HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in River Edge, NJ

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HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women River Edge, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in River Edge, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT River Edge, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments River Edge, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement River Edge, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy River Edge, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men River Edge, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin River Edge, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT River Edge, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement River Edge, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy River Edge, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in River Edge, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in River Edge, NJ

A $7.9M upgrade is coming to N.J.’s Great Falls National Park

Paterson Mayor Andre Sayegh on Monday unveiled plans to a new Passaic River walkway that will expand the Paterson Great Falls National Park and allow visitors a closer look at the relics of America’s first planned industrial center.The $7.9 million walkway will wind down along the banks just below the falls, where the first water-powered mills sprung up in the late 18th Century to fulfill Alexander Hamilton’s vision of America that would produ...

Paterson Mayor Andre Sayegh on Monday unveiled plans to a new Passaic River walkway that will expand the Paterson Great Falls National Park and allow visitors a closer look at the relics of America’s first planned industrial center.

The $7.9 million walkway will wind down along the banks just below the falls, where the first water-powered mills sprung up in the late 18th Century to fulfill Alexander Hamilton’s vision of America that would produce its own goods, instead of having to rely on Britain.

When it opens in 2024, the walkway will bring visitors within photo-click distance of the ruins of some of those mills, which over generations produced wood, guns, locomotives, textiles, and laid the groundwork for the American Labor Movement.

“I want visitors to say that Paterson is the birthplace of the American Dream,” Sayegh said at a news conference at City Hall. “Immigration, innovation, industrialization. That’s the American Dream.”

Rep. Bill J. Pascrell Jr., D-9th District, a former mayor of Paterson, said the Great Falls represents not just the power of nature, but the power of workers to organize.

“This was the birthplace of the labor movement,” Pascrell said. “It’s where our fathers, our uncles worked there. This is our history.”

The project is scheduled to break ground next month and is being funded through a mix of federal, state, and local sources: $1.85 million from the National Park Service, $1.5 million in COVID relief funds from the state; $1.3 million from the Passaic County Open Space trust fund, and $2.8 million in city funds, officials said.

When it is complete, the walkway will cover about 2.5 acres and take visitors deeper into the park to what is commonly known as the ATP property. That site, which has been fenced off for decades, contains the ruins of the mill where the Colt .45 pistol was manufactured.

The Great Falls has long been Paterson’s greatest asset, and the Sayegh administration is hoping to capitalize on Paterson’s history with an ambitious redevelopment plan centered around the national park. At the edge of park, the city has committed $94 million to the redevelopment of Hinchliffe Stadium, one of the few arenas still standing where Negro League baseball was played.

“What we’re trying to do is harness the power of the Great Falls once again,” Sayegh said.

Renovation of the stadium is well underway, with plans for a restaurant, exhibition spaces, and senior housing with a parking deck next door. The hope is that when the project is finished next year, Hinchliffe will regain its place as the city’s sports palace—and attract private investment to the area.

Although the Paterson Great Falls National Park attracts hundreds of visitors a day, one of its major features has been closed to the public for almost a year. Last August, the park inspected a footbridge over the chasm of the Great Falls and declared it unsafe.

Not only did the footbridge offer a dramatic view from 77-foot chasm to the river below, it connected one side of the park to the other. Once it was closed, visitors had to take the long way around the park to the observation decks to see the falls up close.

The closure touched off a dispute between the National Park Service and the Passaic Valley Water Commission over who should pay to fix the footbridge. Ed Smyk, the Passaic County historian, said he sifted through the records and determined that the Passaic County Water Commission built the current footbridge in 1984 and is therefore responsible for its upkeep. Smyk said he shared his research in a letter to the mayor, Sayegh.

Darren Boch, the park superintendent, said it is estimated that the footbridge would cost $600,000 to fix. He said the National Park Service was willing to put up a grant for $300,000, but the Passaic Valley Water Commission so far hasn’t committed anything to the project. Boch met with Sayegh after the press conference on Monday to discuss funding the footbridge repair.

“We don’t want to spend more time rankling over who owns it,” Boch said.

