HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Washington Township, NJ

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HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Washington Township, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

 Human Growth Hormone Washington Township, NJ

Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Washington Township, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

 Ipamorelin Washington Township, NJ

Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Washington Township, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Washington Township, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Washington Township, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Washington Township, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Washington Township, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Washington Township, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Washington Township, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Washington Township, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Washington Township, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Washington Township, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Washington Township, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Washington Township, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Washington Township, NJ

Inside N.J.’s last Kmart, a depressing bastion of forgotten retail. How long will it last?

Westwood Plaza, a faceless strip mall in Bergen County, is now home to one of New Jersey’s most dubious pieces of retail history.Here lies New Jersey’s last remaining Kmart, a zombified version of the once-omnipresent franchise wading toward its final Blue Light Special. Stowed a few miles off the Garden State Parkway, the lonely store is now one of only three U.S....

Westwood Plaza, a faceless strip mall in Bergen County, is now home to one of New Jersey’s most dubious pieces of retail history.

Here lies New Jersey’s last remaining Kmart, a zombified version of the once-omnipresent franchise wading toward its final Blue Light Special. Stowed a few miles off the Garden State Parkway, the lonely store is now one of only three U.S. locations left standing, after the franchise’s Avenel location shuttered in April amid sweeping closures.

Kmart, which opened its first store in Michigan in 1962 (born from a five-and-dime called Kresge’s founded in 1899), once touted dozens of New Jersey locations among its nearly 2,500 North American stores, peaking in 1994. Nostalgic shoppers may recall spinoffs like Super Kmart, Super Kmart Center and Big Kmart.

The Jersey staple was a cheaper and more convenient retail option than the mall, and Kmart offered a little bit of everything — a one-stop shop for clothing, cleaning supplies, appliances, sports equipment, jewelry and more. And if you got hungry from all that perusing, a hot dog or bag of popcorn was ready in the cafe.

“They would have everything you needed,” said Adele, a resident of nearby Piermont, N.Y. who still makes the trip across the state line to visit the Westwood Kmart. “Household items, accessories, toys, kids things. Bicycles, there was a whole line that you could select from.”

But during our visit last week, the lingering big box store was almost empty — more of a derelict, fluorescently lit portal to the past than a functional shopping experience. Shelves were sparse or altogether barren, loosely stocked with Trapper Keepers, above-ground pools and Valentine’s Day cards (it’s June). One corner of the store was completely bereft of merchandise, blocked off to customers by a barricade of shelves. Elsewhere, Adele’s line of bikes was reduced to a dwindling few on an otherwise bare wall.

Yet one aisle remained full: The DVD section, a format made obsolete by the internet — just like Kmart. Posters for movies and TV shows that have since been replaced by sequels and new seasons were still on display: Season 3 of “Stranger Things,” and “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” both of which were released in 2019.

Only a handful of staff members remain employed at the Westwood location (none were made available to talk to NJ Advance Media), yet they nearly outnumbered the paltry few customers who lurked in the aisles.

When asked if the final Jersey store, first opened in 1982, has plans to close, the store’s manager declined comment and directed NJ Advance Media to contact their corporate office, operated by Illinois-based parent company Transformco, which was not reachable for comment.

But let’s be real — it doesn’t look good.

Washington Township resident Rosanne used to shop at the Kmart in Paramus, which closed in 2014, before she started taking trips to the Westwood store. She’d bring her grandchildren here while babysitting, “just to waste time.” She still finds herself shopping there for herself now. On this day, she was simply looking for a broom.

“I can’t say it’s nostalgic. But it’s convenient,” Rosanne said. “It was around when my kids were little. So you know, it’s been around for a long time.”

She noted that the store’s selection was somehow even more meager just a few months ago, and worse still during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic — less stock was difficult to imagine.

“I hope it stays here,” Rosanne said. “Or, maybe a Walmart.”

While Kmart was never as dominant as Walmart — the Arkansas-based chain has more than 10,000 stores worldwide — it certainly held its own in the battle for New Jersey shoppers’ business through the end of the 20th Century.

