HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Victory Gardens, NJ

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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Victory Gardens, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Victory Gardens, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Victory Gardens, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Victory Gardens, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Victory Gardens, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Victory Gardens, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Victory Gardens, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Victory Gardens, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Victory Gardens, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Victory Gardens, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Victory Gardens, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When there is an increased concentration of growth hormone by the pituitary gland, there are positive benefits to the body. Some benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Victory Gardens, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Victory Gardens, NJ

Meet This Year’s Award-Winning Therapeutic Gardens

National Garden Bureau, along with program sponsors American Meadows, Ball Horticultural Company, and Sakata Seed America, has announced the five therapeutic gardens receiving grants and in-kind donations totaling more than $7,500.This announcement marks the 10th year that National Garden Bureau has provided much-needed resources for worthy therapeutic gardens. This funding allows these gardens to continue, and even expand, their ...

National Garden Bureau, along with program sponsors American Meadows, Ball Horticultural Company, and Sakata Seed America, has announced the five therapeutic gardens receiving grants and in-kind donations totaling more than $7,500.

This announcement marks the 10th year that National Garden Bureau has provided much-needed resources for worthy therapeutic gardens. This funding allows these gardens to continue, and even expand, their good work for deserving clients.

After a two-week online voting period, the public has named the five winning gardens:

Insight Garden Program, San Gabriel, CA (First place vote-recipient; winner of a $3,000 grant)

Insight Garden Program’s mission is to facilitate innovative gardening and landscaping training so that people in prison can reconnect to self, community, and the natural world.

UT Gardens Horticultural Therapy, Knoxville, TN (Runner-Up; winner of a $1,500 grant)

The University of Tennessee (UT) Gardens is a 10-acre garden utilized by students and the community. This horticultural therapy program launched in 2012 and has served over 9,000 people to date.

Care Plus Horticultural Therapy, Paramus, NJ (Runner-Up; winner of a $1,000 grant)

The program at Bergen New Bridge Medical Center is designed for adult residents with multiple and complex challenges that require a regular regimen of care and attention by qualified health professionals.

Edgerton Hospital Healing Garden, Edgerton, WI (Runner-Up; winner of a $1,000 grant)

Edgerton Hospital and Health Services has maintained a 3-acre healing garden for 12 years, intending to provide passive and active horticulture engagement for patients, staff, visitors, and the public.

Skyland Trail Horticultural Therapy Program, Atlanta, GA (Runner-Up; winner of a $1,000 grant)

Skyland Trail provides residential mental health treatment for adults and teens. Horticultural therapy, including expert-led groups in the gardens and greenhouse, is a critical component of their whole person approach to wellness.

National Garden Bureau, American Meadows, Ball Horticultural Company, and Sakata Seed America would like to recognize all grant applicants that participated this year. All are listed on the NGB website. NGB encourages support of these and other therapeutic gardens by industry, local communities, and individuals.

The judges who read all the applications and narrowed them down to the five finalists deserve a huge thank-you. Those judges are:

For more information about National Garden Bureau, please contact Diane Blazek.

nourish.NJ Expands and Adapts to Support Thousands More in Morris County

Photo Credit: nourish.NJnourish.NJ's new building renderingPhoto Credit: nourish.NJ By nourish.NJPublishedSeptember 9, 2022 at 11:46 AMFor nearly forty years, nourish.NJ has dedicated every day to providing lasting solutions to hunger, homelessness and poverty in the Morristown area. nourish.NJ has continuously adapted to meet the increasing and shifting needs of their neighbors. Yet, in recent times, it has become abundantly clear that the impact...

Photo Credit: nourish.NJ

nourish.NJ's new building renderingPhoto Credit: nourish.NJ

By nourish.NJ

PublishedSeptember 9, 2022 at 11:46 AM

For nearly forty years, nourish.NJ has dedicated every day to providing lasting solutions to hunger, homelessness and poverty in the Morristown area. nourish.NJ has continuously adapted to meet the increasing and shifting needs of their neighbors. Yet, in recent times, it has become abundantly clear that the impact of hunger, homelessness and poverty in their community is as inflated as current prices, and extends far beyond Morristown.

