Hillsborough student Olivia Altidor and Ssanyu Lukoma, and the premiere of an original Juneteenth dramatic skit, titled “To Be Free,” written by playwright Ryan Kilpatrick and performed by students of the Allegra School of Music and Arts in Hillsborough.

A performance by Alexander Simone and Whodat? followed the Juneteenth event on Division Street. Simone is the grandson of legendary Nina Simone.

Somerville Mayor Dennis Sullivan offered a welcome to the gathering seated on the courthouse lawn. Shanel Robinson, director of the Somerset County Commissioners, offered her reflections on the significance of Juneteenth.

"Juneteenth, of course, celebrates of the end of slavery in America more than 150 years ago," Robinson said. "But more than that, it provides an opportunity to reassess our deeply imperfect history, and to move forward, together."

Gov. Phil Murphy signed legislation in 2020 declaring Juneteenth a state and public holiday. President Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act on June 17, 2021 – the same day that Somerset County held its inaugural Juneteenth celebration.

New Jersey Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-12th) was to have been the keynote speaker, but had to cancel after she tested positive for COVID-19.

"Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman has distinguished herself as a truth-teller about American history and the central role played by African-Americans over the last four centuries,” Robinson said.

In April, Watson Coleman sponsored the National Liberty Memorial Preservation Act that would recognize the role of African American and Indigenous troops who helped win the American Revolution with a monument near the Washington Mall. The legislation passed the House of Representatives and is awaiting a vote in the U.S. Senate.Immediately after the Juneteenth celebration.

Robinson's reflections offered at the opening of Thursday's program follow:

"Welcome, everyone, to Somerset County’s 2nd annual Juneteenth celebration. I am Shanel Robinson, Commissioner Director of Somerset County. That means I am the most senior elected official of our county of 345,000 people, and the first African American to hold this position.

"As we stood on these steps of this historic courthouse one year ago, President Joe Biden’s signature literally was still wet on Federal legislation to create this important national holiday.

"Juneteenth, of course, celebrates of the end of slavery in America more than 150 years ago. But more than that, it provides an opportunity to reassess our deeply imperfect history, and to move forward, together.

"The reminders of our imperfect history are all around us.

"A half mile south of here is the Somerville New Cemetery, where close to a dozen veterans of the Union Army’s Colored Troops are buried, heroes who helped bring an end to the enslavement of African Americans and save our union. Their sacrifices made today’s celebration possible.

"A half-mile west of here is the Wallace House, where George Washington made his Revolutionary War headquarters in 1779. His host family, the Wallaces, owned enslaved African Americans who worked in that home before and after Washington’s stay.

"These are stories that have too often been left out of the larger story of American history, but they are fundamental to that history.

"George Washington’s Continental Army was approximately 25% non-white by the time they marched through Somerset County in 1781 on their way to victory in Yorktown, Virginia. That story, along with the story of Juneteenth, are important for us to teach in our schools.

"Our program today will include a diversity of talent, including many young people who are learning about our past as they prepare to build our future. I’d like to thank our Somerset County Cultural & Heritage Commission, and particularly Vice President Donnetta Johnson, for creating today’s event. During this event, you’ll have a chance to meet many of Somerset County’s elected leaders and hear their testimony to the importance of building a more inclusive, equal, and free nation.

"That is the spirit of our first song, “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” a traditional African American hymn that has become a Black National Anthem. As a woman of Faith, it is a deeply meaningful song to me that I have sung hundreds of times. It will be performed today by Dr. Sonya Headlam who encourages us to join her. You’ll find the lyrics on the back of your program."

Sullivan's remarks follow:

"Welcome to Somerville as we gather in fellowship to celebrate Juneteenth 2022. One hundred and fifty-seven years ago news of President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation finally reached the enslaved people of Texas, exactly nine hundred days since that watershed document had been signed.

"For over eighty years, the promises set forth in the Declaration of Independence,the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights officially excluded millions of Americans held in bondage. Too many unofficial obstacles to true equality remain to this day.

"The Emancipation Proclamation redefined the ongoing conflict from a war for union into a war for freedom, setting in motion a drive for equality and civil rights that continues even today.

