HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Tenafly, NJ

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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

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Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Tenafly, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
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Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Tenafly, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

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Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

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Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

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Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

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What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

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Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
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What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

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Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Tenafly, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Tenafly, NJ

New Jersey high schools could start later in the day if this bill passes

An extra half-hour or more of sleep in the morning is a possibility for New Jersey's high school students if legislation introduced last week gains enough support.The bill calls for a later start time for the school day to boost mental health and wellness among teenagers, said its sponsors, Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin, D-Middlesex, and Sen. Vin Gopal, D-Monmouth, chair of the Education Committee.The bill calls for a start time of 8:30 a.m. or later. Currently, most state high schools have a starting time betw...

An extra half-hour or more of sleep in the morning is a possibility for New Jersey's high school students if legislation introduced last week gains enough support.

The bill calls for a later start time for the school day to boost mental health and wellness among teenagers, said its sponsors, Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin, D-Middlesex, and Sen. Vin Gopal, D-Monmouth, chair of the Education Committee.

The bill calls for a start time of 8:30 a.m. or later. Currently, most state high schools have a starting time between 7:20 and 7:40 a.m.

Research shows teenagers tend to fall asleep around 11 p.m. and are more likely to suffer depression and anxiety if they do not get enough sleep.

Some districts have already made the change to start the school day later in the morning.

Tenafly High School made the change in 2019 and begins four out of the five days per week at 8:10 a.m. and the fifth day at 8:30 a.m. The Millburn district pushed its start time later by 20 and 25 minutes for an 8 a.m. start for the middle and high schools last September. Last month, Chatham school officials decided to push the start time for their high school and elementary schools to later in the morning starting next school year.

Ridgewood High School considered switching to a later start, but it has held off making a decision. Princeton and South Orange/Maplewood high schools switched to later start times in 2018 and 2017 respectively. A spokesperson for Tenafly school district said West Caldwell district had consulted with them three years ago and shifted their start times.

The legislation comes on the heels of the pandemic, whose impact on students' social and emotional health has become a concern. The New Jersey Department of Children and Families' hotline received more than 14,000 calls from parents and youth seeking help in February, the highest number recorded in its history, with more calls expected in March. The state run Children's System of Care sent 4,201 mobile dispatch units to families and youth needing urgent care to address mental health needs, compared to 2,582 dispatches during the same period last year. The youth mental health crisis is a "parallel pandemic," Christine Breyer, commissioner of the department, said at a hearing in the Senate in March.

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The spotlight on mental health, and previous research that proves teenagers tend to feel sleepy two to three hours later than adults, and that late school starts resulted in better grades and improved wellness, paved the way for lawmakers to introduce the legislation.

"This has been suggested for a while, but what really brought it to the forefront is the fact that we have a growing crisis of young people who face mental health challenges in part because of the pandemic," Coughlin told The Record/NorthJersey.com.

State lawmakers have been aware of the need for later start times for years, Coughlin said. In 2019, districts were invited to participate in a later start time pilot study. When the pandemic hit in early 2020, schools switched to remote learning and the pilot study was not implemented.

However, remote learning and adjusted school schedules during the pandemic gave staff and students a taste of what it would be like to have a late start, adding impetus to the effort of making those schedule changes permanent.

“Nothing has proven school districts are capable of making rapid changes to adapt and optimize student learning more than the pandemic,” Coughlin said, noting that this moment in time was also the best window to propose a law that would apply to all public high schools, which have already demonstrated flexibility in the face of change.

"There is that biological shift in teenagers' circadian rhythms that are very different from kids or adults. They have a two- to three-hour phased-in delay when they fall asleep and when they wake up," said Dr. Bert Mandelbaum, chair of the New Jersey branch of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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Making teenagers wake up at 6 a.m. to be in school by 7:20 a.m. for seven or eight years of their lives makes them sleep-deprived, Mandelbaum said. He runs a voluntary, grassroots task force on school and sleep start times, and has been advocating for later high school start times in the state for five years.

The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have all made policy statements recommending start times of 8:30 a.m. or later for teenagers.

Mandelbaum said he has been invited to school districts to make presentations that demonstrate the science behind later start times, but logistical and cost issues often got in the way of decision-makers. He welcomed the legislation proposed by Coughlin and Gopal because it would require all schools to change and make necessary adjustments such as tightening bus routes in districts that share buses for elementary schools and higher.

