HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Mount Olive, NJ

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 HRT For Men Mount Olive, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

 Human Growth Hormone Mount Olive, NJ

Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Mount Olive, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

 Ipamorelin Mount Olive, NJ

Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Mount Olive, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Mount Olive, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Mount Olive, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Mount Olive, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Mount Olive, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Mount Olive, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Mount Olive, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Mount Olive, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Mount Olive, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Mount Olive, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Mount Olive, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Mount Olive, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Mount Olive, NJ

Forecasters scale back hurricane season for NJ, nation

This hurricane season may be a tad quieter than initially projected, but it is still likely to be busier than normal, government forecasters and others say.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday trimmed their hurricane season outlook from a 65% chance for above normal activity to 60% and increased the odds of a normal season from 25% to 30% because of uneven se...

This hurricane season may be a tad quieter than initially projected, but it is still likely to be busier than normal, government forecasters and others say.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday trimmed their hurricane season outlook from a 65% chance for above normal activity to 60% and increased the odds of a normal season from 25% to 30% because of uneven sea surface temperature, including a patch of cooler water off Portugal. Parts of the Atlantic are warmer than normal, but the variability had forecasters “backing off on the higher end” of their predictions, said lead hurricane outlook forecaster Matthew Rosencrans.

The weather agency now predicts 14 to 20 named storms instead of its May forecast which was 14 to 21. The predicted number of hurricanes remains the same at six to 10 while those storms that hit major category of at least 111 mph are now forecast to be three to five instead of three to six. The forecast includes the three tropical storms that formed in June and early July, about average for this time of year, but quieter than the last few years.

An average season has 14 named storms with seven becoming hurricanes and three of those being majors, according to NOAA. There were 21 named storms last year, a record 30 in 2020 and 18 in 2019.

“While the tropics have been relatively quiet over the last month, remember that it only takes one landfalling storm to devastate a community. This is especially critical as we head into what the team here anticipates is likely to be a busy peak of the season,” Rosencrans said in a press briefing.

A persistent La Nina — the natural cooling of parts of the Pacific that changes weather worldwide — weak trade winds and some warmer than normal Atlantic water temperatures still point to a busy season, Rosencrans said. But the patches of cool water, with temperatures closer to normal than originally predicted in some places, “could kind of tamp down on activity,” he said.

Colorado State University, which pioneered hurricane season forecasts, also dialed back its predictions for the season compared to what it said in April. The school now predicts 18 named storms, down from 19, with eight becoming hurricanes, down from nine. Colorado State predicts four major hurricanes, same as it forecast in April.

“I don’t think the season is going to be a dud, but it’s taking its sweet time getting going,” said Colorado State University hurricane researcher Phil Klotzbach, head of the school’s forecast team.

Klotzbach said this year with its strong La Nina and nearer to average water temperatures seems similar to 1999, 2000, 2011 and last year, which featured a devastating Hurricane Ida that hit Louisiana and sloshed into the Northeast with heavy rain, causing many deaths in the New York-New Jersey region.

“Hopefully, we’ll have no Idas this year, but the overall environment is very similar,” Klotzbach said.

About 90% of Atlantic storms happen from August on. Hurricane season peaks from mid-August to mid-October with the season ending on Nov. 30.

Do you know your flood risk? FEMA urges NJ residents to act now

Where it can rain, it can flood.That's why on Thursday, the same day that U.S. officials confirmed their prediction of an above-average hurricane season in the Atlantic, the Federal Emergency Management Agency urged New Jersey residents to know their flood risk and obtain the proper protection."People need to quit thinking that it won't happen to them," David Maurstad, senior executive of the National Flood Insurance Program at FEMA, told New Jersey 101.5.Homes in high-risk flood areas with government-backed mo...

Where it can rain, it can flood.

That's why on Thursday, the same day that U.S. officials confirmed their prediction of an above-average hurricane season in the Atlantic, the Federal Emergency Management Agency urged New Jersey residents to know their flood risk and obtain the proper protection.

"People need to quit thinking that it won't happen to them," David Maurstad, senior executive of the National Flood Insurance Program at FEMA, told New Jersey 101.5.

Homes in high-risk flood areas with government-backed mortgages are required to have flood insurance. But beyond that, one's homeowner's or renter's policy typically would not cover damage caused by flooding.

For the most part, flood insurance policies take 30 days to go into effect. The peak months for hurricane development are August, September, October, and November.

"It's important not to wait for that hurricane to develop in the Atlantic," Maurstad said. "If it's approaching, that's too late."

According to FEMA, just one inch of water in a home can cause roughly $25,000 in damage. Last September, the remnants of Hurricane Ida dropped approximately three inches of rain per hour and caused major disaster declarations in several New Jersey counties.