With costs-of-living continuing to rise, and a 30%+ increase in their clientele as of late, it is obvious that this is just the beginning of an unprecedented demand for nourish.NJ’s programs and offerings. In light of this, they’re undertaking their greatest adaptation yet; They’ve begun the process of expanding both geographically and programmatically to tackle increasing poverty rates throughout Morris County.

Geographically, nourish.NJ’s expansion will include the opening of a 6,000 square foot Community Hub in Victory Gardens, the establishment of additional mobile and satellite locations throughout the county, as well as the maintenance and enhancement of their current location and operations in Morristown. Programmatically, with the help of community partners, their expansion will increase the capacity of current programs, such as fresh, daily meals, Free Farmers Markets, case management, employment and physical health programs, and introduce new vocational training, mental health, youth-focused, and immigration support programs. Overall, this expansion will allow nourish.NJ to reach and support thousands more in the near future, and in more dynamic ways than ever before.

Community support is critical in enabling nourish.NJ to be there for Morris County tomorrow, as well as in allowing them to continue being there for the Morristown area today. You can help maintain the organization’s current work by getting involved in the Walk for nourish.NJ, and ensure their ongoing work by donating to the “Campaign to Expand Our Reach”. For more information on nourish.NJ’s expansion plans, and the Walk for nourish.NJ, visit www.nourishnj.org.

Editor's Note: This advertorial content is being published by TAPinto.net as a service for its marketing partners. For more information about how to market your business on TAPinto, please email [email protected].

Victory gardens hold place in history, hearts of those needing a refuge during the pandemic

In April, we were so starved for life and living that we saved a sprouted cooking onion, named it the Hope Onion, and grew it in a vase indoors where we could watch its pale roots get long and tangled. Meanwhile, The New York Times called us “scallion nation,” and people on the Internet thought we all should be victory gardeners again.At the ...

In April, we were so starved for life and living that we saved a sprouted cooking onion, named it the Hope Onion, and grew it in a vase indoors where we could watch its pale roots get long and tangled. Meanwhile, The New York Times called us “scallion nation,” and people on the Internet thought we all should be victory gardeners again.

At the Fenway Victory Gardens on a recent Sunday in May, Brenda Velez, in overalls and a mask, was working her plot.

“I got my seeds ready,” Velez said. “I’m ready to go.”

There are real victory gardeners in Boston already — 405 of them, down on the Fens, tending 15-by-25-foot plots where their own onions have deep roots in the historic ground, where the radishes are up, the lilacs in bloom, and the resurrection in full swing.

Community gardens have been allowed to remain open during the shutdown, and this of course includes the Fenway Victory Gardens. Established in 1942, it is the nation’s oldest surviving war garden. On the original 7.5 acres along the Muddy River, just one block from Fenway Park, it endures.

During World War II, the Fenway Victory Gardens was one of 49 planted all over the city, including on Boston Common. A neighboring piece of land on the Fenway was even maintained as a “model victory garden” by the Globe, which published lengthy front-page articles about its progress.

Victory gardens famously produced 44 percent of Americans’ wartime fruits and vegetables. Some 2,600 families participated in Boston, 20 million nationwide, according to “To Dwell Is to Garden: A History of Boston’s Community Gardens” by Sam Bass Warner Jr.

“I can’t even tell you how exciting it is to be part of that [history],” said Velez, 54, a visual merchandiser who designs store displays and whom the pandemic has forced out of a job.

“I feel like this is another war, a different one. We’re still there [at the Victory Gardens]. We’re not going anywhere,” she said. “We’re still out there with Mother Earth, making the most of things.”