Transportation obstacles were the most serious logistical problem faced by districts interested in a later start time. After-school conflicts arose especially for athletic events between schools with different start and end times. Mandelbaum said these problems created the need for legislation to smooth things out.

"We are hearing from our middle and high school students that even this half-hour change has been a great benefit to them," said Millburn High School's spokesperson, Nancy Dries. The school moved start times back by about a half-hour to start middle and high school at 8 a.m. when school reopened in September after the pandemic. Dries said the 8 a.m. shift is not as ideal as 8:30, and that the school is "very interested to see what comes out of Trenton."

Nobody has argued the science behind changing start times, said Mandelbaum, meaning that implementing this change is the real hurdle. He said the state's largest teachers' union, the New Jersey Education Association (NJEA), has a representative on the task force, as does the New Jersey School Boards Association and the New Jersey School Nurses Association. He said Gopal will be meeting with the task force next week.

The NJEA said it has not reviewed the bill or issued a formal statement about it, but is open to the idea.

"We are well aware of a large body of research that indicates that later start times would be physiologically and academically beneficial to many teenagers. We believe that any reform that might benefit students is well worth considering and implementing," NJEA spokesperson Steven Baker said in a statement.

Mary Ann Koruth covers education for NorthJersey.com. To get unlimited access to the latest news about New Jersey's schools and how it affects your children, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Steinberg elevated to president of The Community Chest of Eastern Bergen County’s Board of Managers

The Community Chest of Eastern Bergen County on Friday announced that Franci Steinberg was named president of the Board of Managers. Steinberg, who previously served as vice president, has been an active member of The Chest’s Board of Managers since 2014 and a member of the Executive Committee since 2018.“We are excited to have Franci Steinberg move into the leadership role of president on the Board of Managers. From her previous experiences se...

The Community Chest of Eastern Bergen County on Friday announced that Franci Steinberg was named president of the Board of Managers. Steinberg, who previously served as vice president, has been an active member of The Chest’s Board of Managers since 2014 and a member of the Executive Committee since 2018.

“We are excited to have Franci Steinberg move into the leadership role of president on the Board of Managers. From her previous experiences serving on The Community Chest’s Marketing and Communications Committee, Young Women’s Scholarship Program, and the Governance and Events Committees, as well as being involved with the Allocations Committee, she understands the organization’s mission and programs. During her term, we look forward to her bringing boundless energy to the board and our activities,” Dr. Shelly Wimpfheimer, executive director, The Community Chest of Eastern Bergen County stated.

The Chest leads initiatives and supports nonprofits that make communities stronger and benefit people in need in eastern Bergen County. Each year, The Chest raises funds and allocates them to agencies demonstrating the capacity to provide services to local citizens. The organization also provides coordinating and planning services in its communities, serving as a bridge between agencies and organizations and investing in the stability and quality of the service network.

Steinberg, a former resident of Tenafly, has supported and led several activities with The Chest, especially with communications and graphic design projects. She updated and maintained the organization’s website, designed and produced the printed communications, created media and electronic emails for events and changed the Allocations Admissions’ online application process and other programs to online and digital formats.

In addition to her work with The Community Chest, Steinberg has held leadership positions with several other organizations. Currently, she is treasurer of Sisterhood of Temple Sinai, and was a former president on its board of trustees. Previously, she was executive vice president on Temple Sinai of Bergen County’s board of trustees. Steinberg has also been active with the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey, as chair for The Center for Israel Engagement and as a member of its Women’s Philanthropy Board of Directors. She also was active in the Tenafly Public Schools holding leadership positions, including president of the Smith School Home and School Association and also at Dwight Englewood Middle School.

For further information about The Chest, visit www.thecommunitychestebc.org/ or contact (201) 568-7474. Stay updated about the organization’s activities on Facebook and Instagram.

How a Bergen County teenager became an Olympic hopeful in fencing

The power went off. The practice went on.A legend was born.It was October 2012, and Rachael Kim was at a much different stage of her career. She was not the globetrotting teenager with two national titles and a World Championship gold hanging on her bed frame. She was an upstart fencer from Tenafly who was just learning the tools of the trade.So when Superstorm Sandy knocked the lights out at her gym, she and her club teammates fell back on a trait that's inherent in foil: the ability to think one step ahe...