"Let us reflect on the progress that has been made and rededicate ourselves to the hard work yet to come. From Washington, DC to Galveston, TX to Somerville, NJ may our voices be heard as we trumpet freedom to those whose future we ensure today."

Christiana Nwachuku claims 100 dash title at the Meet of Champions, 2022

As Christiana Nwachuku approached the starting blocks for the 100-meter dash at the Meet of Champions on Saturday afternoon, she kept repeating a message to herself.Get out fast, but run faster to the finish.Nwachuku, among the contenders in the event at Franklin, didn’t have a great start in the trials earlier in the day and entered the finals win the second-fastest time behind Montclair’s Kiya Lawson.The finals, however, were a different story. Nwachuku started out fast and led wire-to-wire, finishing in 11...

As Christiana Nwachuku approached the starting blocks for the 100-meter dash at the Meet of Champions on Saturday afternoon, she kept repeating a message to herself.

Get out fast, but run faster to the finish.

Nwachuku, among the contenders in the event at Franklin, didn’t have a great start in the trials earlier in the day and entered the finals win the second-fastest time behind Montclair’s Kiya Lawson.

The finals, however, were a different story. Nwachuku started out fast and led wire-to-wire, finishing in 11.93 to claim the title. She was the only runner to break 12 seconds and she clipped considerable time off her trials performance (12.08).

“It’s really nice,” Nwachuku, a University of Pennsylvania recruit, said. “I wanted to add the 100 Meet of Champs win to my collection. It feels really good.”

Nwachuku ran slightly faster last week at the Non-Public A meet, clocking a personal record of 11.7, but she navigated chilly temperatures and circling wind to win gold on Saturday in the final meet of the year.

“I was literally just screaming at myself to get out fast, but run faster,” she said. “That was my little mantra on the line. And it worked.”

Lawson, who ran 12.06 in the prelims to earn the top time, closed hard on Nwachuku and finished second in 12.00. It wasn’t until she crossed the finish line that Nwachuku saw just how close she was.

“I actually didn’t (realize how close she was) until I crossed the line and it was like, ‘Oh my god, you’re really close.’ That was nice. She’s an amazing person.

“I think I’ve run against her once or twice before, so she was kind of familiar competition. I knew I needed to, not necessarily get out fast, but keep going fast. She speed up at the end. I was nerve-wracked but I was able to pull through.”

100-METER DASH FINALS

1-Christiana Nwachuku, Kent Place, 11.93

2-Kiya Lawson, Montclair, 12.00

3-Gianna Mangili, Mount St. Dominic, 12.04

4-Sanai Bryant, Dumont, 12.33

5-Nyla Felton, North Plainfield, 12.36

6-Naylah Jones, Timber Creek, 12.46

7-Oluwatamilore Adedeji, DePaul, 32.65

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After coming up just short, PH’s Zuckerman wins gold in boys pole vault at 2022 Meet of Champions

After clearing the bar and securing the gold medal at the Meet of Champions on Saturday, Max Zuckerman turned to his coach and screamed:“It was taken from me too many times!”After the 2020 MOC was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic followed by a second-place finish last year, Zuckerman had finally made it to the top.The Pascack Hills senior cleared 15 feet, 6 inches to secure a gold medal in pole vault at the 2022 Track and Field Meet of Champions at Franklin High School, securing his place atop the pod...

After clearing the bar and securing the gold medal at the Meet of Champions on Saturday, Max Zuckerman turned to his coach and screamed:

“It was taken from me too many times!”

After the 2020 MOC was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic followed by a second-place finish last year, Zuckerman had finally made it to the top.

The Pascack Hills senior cleared 15 feet, 6 inches to secure a gold medal in pole vault at the 2022 Track and Field Meet of Champions at Franklin High School, securing his place atop the podium and adding his name to the history books.

“I had worked too hard not to make that jump,” said Zuckerman on his mindset after winning the gold. “I just remembered the times that I was beaten, and I pushed myself a little bit harder this time.”