Then came a financial crisis and bankruptcy in 2002 along with the closure of hundreds of stores as the company’s CEO was sued by the SEC for misleading shareholders. Sales continued to dwindle, and 326 more locations were shuttered the next year. As Target, Walmart and online shopping became more dominant, Kmart withered. The chain’s biggest impact on New Jersey in recent years was at the West Orange shop, which closed in 2020 and became a COVID-19 vaccine center for Essex County.

When reached by NJ Advance Media, Kmart declined comment on the remaining stores’ profitability or the future of the company.

Could Kmart keep on limping along, with only this lowly trio of brick-and-mortar locations as other shoppers presumably buy online? Perhaps, but judging by how little upkeep was being provided to the Westwood store, imminent closure seems far more likely.

Aiden Martin, a 19-year-old from Hillsdale, used to come to the Westwood Kmart all the time as a kid. He and friends would play hide-and-seek throughout the stores well-stocked aisles and build forts out of toilet paper, seeing if they could stay hidden even after the store had closed.

“There used to be couches everywhere. It’s kind of all gone. Gone with the times, I guess,” Martin said. “It takes a little bit of fun out of my childhood memories to see it completely dead now with nothing. Everything’s cheap. But it’s just like everything’s gone.”

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Jeremy Schneider may be reached at [email protected] and followed on Twitter at @J_Schneider and on Instagram at @JeremyIsHungryAgain.

3-star DB Jason Duclona becomes 4th Florida recruit to pick Rutgers this cycle

Greg Schiano just added his fourth Florida recruit to his 2023 class when three-star Estero (Fla.) defensive back Jason Duclona picked the Scarlet Knights, two days after his Rutgers ...

Greg Schiano just added his fourth Florida recruit to his 2023 class when three-star Estero (Fla.) defensive back Jason Duclona picked the Scarlet Knights, two days after his Rutgers official visit concluded.

Duclona announced his decision publicly on social media Tuesday morning.

A 6-1, 175-pounder, Duclona plays in Lee County, one of the best places to live in Florida. Yet, it’s his tenacity and grit, along with his twitch, that makes him one of Rutgers’ top DB targets in this class.

The cornerback-slash-free safety-slash-wide receiver boasts electric speed and good instincts leading to 31 tackles, six pass break-ups and two interceptions last fall. He also caught 30 passes for 576 yards and six scores.

Duclona projects as a cover corner in college, where he can neutralize big receivers with his length and smaller ones with his speed. He will step up and set the edge, forcing the action back inside or making tackles along the end-line.

He’s a lockdown corner on the gridiron, who moonlights as a basketball star and explosive triple- and long-jumper throughout the offseason.

Rutgers, which recruited Duclona for 18 months, served as his first and last official trek. He cancelled his trip to Illinois the following weekend, foreshadowing his pick.

Duclona picked Rutgers over 27 schools, including Illinois, Boston College, Duke, Louisville, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Northwestern, Ole Miss, Vanderbilt, Washington State, West Virginia, USF, UConn, Temple and others.

Duclona is the fifth official visitor from last weekend to pick Rutgers. The 2023 class now boasts 14 commitments and is ranked No. 38 in the country per 247Sports.

MORE FROM TODDERICK HUNT

Meet the 2021 NJ.com All-College Football team, featuring top players across the country who come from New Jersey

Presenting the NJ.com Top 50, Jan. 2022, a list of New Jersey’s top high school football recruits (regardless of grade)

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New sex ed standards are coming to N.J. schools this fall. Here’s how some districts are preparing.

Any child whose parent objects to any part of a school’s instruction can be excused from the lesson.After nearly 30 years in the classroom, Deptford High School health teacher Deborah Shoemaker has learned how to deftly handle potentially sensitive questions from her students about sex education.Shoemaker gently sidesteps, and says: “Good question. Go home and ask your parents.”While districts across New Jersey are struggling how to implement controversial sex education rules from the state Department o...

Any child whose parent objects to any part of a school’s instruction can be excused from the lesson.

After nearly 30 years in the classroom, Deptford High School health teacher Deborah Shoemaker has learned how to deftly handle potentially sensitive questions from her students about sex education.

Shoemaker gently sidesteps, and says: “Good question. Go home and ask your parents.”