The power went off. The practice went on.

A legend was born.

It was October 2012, and Rachael Kim was at a much different stage of her career. She was not the globetrotting teenager with two national titles and a World Championship gold hanging on her bed frame. She was an upstart fencer from Tenafly who was just learning the tools of the trade.

So when Superstorm Sandy knocked the lights out at her gym, she and her club teammates fell back on a trait that's inherent in foil: the ability to think one step ahead.

"We practiced with candles," coach Seoung Woo Lee said. "It's no way to practice, but we really wanted to get better. She really wanted to. All her teammates, too. We asked them to bring candles, and then we practiced."

The memory of an unusual practice flooded back to him this April on a much brighter day in Dubai.

Kim, now 17, went there for the Fencing World Championships and brought home the gold as part of the winning team in junior women's foil. It was the pinnacle of her career — so far — and especially impressive considering that her three American teammates were all college-age. If all goes well, it will be a steppingstone to an Olympic career.

"It was really shocking," Kim said. "It was my first world championships, so I didn't really expect it."

Kim may have a busier travel schedule than any high school athlete in North Jersey. She has competed in Croatia, Mexico, Serbia and Germany, and that's in this year alone.

Plus, she spends plenty of time in Northvale, training for about 15 hours a week at the Top Fencing Club.

Making up schoolwork and testing can be a challenge, but a recent move to Paramus Catholic has provided greater flexibility for the rising senior.

"I really like the fencing community. It's a pretty small community," Kim said. "You know a lot of people and a lot of people know you. Even though it's a super competitive sport, everyone is kind and caring for each other and always cheering each other on."

Kim started fencing when she was 7. Her coach went to the same church and convinced her to sign up, with a push from Rachael's mom. Kim was apprehensive at first, but she overcame her shorter stature with a combination of speed, strategy and technique.

"I definitely do get nervous sometimes," Kim said. "To calm myself down, I usually listen to music and try to get my mind off everything and try to relax."

Kim will finally get a chance to relax over the next six weeks. She wrapped up the season last week at the Summer Nationals in Minneapolis.

She's currently ranked 31st in the world on the junior level, which goes up to age 20. She's open about her Olympic ambitions, having already practiced and fenced with athletes who have competed in the quadrennial event.

"USA hosts the Olympics [in 2028]," Lee said. "We have a chance to do that. I think we have a chance."

The longtime coach also applauded Kim for how she's balanced academics with a rigorous athletic schedule.

Kim admits that all the travel can be tiring, although it's given her a chance to see the world. Her favorite spot to visit has been Budapest — "a really beautiful city" that was home to her first international tournament.

Of course, there's no place quite like the top step of the podium.

No candlelight necessary.

"I was very surprised that I was able to get that opportunity," Kim said. "Hearing that national anthem really made me happy to be able to represent USA."

Sean Farrell is a high school sports reporter for NorthJersey.com. For full access to live scores, breaking news and analysis from our Varsity Aces team, subscribe today. To get breaking news directly to your inbox, sign up for our newsletter and download our app.

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North Jersey animal shelters facing severe overcrowding due to inflation

Record inflation has caused an overcrowding crisis for North Jersey's animal shelters with fewer people able to afford their current pets or to adopt a new one.As families adjust to life after the pandemic and transition back to the office and the classroom, they are finding it difficult to care for pets. Some are relocating out of state for work and others are moving into apartments that prohibit pets.Others are financially burdened and cannot afford the cost of veterinary care and see no other option but to sur...

Record inflation has caused an overcrowding crisis for North Jersey's animal shelters with fewer people able to afford their current pets or to adopt a new one.

As families adjust to life after the pandemic and transition back to the office and the classroom, they are finding it difficult to care for pets. Some are relocating out of state for work and others are moving into apartments that prohibit pets.

Others are financially burdened and cannot afford the cost of veterinary care and see no other option but to surrender their animals.

Robyn Urman, founder of Pet ResQ Inc. in Tenafly said, “my goal became keeping animals in their homes instead of removing them. So we will supply food, toys, treat, whatever I can get my hands on. I help people pay vet bills, it’s just become a snowball effect.”