Forty percent of floods occur outside the high-risk flood zone, according to FEMA. About 90% of all U.S. natural disasters involve flooding.

Do you need flood insurance? Take this quiz.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday trimmed their hurricane season outlook from a 65% chance for above-normal activity to a 60% chance. The agency predicts 14 to 20 named storms; that includes a few storms that formed in June and early July.

Dino Flammia is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

What would happen to NJ if we were attacked by nuclear weapons?

We used NUKEMAP by Alex Wellerstein to see what would happen if a nuclear warhead hit New York, Philadelphia, Washington or New Jersey.

The models show what would happen in aerial detonation, meaning the bomb would be set off in the sky, causing considerable damage to structures and people below; or what would happen in a ground detonation, which would have the alarming result of nuclear fallout. The models do not take into account the number of casualties that would result from fallout.

Gallery Credit: Eric Scott

New York City - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt as far away as Newark, Elizabeth, Nutley, Fort Lee and Englewood. Buildings would be damaged or destroyed.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns throughout Jersey City, Union, and Cliffside Park.

It would likely destroy or severely damage Newark Liberty International Airport, the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, George Washington Bridge and the rail tunnels under the Hudson River.

Deaths: 1.6 million

Injuries: 2.9 million

New York City - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would be felt as far away as Jersey City and Ridgefield.

It would likely destroy or severely damage Newark Liberty International Airport, the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, George Washington Bridge and the rail tunnels under the Hudson River.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns in West New York and Fort Lee. Fallout would generally be carried away from New Jersey as far away as New Hampshire.

Deaths: 1.3 million

Injuries: 1.4 million

Philadelphia - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route 1 corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange.

Buildings would be destroyed as far away as Deptford, Voorhees, Riverside and Delanco.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Haddonfield, Cherry Hill, Cinnaminson and Riverton.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading as far away as Middletown and Neptune to the East and Mount Olive to the West.

Deaths: 539,000

Injuries: 845,000

Philadelphia - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would be felt as far away as Cherry Hill, Deptford, Maple Shade and Moorestown.

Buildings would be destroyed from Neptune to Mount Olive.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Trenton, Plainfield, East Orange and Yonkers.

Deaths: 441,000

Injuries: 409,000

Trenton, NJ - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route One corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange and into New York City.

Buildings would be destroyed from Burlington to Coxs Corner, Princeton, Plainsboro and Pennington.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Bordentown to Crosswicks, Lawrence and Ewing.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading across most of Central and North Jersey into New York City and as far as Stamford, Connecticut.

Deaths: 126,000

Trenton, NJ - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would reverberate across the Delaware River to Philadelphia with shockwaves that would reach down to Burlington in the South and Upper Freehold to the East.

Buildings would be destroyed from Mansfield to Crosswicks and Princeton.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Long Branch to Bedminster, Morristown, Spring Valley and Fort Lee.

Deaths: 108,000

New Brunswick - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route One corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange and into New York City.

Rutgers University, SoFi Stadium and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from, Kingston to Marlboro, South Amboy, Woodbridge, Plainfield and Somerville.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Kendal Park to Spotswood, Metuchen, South Plainfield and Millstone.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading across most of Central and North Jersey into New York City and as far as Stamford, CT.

Deaths: 140,000

New Brunswick - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would reverberate across the Delaware River to Philadelphia with shockwaves that would reach down to Burlington in the South and Upper Freehold to the East.

Rutgers University, SoFi Stadium and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from Spotswood to Millstone, Bound Brook, South Plainfield and Spotswood.

Thermal radiation would cause 3rd degree burns from Franklin Park to Woodbridge, East Brunswick, Sayreville and South Bound Brook.

Fallout would carry Northeast as far away as Elizabeth, Newark, New York City and Nashua, New Hampshire.

Deaths: 108,000

Atlantic City, NJ - Aerial Detonation

While a nuclear blast in Atlantic City would spare most of inland New Jersey, it would destroy the barrier islands from Long Port to Toms River.

The casinos would fall, the boardwalks would burn and the sand would be contaminated for a generation. Atlantic City International Airport would be leveled.

Buildings would be destroyed from Pleasantville to Margate and Brigantine.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Linwood to Galloway and Longport.

Deaths: 57,000

Atlantic City, NJ - Ground Impact with fallout

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Longport to Barnegat Light.

Fallout would drift mostly out to sea, but would hit the Eastern half of Long Island up to Rhode Island.

Deaths: 57,000

Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ - Aerial Detonation

While New Jersey does have a handful of military targets, the primary target is likely the Joint Base.

If a nuclear missle were to detonate over the base, the entire facility would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from Mount Holly to Manchester Township, Bordentown, Allentown and Red Valley.

Thermal radiation would cause third degree burns from Pemberton to Plumsted and Chesterfield.