While districts across New Jersey are struggling how to implement controversial sex education rules from the state Department of Education that, after a two-year delay, take effect in September, Shoemaker and other teachers in the Gloucester County school system have been presenting lessons to meet the Comprehensive Health and Physical Education standards since their adoption in 2020. For the past two years, the district says it has found a comfort level in presenting issues that are developmentally and age appropriate.

For second-graders, for example, students learn about gender stereotypes in a lesson that explains that they could pursue any interest, such as math or science, regardless of gender.

”We’re teaching the topics and standards we think students should know,” said Kevin M. Kanauss, the district’s chief academic officer. “We want to keep it to science as much as we can.”

In the meantime, school officials had been making presentations at school board meetings and fielding questions from parents and community members on how they will tackle revising the curriculum, and many have promised to post the curriculum on their school websites with dates that sensitive topics will be taught to give parents ample time to opt out.

Three guidelines outlining what schools should teach students by the end of second, fifth, and eighth grades have prompted the biggest outcry from some parents and educators. The most controversial concepts revolve around lessons that discuss gender identity by the end of second grade; puberty and masturbation by the end of fifth grade; and understanding types of intercourse (anal, oral, etc.) by eighth grade.

In a recent letter to parents, Moorestown School Superintendent Michael J. Volpe explained how his district would interpret the most controversial standards. Eighth graders will get a lesson on making healthy decisions about sex “in the same way that students learn that ‘ocular’ means having to do with the eye.”

”To be clear, there has never been and will not be explicit instructions about sexual acts,” Volpe wrote. “The definitions will not be covered in other lessons.”

Because the performance expectations from the state are “suggestions” and not requirements, some districts have no intention to address them. In North Jersey, the Garwood school board in Union County voted to reject the standards. Moorestown schools will not discuss “romantic and sexual feelings or masturbation,” Volpe wrote. Districts will be regularly evaluated by the state to determine if their curriculum aligns with the standards.

Some lawmakers and parents, and even state Board of Education members, have called for postponing the new standards to allow the state more time to review them and schools more time to develop lesson plans. But the state board said it was not authorized to delay, and schools must comply with the standards for the 2022-2023 school year.

The issue went viral and sparked heated debate among lawmakers in Trenton and during school board meetings this spring. Some people who oppose the standards believe they are too explicit, and prefer such sensitive subjects should be taught at home. The secretary of Catholic education for the Camden Diocese sent a letter to parents in South Jersey informing them how to opt out of the health instructions.

The state Department of Education has said students should be given age-appropriate information for their physical and emotional well-being, saying children who are unfamiliar with certain sexual acts may not be able to accurately report instances of sexual harm or abuse.

Districts also have the powerto get input from educators and the community. Some local districts, including Cherry Hill, Gloucester Township, Washington Township in Gloucester County, Lawnside, and Wenonah, plan to update their health curriculum this summer.

Cherry Hill School Superintendent Joseph Meloche sought to reassure parents at a recent board meeting that the district “would never put stuff together that’s going to be damaging to children.” The district plans to hire an expert to help revise the curriculum.

“Will it be surprising? Will it be things that kids haven’t heard? Absolutely,” Meloche said. “We have to prepare the kids and get them ready to receive that.”

The Haddonfield school system has hired a consultant to help review the health curriculum and figure out where changes are needed, said Superintendent Charles Klaus.

The curriculum already addresses gender identity in second grade and puberty in fifth grade. The biggest change will be teaching about healthy decisions about sex in the eighth grade instead of 11th grade, he said.

“We are pretty much already doing a lot of this stuff,” Klaus told school board recently. “We can decide what works in our curriculum.”

Gloucester Township school officials are updating their curriculum to teach health ”in a respectful way that honors” the state mandate, but also meet community standards, said Assistant Superintendent Timothy L. Trow. Some teachers are uncomfortable with some of the topics.

“We’re going to try to do it as delicately and quickly as possible,” Trow said.

Deptford is further along than many districts because it began aligning its health curriculum with the new standards for its high school and elementary students when the standards were first released, said Superintendent Arthur E. Dietz. A committee will meet this summer to work on the middle school curriculum, he said.

The curriculum is available online and parents are sent a list of topics, Kanauss of Deptford said. This past year, a handful of parents excused their children from health class for moral or religious reasons, he said.

Dietz, the superintendent, acknowledged that some parents and teachers are uncomfortable with some of the topics, and he sympathizes.