Finding homes for pets is a huge challenge and with an increase in the number of animals being surrendered due to financial hardships and housing challenges, animal shelters are at capacity.

Urman said the foster-based rescue has approximately 18 dogs that are housed in six foster homes and cannot afford anymore.

She said the cost to take care of one dog that was neglected is expensive, costing well over $1,000. Urman had to turn down animals because she is already financially burdened by the ones she currently has.

“Right now I’m full,” Urman said. “I took in a little Cavapoo for example… she has a grade-six heart murmur, she has what they call a PDA and she needs surgery, she will not live six months without it. Her surgery is $8,000.”

Urman, who has been rescuing dogs since 1983 said not being able to take in any more dogs scares and guilts her. She contacts other foster families to see if they are able to take in more however finding fosters is one of her biggest challenges.

Pet ResQ does not have the financial means or the labor force to take in any more animals and is seeking more volunteers, foster parents, and pet lovers who are interested in adopting.

In the past six weeks, five dogs have been surrendered and Urman finalized six adoptions and currently has two pending.

Sarah Sangree, director of community engagement at St. Hubert’s Animal Welfare Center with locations in Madison and Somerville, said to date, 404 animals have been surrendered and 35 of those animals have been since July 1.

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The shelter finalized 140 adoptions since July and currently has 529 animals, of which 328 are cats and 152 are dogs.

“We are finding that a lot of people are having housing issues whether it’s just the landlord saying no pets or whether they’re being evicted,” Sangree said. “We’ve [also] seen a number of people that are moving across the country, it’s kind of COVID-related job changes.”

She said at St. Hubert’s, they support pet owners and the human-animal bond, and they aim to keep pets in homes whenever possible.

“When people want to keep their pets and they think that they’re going to be able to sort things out within about a month or so we do try to get them into our emergency boarding program,” Sangree said.

The emergency boarding program is for people in a life crisis such as facing eviction or homelessness and don’t want to surrender their pets. It allows them to leave their pet at the shelter for about 30 days if they aren’t aggressive.

If the animal isn’t already, they must agree to allow St. Hubert’s to provide the animal with spaying and neutering and any missing vaccines free of charge.

Financial hardships and the cost of veterinary care, according to Liz Taranda, vice president at Clifton Animal Shelter, is the reason why they have taken in over 180 cats since Jan. 1. Of those, 46 were surrendered in June.

“We are finding that a lot of cats are not being spayed and neutered due to inflation and people not being able to afford the spaying and neutering and that is what’s causing also the huge influx of animals,” Taranda said.

Taranda, who is also the head of the cat department, said being educated on the importance of spaying and neutering is crucial. When families have a cat that has kittens, they call the shelter to remove 10 to 12 kittens from their house.

She said people who are surrendering wait until the last minute to call the shelter without realizing they might not be in the position to take the animal at that exact moment. They take in animals in the order of request and in order of urgency.

According to Evelyn Ackley Raps, president of the shelter and head of the dog department, dogs aren’t being surrendered as much as kittens.

“Kittens are coming in at an alarming pace,” Raps said.

Clifton Animal Shelter finalized 122 cat adoptions since Jan. 1 and three recent dog adoptions.

Along with its emergency boarding program, St. Hubert has partnered with eight different domestic violence shelters and created a safe haven program. This program is for individuals who are experiencing domestic violence and cannot take their pets with them to a housing shelter.

“Think before you leap,” Urman said. “If you’re going to get a dog, you really need to consider all that goes into it and they need to be trained, and they need to be vet cared.”

Davaughnia Wilson is an intern reporter for Northjersey.com. Contact Davaughnia at [email protected]

Fourth of July events in North Jersey

NorthJersey.comParades. Carnivals. Concerts.After two years of canceled or tamped-down celebrations, towns across North Jersey are once again hosting gatherings and activities for Independence Day on Monday, July 4.It's an opportunity to get out with friends and family after the COVID-19 disruption of 2020 and 2021, marking a return of before-times normalcy for many.Presented by Mayor Michael Melham and the Township Council, the night sky will light up with fireworks over Belleville Municipal Stadiu...