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River Edge drops $3M plan to give softball team spot to play at Veteran's Memorial Park

RIVER EDGE — The Borough Council decided not to move forward with a $3 million conceptual plan to renovate Veteran’s Memorial Park and add a girls' softball field and will instead hold meetings with stakeholders around town to find a spot for the team to play.At the Monday night meeting, the ...

RIVER EDGE — The Borough Council decided not to move forward with a $3 million conceptual plan to renovate Veteran’s Memorial Park and add a girls' softball field and will instead hold meetings with stakeholders around town to find a spot for the team to play.

At the Monday night meeting, the borough council discussed three different options for the revitalization of Veteran’s Memorial Park. However, during a lengthy public comment period with community members both for and against building a field in Veterans Memorial Park, a fourth plan was proposed: transform a Little League Field into a softball field that the River Edge Girls Athletic League (REGAL) could play on.

The council did not move ahead with any of those options and instead voted to ask the recreation commission to hold a meeting with stakeholders in the community to try and find a field in the borough for the girls to play on.

The council needed to decide on a tentative plan Monday because some plans would require grants andthe county was reviewing Open Space Trust Fund grant applications later this month. The council previously applied for a grant to improve playground equipment at Brookside Park.

At the meeting, residents passionately stated their cases about whether building a new softball field in Veterans Memorial Park would be right or wrong for the community, but all agreed the girls needed a proper field to play on.

Beth Chinigò, president of the REGAL, said their group has been fighting for equal representation from the municipality since its inception in 1965. REGAL is a youth athletic program in the borough for girls up to 8th grade that offers basketball, softball, runners, volleyball, and cheerleading.

She said the field needs to be on municipal land and "any less would be unfair to the little girls in this town."

Currently, said Chinigò, the group needs to jump through hoops to do anything, even to hang a single banner at the Roosevelt Elementary school field they play on, which she said also has "subpar drainage" and no shading. It took four months of conversation between the recreation department, board of education and an appearance at a school board to get permission to hang the banner, said Chinigò.

"That’s not good faith," said Chinigò. "It’s shameful that the council would consider not applying for grant money to provide any less than a full-time municipal field for the girls. It’s unfair to these little girls."

Anna Delia, vice-chair of the recreation commission, read a statement that said the commission hadn’t been consulted about the Veterans Memorial Park girls’ softball field proposal before hearing about it online. She said the commission was "disheartened" that they weren’t part of the discussion. The majority of the commission is in support of finding a realistic option for the REGAL teams, but didn’t support Veteran’s Memorial Park as a home for this field. She said applying for a grant did not seem like a viable option without a specific plan.

"Memorial Park is a space for all residents to use on a daily basis and simply taking down most of it to add a field would not be what’s best for our residents," said Delia.

Resident René Muñoz said while he agrees the girls do need a field somewhere in town, his biggest objection to the proposal was that it was "rushed, poorly communicated and not shared with the residents." He preferred that the council skip the grant season and have more in-depth conversations with the board of education.

Abigail Bartelloni, a high school softball player who played in REGAL in the past, said she remembers the inequality her team experienced when she was younger, saying she has scars on her legs from the field and that the softball team didn’t have a snack stand or a fence like the boys."I want my sister and the future generation of girls to have something that I didn’t have," said Bartelloni.

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Resident Vince Sicari encouraged the council to have discussions with Little League about sharing their field with the girls.

"We're not going to teach a lesson to our young boys if we don't show them that they have to share the two fields that we have," said Sicari.

Resident Jim Serednicky said the idea of "gutting Memorial Park to include a single-use facility runs counter to what our space has been about traditionally." He agreed the girls needed space, but not enough research has been done about the facilities the borough currently has.

Here are the other options the council reviewed Monday:

Dario Chinigo, a councilmember who was passionately in favor of building a new space for the softball team at Veteran's Memorial Park, said Monday he felt the entire council "failed" the little girls in the community.

"I don't believe anything is going to happen in the future, although I will sit with bated breath waiting for it to happen," said Chinigo.