Americans have gardened through many of the great crises in our history, and those without their own land have planted on public property.

During the depression of the 1890s, Mayor Hazen Pingree created potato patch gardens for Detroit’s unemployed. In Boston in 1895, 52 men and two women each harvested some 20 to 55 bushels of potatoes on land the Industrial Aid Society for the Prevention of Pauperism secured, Warner wrote. Similar efforts were restarted during the Great Depression — relief gardens, thrift gardens.

Unlike the victory gardens of World Wars I and II, these gardens are little known today. Poverty is light on propaganda, heavy on potatoes.

Many temporary gardens — glorified and not — simply vanished after the time of need. Not on the Fens, where gardeners adapted to peacetime, mounting a successful campaign at the mayor’s office and shifting production from food to flowers.

“As far as is known, there is no identical project in this country,” late cofounder Richard D. Parker wrote in a typescript preserved at the Massachusetts Historical Society. “It is indeed an outstanding privilege to have a garden in The Fenway.”

Many of today’s gardeners live nearby, in small homes made even smaller by stay-at-home advisories. Christine Nelson, 34, a pharmacist, told me her victory garden is actually bigger than the Fenway apartment she shares with her husband.

Walking the Victory Gardens’ narrow, wood-chipped lanes is an intimate affair. One peers not into conventional community garden plots, but into the vast outdoor living rooms of the little-apartment people. There are couches and benches and chairs, and lawns as smooth as area rugs. Shiny bric-a-brac catching the thin, early morning sun. A statue of Jizo, the Japanese splinter-removing god. All kinds of things, a vast collection — every gardener’s own mark.

“A lot of people refer to it as a large backyard,” said Gerald Cooper, 77, who is keeping busy building a brick patio in the back of the plot he’s had for more than 20 years.

“I’m there every day, five or six hours at least. Even when there’s rain, I’ll think about going. I usually debate about whether to go down there in the rain or stay in the apartment and clean it up,” he said. “I usually go down there in the rain.”

The gardens are not unchanged. Veterans say there’s a kind of uneasiness now, with old friends and neighbors in masks, 6 feet or more away. Some are converting their plots back to their original purpose.

“Before the pandemic we had a lot of gardeners that were raising perennials, flowers, and some herbs,” said Elizabeth Bertolozzi, Fenway Victory Gardens president. “[Now] people are really determined to do some additional vegetable gardening, because every little bit helps and they’re just concerned that maybe they could put their plots to better use.”

Rick Richter, vice president of the Victory Gardens, is planting an all-vegetable crop for the first time. He’s got 150 tomato plants started in his small apartment.

“I’ve got grow lights all over the place and plants all over,” Richter, 64, explained from home. “It’s going to be a little jungle in here, so I’m really hoping for some warm weather pretty soon.”

The Trustees of Reservations, which manages 56 Boston community gardens (although not the Fenway Victory Gardens, a nonprofit on city land), reports a surge in requests for plots this spring. Applications have doubled. And even in good times, there are not enough plots to meet demand.

“The major role of food access is of course highlighted in this economically insecure time,” said Michelle de Lima, who is the engagement manager for The Trustees’ community gardens. “[But] I don’t think realistically the majority of those people are [gardening] because they have no other way to get food. I think they’re doing it because they’re going a little crazy and they need something positive and hopeful in their lives.”

Zachary Nowak, a historian of urban agriculture and a Harvard College fellow, agreed.

“As far as victory gardens becoming the source of everyone’s food, I don’t know,” he said. “But those people … who just grow flowers and flowering bushes … are giving a much more important gift to the rest of us in the city — and that’s just hope, straight up.”

Scott Zak is one such victory gardener. The 58-year-old Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center nurse grows only flowers in the sunbaked plot he’s had for 25 years: marigolds, zinnias, nasturtiums, and three colors of statice: purple, white, and blue.