“There’s always been somebody before him,” said Pascack Hills head coach Ross Koehler on his standout senior earning the gold after years of competing at a high level. “Now, it’s his time to shine, and he came through.”

After clearing 15-6 to edge out Hillsborough senior Kevin Sullivan for the gold, the bar was lifted a full six inches to 16 feet even.

Zuckerman, looking much more relaxed than he did on his first-place-winning vault, cleared the bar in his first attempt, setting a new personal record, as well as a new county record and school record to cap his career at the high-school level in impressive fashion.

Prior to his state-title winning vault, Zuckerman was shifting the weight back and forth on his feet, closing his eyes and speaking quietly to himself -- clearly attempting to get into the zone.

“That’s usually how I focus myself up,” said Zuckerman on his immense level of focus at the time. “Take some deep breaths, say a few words to myself... I just close my eyes and try to envision myself going over the bar.”

When going for 16′, the senior appeared much more comfortable, maintaining the demeanor of a vaulter perhaps in training, not one that was going for a trio of records at the MOC.

“As soon as I hit 16, the pressure kind of went away,” said Zuckerman on looking much more relaxed prior to attempting his PR. “I kind of just moved on. I didn’t even realize we went to 16, I just jumped as if it was the same bar. I didn’t change much, I just kind of relaxed, and I think that helped me clear it on the first attempt.”

Despite the fact that the boys vaulters were going into a significant and steady wind, the Northeastern commit went for a new state record, bumping the bar up to 16 feet, 5 inches but ultimately unable to clear it.

The state record was set last season by East Brunswick’s Brian McSweeney, who cleared 16-4.75 to break a record that had stood since 1980, when Will Nesbitt of Millburn cleared 16-4.

BOYS POLE VAULT RESULTS

1-Max Zuckerman, Pascack Hills, 16-0

2-Kevin O’Sullivan, Hillsborough, 15-0

3-Matthew Aono, Ridgewood, 14-0

4-Brian O’Sullivan, Hillsborough, 14-0

5-Luke Gnospelius, Ridgewood, 14-0

6-Tyler Raimondi, Toms River South, 13-6

7-Damiam Scouloukas, Hunterdon Central, 13-6

8-Robert George, Montville, 13-0

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Gas prices near record highs (again). See costs in every N.J. county.

Gas prices are once again nearing record highs just in time for the busy travel weekend for the Memorial Day holiday.The average price for a regular gallon of gas in New Jersey is $4.761, according to AAA. That’s fractions of a penny lower than the $4.766 record set on May 20.Don’t expect prices to ease up this summer, experts told NJ Advance Media. It’s not a question of if, but of when, New Jersey will see average gas prices ...

Gas prices are once again nearing record highs just in time for the busy travel weekend for the Memorial Day holiday.

The average price for a regular gallon of gas in New Jersey is $4.761, according to AAA. That’s fractions of a penny lower than the $4.766 record set on May 20.

Don’t expect prices to ease up this summer, experts told NJ Advance Media. It’s not a question of if, but of when, New Jersey will see average gas prices top $5 a gallon.

Gas is most expensive in Somerset County, where a gallon of regular will run you $4.856, and cheapest in Sussex County at $4.672.

Those prices are up from earlier this month. On average, gas is about 28 cents a gallon pricier than on May 9, according to AAA’s figures.

New Jersey also saw one of the highest singe-week jumps in price - 16 cents - this week compared to other states, AAA said.

Despite rising prices, demand is also increasing, AAA said. Demand typically increases during the summer months, when more families are traveling.

The rise in gas prices is also attributed to the cost of crude oil, which spiked when Russia invaded Ukraine in February.

“Gasoline is $1.05 more than it was on February 24, when Russia invaded Ukraine,” Andrew Gross, a AAA spokesperson, said in a statement. “That sent shock waves through the oil market that have kept oil costs elevated.”

Apps like GasBuddy can help you find the best prices near you, while apps like TollGuru and MapQuest can help you calculate just how costly that drive is going to be. And there are ways to keep your gas costs down, like taking fewer trips and making sure your tires have enough air.

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Katie Kausch may be reached at [email protected]. Tell us your coronavirus story or send a tip here.

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