Councilwoman Lissa Montisano-Koen said she hopes the community will continue to rally about this issue going forward and "hold the board of education accountable."

Mayor Thomas Papaleo said he wants something done next year, whether that's allocating space for the girls from one of the Little League fields or formalizing an agreement from the board of education.

"It has to happen next year and it can't be put off anymore," said Papaleo.

Mystery: Bergen historical group wants its 1812 cannon back. It was stolen in 1980.

The early-1800s iron cannon nicknamed "Old Bergen" stood watch over the Hackensack River from the front of the Steuben House in River Edge beginning in 1942, and there it would still be if it had not been stolen in 1980.Forty-two years have gone by since the theft of the 6-pounder cannon (named for the 6-pound projectiles it fires), possibly used during the Revolutionary War, but the Bergen County Historical Society has never forgotten Old Bergen."Our c. 1810 cannon went missing on May 9, 1980,&quo...

The early-1800s iron cannon nicknamed "Old Bergen" stood watch over the Hackensack River from the front of the Steuben House in River Edge beginning in 1942, and there it would still be if it had not been stolen in 1980.

Forty-two years have gone by since the theft of the 6-pounder cannon (named for the 6-pound projectiles it fires), possibly used during the Revolutionary War, but the Bergen County Historical Society has never forgotten Old Bergen.

"Our c. 1810 cannon went missing on May 9, 1980," the historical society posted on social media on July 2. "We want it back."

Why now, after four decades, is the society asking the thieves to return it?

Deborah Powell, a former president of the historical society and chair of the Historic New Bridge Landing State Park Commission, said that after law enforcement started investigating thefts reported by other museums, the society thought it was time to bring the cannon theft back into the spotlight.

"Maybe enough time has passed that someone will come forward with information about our cannon's whereabouts," Powell said.

There is no shortage of theories about what happened to the 800-pound cannon back on May 9, 1980, when it "disappeared."

One popular theory is that a few men who may have had too much to drink picked it up and carried it across the street to the footbridge that crosses the Hackensack River and dumped it into the water.

"It was dropped over the bridge, right in front," Bradley Luberto told the society. He explained in a Facebook post in response to the "we want it back" post that a "good source in Bergenfield" told him it was a "drunken spree of a few guys" who took the cannon and dumped it into the river.

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Powell said she has received calls and messages telling the society to look just a few feet away in the river for the missing cannon.

"There's no way," Powell said, that it was dumped in the river. She said it would have gotten stuck on the mud part of the river bottom that slopes into the water. "The cannon is heavy," she said, "meaning there's no way one person could carry it into the river."

It is not clear whether the cannon was reported stolen and whether there was an investigation.

Reginald McMahon, a late member of the society, researched and wrote about the cannon before his death.

"On the night of May 9, 1980, 'Old Bergen' disappeared," he wrote. "Thieves, obviously strong-armed, lifted the hundreds of pounds of iron from its mount and its fate remains a mystery."

He believed the cannon may have been purchased to defend Hackensack from the British in the War of 1812. The weapon, 5 feet, 6 inches long, was fired on Independence Day for some years in Hackensack before it was stored for a number of years. McMahon, in an effort to get the cannon back, drew a sketch of it.

McMahon's research dates the manufacturing of the cannon to 1810 to 1825. He wrote that it makes sense that it was manufactured to be used in the War of 1812.

"The cannon is an artifact that provides important context to an emerging story of Bergen County in a new nation and the challenges we faced," Powell said.

Anyone with information on the cannon is asked to contact the Bergen County Historical Society and leave a message on the answering machine at 201-343-9492 or email [email protected]

David Burke, NJ’s Rockstar Chef, Serves Flavor, Fun and Surprise

While there’s nothing gourmet about a box of Cracker Jacks, chef David Burke finds inspiration in the idea of the surprise inside. “That’s the game I like to play,” he says. “Why not? What if? It’s only a plate of food. Let’s see how it goes.”Anyone could serve strips of bacon thicker and meatier than the cafeteria norm. But only Burke sends them out, three to an order, pinned to a miniature clothesline. His whimsy also has a practical side.Packaging takeout pizza at his Union Bea...