He works in the organ transplant unit, so he cannot bring flowers into the hospital, but sometimes he’ll take pictures for his patients.

He said that even in a non-COVID-19 unit, the situation at Beth Israel is very tense.

“It’s horrible. Everything you see on TV is accurate,” he reported. “We were having a meeting among nurses and other staff members — kind of, like, get in touch of how we’re dealing with stress — and the social worker says, ‘Does anyone have any ways of dealing with stress?’ Everyone kind of looked at each other, like, not really, you know, just grin and bear it. And then one of the nurses said, ‘Well, Scott, you have your garden, don’t you?’ ”

Gardens created for war have become a refuge from a new plague and new problems.

“It doesn’t mean to say that you go there and you forget that everything is happening,” explained Marie Fukuda, 54, a victory gardener on the Fens and a project coordinator at Massachusetts General Hospital. “But it’s a reminder that there’s a pace of things that will continue regardless of whether we continue — and although that sounds weird, it’s also very comforting.”

After 24 years, “I can go out there and the same pesky weed that drives me crazy is coming up at around the same time it always does,” Fukuda said.

In springs and summers past, Seth Kilgore, a 64-year-old John Hancock Financial Services employee, could be seen walking from the garden to his South End apartment with a bucketful of fresh-cut flowers: peonies, zinnias, sunflowers.

Daffodils are his favorites, and over the past two decades he’s accumulated a large collection. Many are hand-me-downs from other victory gardeners who have moved out or moved on.

This spring there were flowers, but no gardener.

“We’ve missed the daffodils this year,” Kilgore said. His wife’s at high risk, so he hasn’t been down to his garden at all. “But there’ll be other years.”

Gene Tempest is a Cambridge-based writer and historian. Read more of her work at genetempest.com and get in touch at [email protected].

First Morris County retail cannabis inching closer to reality in downtown Boonton

BOONTON − What could be the first retail shop for recreational marijuana in Morris County is one step closer to opening, and it could open closer to downtown than anyone expected.The town council has scheduled a vote for next Monday on whether to amend the existing ordinance that established the commercial zone for retail cannabis sales off north Mrytle Avenue on the north end of town. Should it pass, that zone would be revised to include a portion of Division Street sitting a few hundred feet from lower Main Stre...

BOONTON − What could be the first retail shop for recreational marijuana in Morris County is one step closer to opening, and it could open closer to downtown than anyone expected.

The town council has scheduled a vote for next Monday on whether to amend the existing ordinance that established the commercial zone for retail cannabis sales off north Mrytle Avenue on the north end of town. Should it pass, that zone would be revised to include a portion of Division Street sitting a few hundred feet from lower Main Street.

The council is considering the action in response to requests from a business holding a preliminary retail cannabis license from the state that has its eye on a specific Division Street property with its own parking lot and a one-story building, formerly occupied by Boonton Electric.

The council voted, 7-1, last year to permit wholesale and retail cannabis sales, and again voted 7-1 "to go forward to look into" a request by Boone Town Provisions at its July 5 meeting. That vote followed a presentation from Boone Town chief legal advisor Justin Singer detailing the company's proposal to open a retail cannabis shop there.

Singer said the company spent six months scouting out potential dispensary locations in the established commercial zone, but could find only two possible properties. One was eventually deemed too small and the other too expensive.

"It's a tight zone," Singer said.

The Boonton Electric property, he said, has been vacant for years and his company is proposing a "significant investment" into making it a "beautiful, state-of-the-art dispensary."

Singer's PowerPoint presentation outlined his 10 years of experience in cannabis sales and involvement in operating more than 20 dispensaries in eight states and Washington, D.C. He also noted Boone Town Provision is "100%" owned by New Jersey residents including his sister-in-law, company founder-president Jamie Singer of Montville.

His presentation also addressed concerns in the area of security, parking and traffic on the narrow road with a mix of commercial and residential properties. He estimated about 200 customer transactions per day and annual sales of $10 million, with 20-26 jobs created.