“I would rather teach my own children about these sensitive topics,” he said. “This is very foreign to me.”

Shoemaker, who is retiring this month after 27 years, said she primarily presented lessons at the high school about male and female reproductive systems, STDs, marriage, and parenthood.

“It wasn’t really heavily focused on sex,” Shoemaker said. “Personally, if I had to teach some of this racy staff I would just call out sick.”

$15K Coming To Historic Schooley's Mountain General Store

The historic general store was the latest recipient of a $15,000 check today from the Morris County Small Business Grant Program.LONG VALLEY, NJ — A historic Washington Township business received a $15,000 check from the Morris County Small Business Grant Program today, as the Morris County Board of County Commissioners continues to assist businesses and nonprofits impacted by the pandemic.Schooley's Mountain General Store, one of New Jersey's oldest continuously operating country markets, was visited by Commissioner De...

The historic general store was the latest recipient of a $15,000 check today from the Morris County Small Business Grant Program.

LONG VALLEY, NJ — A historic Washington Township business received a $15,000 check from the Morris County Small Business Grant Program today, as the Morris County Board of County Commissioners continues to assist businesses and nonprofits impacted by the pandemic.

Schooley's Mountain General Store, one of New Jersey's oldest continuously operating country markets, was visited by Commissioner Deputy Director John Krickus and Washington Township Mayor Matt Murello.

The $15,000 grant check was presented to owner Peter Aldrich, who has been running the shop's current incarnation since 2006.

The General Store, which opened around 1830, still houses the area's oldest U.S. Post Office and is steeped in the region's rich history, with visits by past U.S. Presidents such as Ulysses S. Grant, William Henry Harrison and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The General Store, like many others in the county, was closed during the early days of the pandemic due to state lockdown orders, and Aldrich says they have slowly worked to rebuild it.

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"It's absolutely going to help. It's going to help me get back to where I belong, get me back in the right direction and hopefully get the ball rolling again," Aldrich said.

Morris County Commissioners are personally delivering the grant checks to learn more about small business struggles, to see if the grant program can be improved and to spread the word that the program is still open.

The grant program was established by the Morris County Board of County Commissioners using pandemic relief funds provided by the American Rescue Plan Act. The majority of applications awaiting final approval will award each qualified business and nonprofit the maximum grant amount of $15,000.

Schooley's Mountain General Store is located at 250 Schooleys Mountain Rd and is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.

The General Store offers a variety of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. You can check the full menu on their website.

What’s happening in South Jersey this weekend and beyond (June 10-16)

WHAT’S GOING ON? Here is a small sample of area happenings you may want to check out in the coming days.Art/MuseumsONGOINGDEPTFORD “The Art Board,” exhibit of works by nine artists, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. weekdays, through Aug. 31. Deptford Municipal Building, 1011 Cooper St. deptford-nj.org, 609-509-5423.HAMMONTON “Mummer’s Series of Autism,” posters by Nick St. Clair, throug...

WHAT’S GOING ON? Here is a small sample of area happenings you may want to check out in the coming days.

Art/Museums

ONGOING

DEPTFORD “The Art Board,” exhibit of works by nine artists, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. weekdays, through Aug. 31. Deptford Municipal Building, 1011 Cooper St. deptford-nj.org, 609-509-5423.

HAMMONTON “Mummer’s Series of Autism,” posters by Nick St. Clair, through June 28. Noyes Gallery at Kramer Hall, Stockton University, 30 Front St. noyesmuseum.org, 609-626-3420.

MILLVILLE “People, Place, Process — 50 Years of Glassmaking at WheatonArts,” through Dec. 1. “Threads of Time and Wisdom — Chilean Textiles and Horse Hair Miniatures,” visual comparison between traditional textiles of the Chilean Mapuche people and the Guatemalan Maya, through Nov. 13. “Collecting and Connecting — Museum of American Glass Recent Acquisitions,” through Dec. 31. Wheaton Arts and Cultural Center, 1501 Glasstown Road (Route 55). wheatonarts.org, 856-825-6800.

MOORESTOWN Annual Members and Faculty Exhibit, through June 24. Perkins Center for the Arts, 395 Kings Highway. perkinscenter.org, 856-235-6488.