While there’s nothing gourmet about a box of Cracker Jacks, chef David Burke finds inspiration in the idea of the surprise inside. “That’s the game I like to play,” he says. “Why not? What if? It’s only a plate of food. Let’s see how it goes.”

Anyone could serve strips of bacon thicker and meatier than the cafeteria norm. But only Burke sends them out, three to an order, pinned to a miniature clothesline. His whimsy also has a practical side.

Packaging takeout pizza at his Union Beach restaurant, the GOAT, staffers first toss popcorn mixed with Parmesan and pesto into the empty box. It makes a fun snack in itself, but it also lifts the pizza so it doesn’t sweat and lose its crispness.

“Starting out,” he says, “I thought the only way I would have an edge was to do something that makes you scratch your head or smile. After decades of doing it, it’s built into my style.”

Who but Burke sends out whisks covered in chocolate batter for customers to lick before their Tin Can cake arrives? Then there’s the cricket pizza—topped with actual crickets—on the menu at the GOAT, Burke’s newest restaurant, which happens to be half a mile from where he grew up in Hazlet. “We’ve only sold one,” he admits. “It’s more for schtick.”

The Culinary Institute of America graduate, who was named executive chef of the legendary River Café in Brooklyn at the age of 26, is now 60 and runs eight restaurants in New Jersey—including the NJM Top 30’s Red Horse by David Burke in Rumson and 1776 in Morristown—and seven more arrayed from New York to Saudi Arabia. In 1988, Burke became the first American to win the prestigious Meilleurs Ouvriers de France (MOF) diploma of honor. Burke credits his parents—a former New York City subway conductor and a former housekeeping manager—for his blue-collar grit and the drive to still put in 80-hour weeks.

If you’re lucky enough to spend a morning with the impresario at his towering Tudor mansion in Atlantic Highlands, the whimsy is on full display. Sure, there’s a massive outdoor cooking space with enough stainless steel to beam signals to Mars. Less expected is the life-size, painted horse statue on his deck. (It was meant for Red Horse, but didn’t quite fit.) Beyond the swimming pool, there’s a wall, not of wood or brick, but of giant Legos assembled by Burke himself. In Burke’s executive office—er, his dining room—sits a Humpty Dumpty statue more than 3 feet tall that once graced the David Burke Tavern in Manhattan.

Of course, you can’t ride to the top on whimsy alone. “You have to be able to do it correctly,” Burke says. “If you’re a pitcher, you don’t throw a curveball with every pitch.”

After an 8:30 am conference call with his business manager in Charlotte, Burke jumps on Zoom to go over designs for a new bistro on Park Avenue in Manhattan slated for next year. Just when he seems visibly bored with color choices for tables and walls, in walks his handyman, Rob Petsch, carrying molds that he’s cut from PVC pipes for a lobster dish that Burke hasn’t made for more than a decade, but just remembered and wants to recreate. On a side table, there happens to be a duck decoy. Burke asks Petsch to paint it with the same spattered finish that’s on the new wood-burning pizza oven at the GOAT. Burke intends to give it as a gift to his new lady friend.

Burke’s executive assistant, Alison Kelly, keeps an online calendar of all his upcoming meetings and appearances. There’s also a giant whiteboard calendar set up in the dining room. It’s filled with Burke’s TV appearances, wine-pairing dinners, and meetings to discuss projects. One that stands out is the July 5 Fireman’s Fair in Atlantic Highlands. Burke’s newly acquired bakery, the 85-year-old Dixie Lee in Keansburg, will supply several dozen pies for an old-fashioned pie-eating contest.

The last order of business before Burke slides into his Maserati Levante SUV to visit several of his restaurants is to consider names for a restaurant in Lake Park, Florida, he expects to open in the fall of 2024.

“What about the Old Man?” asks Burke.

“Salty Dog?” Kelly ventures.

“Too much like a college beer joint. Aqua? Aqua House?”

“Water Dog?”