Deaths: 14,000

Buildings would be destroyed from Pemberton to Georgetown and Plumsted.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Whitesbog to Georgetown and Arneytown.

Fallout would carry Northwest through Millstone, Freehold, Holmdel and Highlands and stretch all the way to Massachusetts.

Deaths: 9,000

Injuries: 14,000

Washington, DC - Aerial Detonation

The entire DC area would be reduced to rubble, including the White House, Congress, Pentagon and monuments. Andrews Air Force Base, Annapolis and Arlington National Cemetery would be destroyed.

Deaths: 505,000

Washington, DC - Ground Impact with fallout

The entire DC area would be reduced to rubble and buildings would be destroyed from Alexandria, Virginia, to Silver Spring and Bethesda, Maryland.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns up to six miles from ground zero.

Fallout would carry Northwest through Baltimore, Philadelphia into Trenton and as far as the Northern New Jersey border.

Deaths: 415,000

Injuries: 381,000

New State Brewery Restrictions Challenged By Long Valley Officials

The Washington Township Committee will discuss their opposition to new state restrictions on breweries on Aug. 10.LONG VALLEY, NJ — The Washington Township Committee plans to discuss a resolution opposing the New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control's special conditions on breweries during its committee work session on Aug. 10.The New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) issued new rules, which went into effect last month, that significantly limit activities on the premises of microbreweries. As ...

The Washington Township Committee will discuss their opposition to new state restrictions on breweries on Aug. 10.

LONG VALLEY, NJ — The Washington Township Committee plans to discuss a resolution opposing the New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control's special conditions on breweries during its committee work session on Aug. 10.

The New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) issued new rules, which went into effect last month, that significantly limit activities on the premises of microbreweries. As a result, the establishments can only hold up to 25 on-site events and 52 private parties per year. Each business can attend up to 12 off-site events.

The regulations are part of a special ruling issued by the ABC in 2019, following a similar, harsher set of rules issued in 2018 that drew immediate criticism from industry leaders and legislators alike.

Long Valley officials plan to review and discuss a possible resolution opposing the state's new restrictions, possibly drawing inspiration from neighboring towns such as Mount Olive, which recently passed their own resolution.

According to the sample resolution, "these new conditions will force local, homegrown small businesses to rethink business models and closely consider which events they should participate in or host, which will reduce their profits and their opportunities to engage in their communities.

Cindy DeRama, the owner of Morris County-based Twin Elephant Brewing, believes that the new restrictions will harm the role of small businesses in their community

"With this special ruling from the ABC, it limits breweries to engage their communities and customers. Being limited to 25 special events includes limiting live music, charity events, local artist pop-ups, etc. Breweries become part of their local communities and support their towns and local businesses and vice versa," DeRama said.

Following an outpouring of frustration and anger from brewery owners, resolutions opposing the new restrictions have sprouted up all over the Garden State

See related:

A majority of the resolutions proposed that the New Jersey governor and state legislature collaborate with breweries to develop fair laws to guide state regulators at the division of beverage control on how to oversee the state's craft beer industry.

According to ABC Director James Graziano, who issued the 2019 special ruling, the rules were designed "to help craft breweries promote their products and build their business while continuing to balance the concerns of other licensees and ensuring compliance with state law."

The new rules prohibit microbreweries from selling food on-site or collaborating with local food vendors. Microbreweries may provide menus from local restaurants, but they cannot have a monopoly on them.

"Breweries don't want to run like restaurants but they do want to help their customers to have access to food to prevent intoxication which is drilled into servers' heads in the training," DeRama said.

The new regulations may have an impact on local businesses like the historic Long Valley Pub and Brewery, which is housed in a stone barn dating back to the 1700s.

The ABC's new restrictions aim to distinguish microbreweries from traditional bars, limiting the full capabilities of small breweries.

The ABC set a limit of 25 special events on-site per calendar year, 52 private parties per year, and 12 special events off-site per year. When live music or DJs are brought into a brewery, the ABC considers it a special event and adds it to the total allotted amount for the year. Though breweries can broadcast special television or media events, such as the Super Bowl, advertising that the television program will be on now qualifies as a special event.

Members of the Washington Township Committee intend to discuss this issue at the Aug. 10 Work Session Meeting, which is set to begin at 7 p.m. Click here to view the full agenda, including a sample resolution.

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Middletown, NJ, schools to defy state on sex-ed classes

The Middletown School District will reportedly adopt an opt-in approach to teaching sex education classes in the Fall.It's a policy that appears to be in direct defiance of the Murphy administration's directives on the controversial new standards.While many districts say they will offer the option to opt children out of sex education classes, in Middletown children will not be allowed to attend the classes unless a parent or guardian expressly, and proactively, allows it.The Middletown Board of Education is expected to a...