NorthJersey.com

Parades. Carnivals. Concerts.

After two years of canceled or tamped-down celebrations, towns across North Jersey are once again hosting gatherings and activities for Independence Day on Monday, July 4.

It's an opportunity to get out with friends and family after the COVID-19 disruption of 2020 and 2021, marking a return of before-times normalcy for many.

Presented by Mayor Michael Melham and the Township Council, the night sky will light up with fireworks over Belleville Municipal Stadium at dusk on July 1 for fireworks. There will be face painting rides, clowns, food trucks, and music provided by a DJ.

Events are also planned for July 4, including the Color Run at Belleville High School’s main entrance at 11 a.m. To volunteer for the Color Run, write to [email protected]

A Fireworks Spectaular will follow a performance by the Infernos at the Essex County Summer Concert Series on July 1 at 7:30 p.m. in Brookdale Park. Admission is free. For information, call the Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs at 973 268-3500.

There will be fireworks on June 25 at 6 p.m. at Walter T. Bergen School. The rain date is June 26.

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There will be a fireworks display on July 1 at dusk at Clifton Stadium, 350 Piaget Ave., with entertainment by the Clifton Community Band. $3. Advance tickets are available at the City Clerk's office. On July 1, the ticket office at the stadium will open at 7 p.m.

Garden State Fireworks will present fireworks displays on July 3 and July 4 at State Fair Meadowlands at Metlife Stadium starting after 10 p.m. Free with the purchase of a Fun Pass, the show can be watched by fairgoers from anywhere on the fairgrounds. The pyrotechnics will be choreographed to patriotic music. Parking is free. The fair is open from 2 p.m. to 1 a.m. Tickets must be purchased in advance at njfair.com.

The Glen Rock Independence Day Parade will take place on July 4.

4th of July at Foschini Park: Food trucks and family games at 5 p.m. Performance by Fillet of Soul at 7:30. Fireworks Spectacular at 9.

Be preparedExpect a warm, slightly rainy 4th of July weekend

The members of the Kinnelon Volunteer Fire Company welcome everyone to their Annual Free Car Wash Fundraiser on July 4, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Wash Hounds, 1167 Route 23, Kinnelon. This is an opportunity to help support the Kinnelon volunteer firefighters and say hello to Wash Hounds Car Wash, Detailing & Lube. All donations directly support the Kinnelon Volunteer Fire Company.

A Beach Party will be held at Lincoln Park Community Lake on July 2, from 2 to 7 p.m. The Benjamins will play at the pavilion from 3 to 5. $5 for borough residents; $15 for resident guests and non-residents; free for anyone ages 3 and under. Residents may purchase up to four tickets for non-resident guests.

On July 4, the parade - dedicated to the memory of the late Al Pelham - will feature marching bands, floats, public officials and grand marshals Toni’s Kitchen and the Human Needs Food Pantry.

Movie in the Park: July 1.

Music in the Park: July 3.

Parade and Family Fair: July 4, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Veteran's Memorial Park, Continental Avenue, River Edge. Line-up starts at 10:15 a.m. The parade will start in front of Cherry Hill School and march up Bogert Road to Continental Avenue and end in front of Memorial Park. Following the parade, the Family Fair in the park will start at noon. There will be amusements, food, entertainment, music and the traditional vendor section.

On July 2, there will be fireworks at Memorial Park. Festivities begin around 7 p.m. Sponsored by Felician University.

Tenafly

All residents are invited to attend the town wide Independence Day celebration from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on June 25 at the Roosevelt Common for amusements, games, food, and fun followed by a fireworks display at approximately 9 p.m. behind Tenafly High School. Divinity Roxx will be entertaining the crowd before the fireworks display at 7:30 p.m. Rain date for the celebration and fireworks is June 26. For more information, visit tenaflynj.org

July 1 at the Verona Community Center field complex, 880 Bloomfield Ave. D.J. begins at 7 p.m. Fireworks are at about 9:20 p.m.

On July 1, the West Milford Township Independence Day Celebration and Fireworks Display will take place behind West Milford High School from 6 to 9:45 p.m. There will be amusements, food, music, and fireworks for $10 per car. Please no pets, no coolers; chairs permitted. Bags subject to search. Rain date will be July 2.

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