Kelly googles Water Dog. “Water dog is another name for a sailor…. There’s a Water Dog Smokehouse in Ventnor.”

“Water Dog works,” says Burke, who goes on to describe a dog in the prow of a boat peering through a spyglass. This suggests a new name. “I like Canoe Club,” he says, and lays out the possibility of actual canoes suspended in the restaurant. Some of them might wind up as conversation pieces in Burke’s house, joining his collection of birdhouse cuckoo clocks that go off at random times, souvenirs from his erstwhile Woodpecker Pizza Bar in Manhattan.

The tuna tartare at David Burke’s Morristown restaurant, 1776. Photo by Christopher Lane

Just past the clocks is one of Burke’s most prized possessions, a framed study for Maxfield Parrish’s famous mural of Old King Cole, commissioned by John Jacob Astor and now hanging at the St. Regis Hotel on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. Pointing out that the courtiers in the painting are grimacing and one is reaching for his nose, Burke announces with schoolboy glee, “It’s a painting about a fart!”—a joke that Parrish played on Astor.

It’s the kind of thing Burke loves. What boy wouldn’t? And that’s what you discover when you spend a morning with the entrepreneurial chef. He is still the boy who convinced his health-nut father to come to show-and-tell to demonstrate chocolate fondue; who loved going to the car wash for the spectacle of spray and soapy flapping straps; whose pipe dream of Jersey oil refineries being filled with water “so we could swim in them” led friends to dub him Imagine If Burkey.

Now he’s the grown man who delights in putting crispy crickets on pizza; who imagines turning his home into the set of a reality show featuring three live-in apprentice chefs; who says that, of all his restaurants, including some fancy ones, he thinks the one that will make him happiest is the little Dixie Lee bakery. Imagine If Burkey envisions it with a cotton candy machine, a doughnut machine and a chocolate fountain.

What kid wouldn’t?

Debbie Galant is a frequent contributor to New Jersey Monthly.

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In fight against commercialization, park preservationists champion a beach for the birds

Caven Point at Liberty State Park, left, is an important area for migratory birds. It sits adjacent to Liberty National Golf Club, right, in Jersey City. (Danielle P. Richards for New Jersey Monitor)The half-mile stretch of Caven Point beach seems fairly ordinary, as beaches go.Birds fish in the flats and perch in the reeds, their calls the only sound breaking the silence of this nature preserve inside Liberty State Park. Snails called mud dog whelks that look like rocks tumble around the water’s edge. Seaweed scattered b...

Caven Point at Liberty State Park, left, is an important area for migratory birds. It sits adjacent to Liberty National Golf Club, right, in Jersey City. (Danielle P. Richards for New Jersey Monitor)

The half-mile stretch of Caven Point beach seems fairly ordinary, as beaches go.

Birds fish in the flats and perch in the reeds, their calls the only sound breaking the silence of this nature preserve inside Liberty State Park. Snails called mud dog whelks that look like rocks tumble around the water’s edge. Seaweed scattered by the tides dries in the sun.

But Caven Point is far from ordinary.

Its shoreline is the longest uninterrupted stretch of natural beach in the Upper New York Bay and Hudson River. Its location — along the Atlantic Flyway and within the harbor estuary — has made it a favorite stop for migrating birds, including several endangered species. And it is again at the center of a battle between preservationists, state lawmakers, and a billionaire golf course owner.

Lorraine Freeney was among the first in line fighting to protect this ordinary, extraordinary beach.

The avid birder, who launched a Facebook group for fellow bird-lovers and started documenting the area’s avian population, this year became an unexpected lobbyist, calling and emailing her local lawmakers to implore them to protect Caven Point and other parts of the 1,200-acre park from developers who have proposed building arenas, athletic fields, and more here.

In one of the most densely populated parts of the state, Caven Point offers urbanites a close-to-home opportunity to see horseshoe crabs, endangered birds, and sometimes even harbor seals, comb the shore for shells, and learn firsthand about pollution, climate change, and habitat preservation, Freeney said.