Comedy

JUNE 10

ATLANTIC CITY Nick Swardson, 9 p.m., Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa, Music Box Theater, 1 Borgata Way. $49-$55. theborgata.com, 866-900-4849.

Ron White, 9 p.m., Ocean Casino Resort, Ovation Hall, 500 Boardwalk. $45-$90. theoceanac.com, 866-506-2326.

JUNE 11

ATLANTIC CITY Kathleen Madigan, 9 p.m., Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa, Music Box Theater, 1 Borgata Way. $72-$185. theborgata.com, 866-900-4849.

Tom Cotter, 8 p.m., Resorts Atlantic City, Superstar Theater, 1133 Boardwalk. $20-$25. resortsac.com, 800-336-6378.

Fairs/Festivals

JUNE 10

VOORHEES L.E.A.D. Fest Carnival, food, rides and entertainment hosted by Law Enforcement Against Drugs & Violence, 5-10 p.m., also June 11, 1-10 p.m. Voorhees Town Center, 2120 Voorhees Town Center. $5. theleadfest.com/p/events/voorhees, 203-864-5927.

JUNE 11

GLASSBORO Community Day, games, food, community information, live music and other entertainment, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Glassboro Town Square, North Main Street and Rowan Boulevard. [email protected], 856-881-9230.

WOODSTOWN Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape 41st Annual Pow-Wow, Native American celebration with dancing, drumming and singing, crafts, food, Sunday car show, 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., also June 12, 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Salem County Fairgrounds, 735 Harding Highway (Route 40). $5. nlltribe.com/annual-pow-wow, 856-455-6910.

JUNE 16

GLASSBORO Summer Fest, free outdoor concert, food trucks, beer and wine, storytelling, 5-9 p.m., Glassboro Town Square, North Main Street and Rowan Boulevard. [email protected], 856-881-9230.

Food, Drink & Dining

JUNE 11

CHERRY HILL Third Annual Food Truck Festival, Kamp for Kids Chocolate Pretzels fundraiser for children with autism with music, face painting, vendors, raffles, noon-6 p.m., Cherry Hill Mall, 200 Route 38. cherryhillmall.com, 856-662-7441.

Music

JUNE 10

ATLANTIC CITY Ween, 8 p.m., also June 11, 8 p.m. Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa, Event Center, 1 Borgata Way. $65.75. theborgata.com, 866-900-4849.

Orange Loop Rock Festival, tribute bands Foreigners Journey, Ozzmosis, the Four Horsemen and East Side Steven and the Asbury Jacks, 5-10 p.m., Showboat Hotel Atlantic City, Festival Grounds, 800 Atlantic Ave. $25-$169 with VIP options. icfestival.org, orangelooprockfest.com.

CAPE MAY “A Musical Intermezzo,” Friends of Cape May Music Festival program, 3 p.m., Emlen Physick Estate, 1048 Washington St. $45-$50. capemaymac.org, 609-884-5404.

VINELAND Jingo, Santana tribute, 8 p.m., Landis Theater, 830 E. Landis Ave. $15-$30. thelandistheater.com, 856-794-4100.

JUNE 11

ATLANTIC CITY Neha Kakkar, 8 p.m., Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Etess Arena, 1000 Boardwalk. $45-$250. hardrockhotelatlanticcity.com, 800-736-1420.

Paul Anka, 8 p.m., Ocean Casino Resort, Ovation Hall, 500 Boardwalk. $49-$105. theoceanac.com, 866-506-2326.

Orange Loop Rock Festival, Chevelle, Hinder, Stephen Pearcy, Great White, Slaughter and others, 2-10 p.m., Showboat Hotel Atlantic City, Festival Grounds, 800 Atlantic Ave. $25-$169 with VIP options. icfestival.org, orangelooprockfest.com.

CAMDEN Miranda Lambert, Little Big Town, 7 p.m., Freedom Mortgage Pavilion, 1 Harbour Blvd. $31-$122. livenation.com/venues/14115/bb-t-pavilion, 856-365-1300.

MILLVILLE Jessie’s Girl, “Back to the Eighties” tribute, 8 p.m., Levoy Theatre, 126-130 N. High St. $34-$49. levoy.net, 856-327-6400.