The council heard some pushback on the proposal from residents during the public session of its Dec. 5 meeting. Some were still opposed to a retail cannabis shop in town. Others worried about loitering and traffic.

"[Retail disensary] TerrAscend on Route 17 in Rochelle Park has a line down Route 17 from 8 a.m. to almost 9 p.m.," Robert Salvo said. "It's not really about cannabis. It's about whether our streets can handle that. You're OK-ing a steady stream of traffic that will not stop."

Mayor Richard Corcoran clarified a maximum of two licenses would be considered for Division Street. The company will still need to formally acquire its retail license and resolution of support from the state and obtain approvals from the zoning board.

New Jersey voters approved legal recreational cannabis use by referendum in 2020, with 67 percent voting in favor. Seventy-one percent of Boonton voters approved the measure, Corcoran said.

Seven towns in Morris County - Boonton, Butler, Dover, Morristown, Rockaway, Rockaway Township and Victory Gardens - have approved retail cannabis sales, but none have yet to see a dispensary approved and opened. Elsewhere around the state, 20 cannabis dispensaries have opened since retail recreational sales began in New Jersey in April.

Talk on NJ women of World War II

@CarolComegnoCAMDEN - A South Jersey author will discuss her book on World War II-era women at a luncheon event March 12 aboard the retired Battleship New Jersey, a museum on the city waterfront.Patricia Chappine of Hammonton, an adjunct professor at Stockton University, is the author of “New Jersey Women in World War II,” which focuses on those on the homefront working in factories making war goods for the country's defense and those who served in the military, planted Victory Gardens and also conser...

@CarolComegno

CAMDEN - A South Jersey author will discuss her book on World War II-era women at a luncheon event March 12 aboard the retired Battleship New Jersey, a museum on the city waterfront.

Patricia Chappine of Hammonton, an adjunct professor at Stockton University, is the author of “New Jersey Women in World War II,” which focuses on those on the homefront working in factories making war goods for the country's defense and those who served in the military, planted Victory Gardens and also conserved at home for the war effort from 1941 to 1945.

It was the contents of a shoebox that sparked her interest in World War II.

"My grandfather was in the war and he had this little shoebox with his patches, medals and currency from various countries that he collected during the war," said 33-year-old Chappine, who also has focused on Holocaust studies at Stockton.

"I was excited at seeing these things as a little girl and later as a woman, it was the women's side of the war that most interested me later. Then I discovered there was never much written about the New Jersey women of World War II."

Among the women highlighted in the book are Pat Witt of Millville, who was in the USO during the war, and pilot Ber-nice "Bee" Falk Haydu, a Monmouth County native, who led the successful effort to win veteran status for members of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP). Local Red Cross volunteers and Girl Scouts in Riverton also are mentioned.

WWII veteran posthumously awarded medals

Chappine recently lectured at the Burlington County Historical Society in Burlington City.

"It's so encouraging to see a younger person so interested in history and World War II," said 75-year-old Elizabeth Carpenter of Mount Laurel, who attended the lecture and remembers her parents Victory Garden of vegetables and making a "V" for victory with her fingers at a victory parade at the war's end when she was five years old.

Paula Rooney of Burlington City came because her late mother worked at the Fleetwings, Inc., aircraft factory in Bristol, Pennsylvania, during the war. "I came to find out more about Rosie the Riveters," she said.

There she met a 91-year-old from Burlington Township who worked at the same plant as a riveter and took a work bus to Bristol from Burlington City as Rooney's mother likely did.

?Saturday's program will begin at 11 a.m. and includes lunch and a tour of the Battleship New Jersey Museum and Memorial.

The cost is $25 per person. Tickets may be purchased at battleshipnewjersey.org or by calling (866) 877-6262, ext. 107.

Carol Comegno: (856) 486-2473; [email protected]

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