“Caven Point is not just for hardcore birders — it’s for everyone,” Freeney said. “To have a beautiful public space and such an important educational resource on our doorsteps is a gift. Caven Point is one of a kind, and if it’s destroyed, there’s no bringing it back.”

A fast-tracked law

Caven Point has become a flashpoint in the fight against development in Liberty State Park. Environmentalists and park supporters have fended off efforts to commercialize more parts of the park almost since it opened in 1976 in Jersey City, across the New York Harbor from Manhattan. Aside from a marina, two restaurants, and a few other businesses, Liberty State Park is home mostly to passive parkland.

In recent years, their attention has been on billionaire Paul Fireman, who owns the luxury golf course next door.

Fireman backed off plans in 2020 to expand his golf course into a 22-acre section of Caven Point after the public revolted. But last month, when state lawmakers fast-tracked legislation creating a task force to recommend redevelopment of the park and allocating $50 million to fund it, critics suspected Fireman was the force behind it all.

He has said nothing publicly about any new plans and did not respond to the New Jersey Monitor’s request for comment. But his company lobbied for the bill, Politico reported, and his attorney attended several recent public hearings on it.

“We’ve seen powerful people dance, and we’ve seen people on our side switch to the other side, breaking our hearts, all because this guy has enough money to influence folks. And obviously he’s not alone. He’s one of many,” said Greg Remaud of the NY/NJ Baykeeper.

Remaud, Freeney, and other park preservationists pushed for lawmakers to amend the law, which Gov. Phil Murphy signed in late June, to carve out Caven Point for special protection. They refused.

Just before the Legislature recessed for the summer, Sen. Brian Stack (D-Hudson), who sponsored the development bill, instead followed up with another bill that would preserve Caven Point.

But that bill, which has yet to receive a committee hearing, did little to appease skeptics.

“If lawmakers want to protect Caven Point so badly, why didn’t they include it in the task force bill?” said Alex Ambrose, a policy analyst with New Jersey Policy Perspective who has advocated for the park’s preservation. “We would be glad to be proven wrong.”

What’s at stake

Caven Point can be hard to find in a state park whose jagged boundaries seem to have been drawn by a toddler.

Situated on the park’s southern end, near a gated community called Port Liberte and Fireman’s Liberty National Golf Club, the peninsula is a sprawling wilderness of wetlands, with the beach on one side, a paved path on the other, and a winding boardwalk and nature trails connecting the two.

It used to be a popular hangout for skinny-dipping locals who dubbed it Bare Ass Beach.

It’s been more serene in the spring and summer since the state closed it off to the public from April through September, except for occasional guided tours and classes, to protect migratory birds’ nests. Thousands of birds flock there, including endangered and threatened species like peregrine falcons and American kestrels.

Mandy Edgecombe has been a fan of Caven Point since 2011, when she interned as a park naturalist and began leading kayak tours there.

She’s always been baffled by the demands for development there, noting the critical role the area plays as the harbor’s last remaining salt marsh.

“If a storm happens, Caven Point is going to absorb so much water and so much storm surge energy because that’s what salt marshes do,” Edgecombe said. “Caven Point will literally protect the golf course from being flooded, so it makes no sense to me why they would want to do anything to it.”

As a tour guide, she barely had enough time to recount all the various species kayakers could encounter there.

“Estuaries are the nurseries of the sea, and salt marshes are where they have their babies in that nursery of the sea,” she said. “Salt marshes have more diversity than the Amazon rainforest.”

Preservationists are counting on the park’s history to help protect the peninsula from development now. The state bought Caven Point with 1978 Green Acres bond funds. That restricts the site’s use to public recreation and conservation.

But supporters think education can help save Caven Point too, which is what drives Edgecombe, Freeney, and others in their advocacy.

“There is a lot of anger and frustration with what’s been happening at Liberty State Park, and a feeling that it is being privatized and parceled off in direct opposition to what most people of Jersey City actually want,” Freeney said. “There are certainly ways that Liberty State Park could be improved, but destroying or selling off Caven Point is not one of them.”

This story was produced in collaboration with CivicStory and the NJ Sustainability Reporting project.

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