JUNE 12

ATLANTIC CITY Orange Loop Rock Festival, Stone Temple Pilots, Hoobastank, Puddle of Mudd, LA Guns and others, 2-10 p.m., Showboat Hotel Atlantic City, Festival Grounds, 800 Atlantic Ave. $25-$80. icfestival.org, orangelooprockfest.com.

WASHINGTON TWP. Trout Quintet, in-person and live-streamed concert, 3 p.m., Bunker Hill Presbyterian Church, 330 Greentree Road (Route 651) in Sewell. $12-$28. musicatbunkerhill.org, 856-494-6077.

JUNE 14

CAMDEN Train, Jewel, Blues Traveler, 7:30 p.m., Freedom Mortgage Pavilion, 1 Harbour Blvd. $81-$630. livenation.com/venues/14115/bb-t-pavilion, 856-365-1300.

JUNE 16

CAPE MAY Bay Atlantic Symphony, Cape May Music Festival program, 7 p.m., Episcopal Church of the Advent, 612 Franklin St. $20-$30. capemaymac.org, 609-884-5404.

WILDWOOD Barefoot Country Music Fest, more than 40 performances on five stages, including Eric Church, Jason Aldean, Florida Georgia Line and and Cole Swindell, Wildwoods Beach, Pine Avenue. $199-$1,299. WildwoodsNJ.com, bcmfest.com.

Theater

JUNE 10

OAKLYN “The Marvelous Wonderettes,” black box production of musical set at a 1958 high school prom, 8 p.m., also June 11, 8 p.m.; June 12, 2 p.m. Ritz Theatre, 915 Whitehorse Pike. $27. ritztheatreco.org, 856-858-5230.

JUNE 16

HAMMONTON “It’s Not Personal, It’s Drag,” performances by local drag performers, 8 p.m., Eagle Theatre, 208 Vine St. $17-$27. theeagletheatre.com, 609-704-5012.

Other

JUNE 10

ATLANTIC CITY Masters of Illusion, 8 p.m., also June 11, 2 and 8 p.m.; June 14-16, 7 p.m. Harrah’s Atlantic City, Concert Venue, 777 Harrah’s Blvd. $28-$48. harrahsresort.com, 800-242-7727.

GALLOWAY Car Cruise, 5-8 p.m., Historic Smithville/Village Greene, Route 9 and Moss Mill Road in Smithville. historicsmithville.com, 609-748-8999.

GREENWICH Hoagie Sale, Italian, mixed cheese or ham and cheese $6; tuna $7. Pickup or local delivery, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Gibbstown VFW Post 5579, 743 W. Broad St. in Gibbstown. 856-423-9328 or 856-224-1170.

HADDON TWP. “Pride and Progress” Community Night, celebration with local LGBT-friendly vendors and allies, information, games, performances by Iris Spectre, Drag Queen Lip Sync Battles and other attractions, 5-9:30 p.m., Haddon Square, 51 Haddon Ave. haddontwp.com, htpride.com.

WEST DEPTFORD “A Visit With General George G. Meade Grant,” presentation by re-enactor Andy Waskie, 1 p.m., West Deptford Free Public Library, 420 Crown Point Road. Registration required. westdeptford.lib.nj.us, 856-845-5593.

JUNE 11

GALLOWAY GM Auto Show, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Historic Smithville/Village Greene, Route 9 and Moss Mill Road in Smithville. historicsmithville.com, 609-748-8999.

HADDON TWP. Pride Fest, local art, food, live entertainment, children’s crafts, drag queen story hour and other LGBTQ+ friendly events, noon-4 p.m., SoHA Arts Building, 1001 White Horse Pike. sohaartsbuilding.org, htpride.com.

VINELAND 30th “Cruise Down Memory Lane,” vintage and exotic car show, 5-9 p.m., Downtown Vineland, Landis Avenue and the Boulevard. vinelandcity.org, 856-794-8653.

JUNE 12

WOODSTOWN “Underground Railroad Journeys,” free Pilesgrove-Woodstown Historical Society program with “Tubman Travels -- 32 Underground Railroad Journeys on Delmarva” author Jim Duffy, 2 p.m., Woodstown Friends Meetinghouse, 104 N. Main St. 609-313-7534.

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