The Middletown School District will reportedly adopt an opt-in approach to teaching sex education classes in the Fall.

It's a policy that appears to be in direct defiance of the Murphy administration's directives on the controversial new standards.

While many districts say they will offer the option to opt children out of sex education classes, in Middletown children will not be allowed to attend the classes unless a parent or guardian expressly, and proactively, allows it.

The Middletown Board of Education is expected to approve the new standards later this month, and will then hold a series of informational sessions for parents that will include a questions and answer period.

School officials say they are confident the new policy will satisfy the concerns of parents.

Jessica Alfone, assistant superintendent of curriculum, told Patch their goal was total transparency.

"It is our goal to ensure that our parents/families have comfort and confidence in the content being addressed," Alfone said, "But will also have the ultimate decision-making ability in determining what is best for (their) child."

By telegraphing how they intend to address the new sex education standards, the district is inviting the scrutiny of the New Jersey Department of Education.

If the DOE decides the opt-in approach is in violation of state education policy on this matter, the district could face punishment, including the loss of state aid.

When state Sen. Vin Gopal, D-Monmouth, suggested the new curriculum standards should serve as more of a "guideline," the DOE was harsh in it's response and warned any district not in strict compliance could face sanctions.

The new standards require kids to be taught (at varying grade levels), gender diversity, sexual feelings, masturbation, the definitions of vaginal, oral and anal sex. Many parents have expressed concerns about the age appropriateness of new standards.

In Middletown, the district is gambling the Murphy Administration will not challenge their approach.

Alfone says their policy will be "compliant with state standards, but also wholly age-appropriate for our students at each grade level."

Eric Scott is the senior political director and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

What would happen to NJ if we were attacked by nuclear weapons?

We used NUKEMAP by Alex Wellerstein to see what would happen if a nuclear warhead hit New York, Philadelphia, Washington or New Jersey.

The models show what would happen in aerial detonation, meaning the bomb would be set off in the sky, causing considerable damage to structures and people below; or what would happen in a ground detonation, which would have the alarming result of nuclear fallout. The models do not take into account the number of casualties that would result from fallout.

Gallery Credit: Eric Scott

New York City - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt as far away as Newark, Elizabeth, Nutley, Fort Lee and Englewood. Buildings would be damaged or destroyed.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns throughout Jersey City, Union, and Cliffside Park.

It would likely destroy or severely damage Newark Liberty International Airport, the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, George Washington Bridge and the rail tunnels under the Hudson River.

Deaths: 1.6 million

Injuries: 2.9 million

New York City - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would be felt as far away as Jersey City and Ridgefield.

It would likely destroy or severely damage Newark Liberty International Airport, the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, George Washington Bridge and the rail tunnels under the Hudson River.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns in West New York and Fort Lee. Fallout would generally be carried away from New Jersey as far away as New Hampshire.

Deaths: 1.3 million

Injuries: 1.4 million

Philadelphia - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route 1 corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange.

Buildings would be destroyed as far away as Deptford, Voorhees, Riverside and Delanco.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Haddonfield, Cherry Hill, Cinnaminson and Riverton.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading as far away as Middletown and Neptune to the East and Mount Olive to the West.

Deaths: 539,000

Injuries: 845,000

Philadelphia - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would be felt as far away as Cherry Hill, Deptford, Maple Shade and Moorestown.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Trenton, Plainfield, East Orange and Yonkers.

Deaths: 441,000

Injuries: 409,000

Trenton, NJ - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route One corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange and into New York City.

Buildings would be destroyed from Burlington to Coxs Corner, Princeton, Plainsboro and Pennington.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Bordentown to Crosswicks, Lawrence and Ewing.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading across most of Central and North Jersey into New York City and as far as Stamford, Connecticut.

Deaths: 126,000

Trenton, NJ - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would reverberate across the Delaware River to Philadelphia with shockwaves that would reach down to Burlington in the South and Upper Freehold to the East.

Buildings would be destroyed from Mansfield to Crosswicks and Princeton.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Long Branch to Bedminster, Morristown, Spring Valley and Fort Lee.

Deaths: 108,000

Injuries: 97,000

New Brunswick - Aerial Detonation

The blast would be felt up the Route One corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange and into New York City.

Rutgers University, SoFi Stadium and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from, Kingston to Marlboro, South Amboy, Woodbridge, Plainfield and Somerville.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Kendal Park to Spotswood, Metuchen, South Plainfield and Millstone.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading across most of Central and North Jersey into New York City and as far as Stamford, CT.

Deaths: 140,000

New Brunswick - Ground Impact with fallout

The blast would reverberate across the Delaware River to Philadelphia with shockwaves that would reach down to Burlington in the South and Upper Freehold to the East.

Rutgers University, SoFi Stadium and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from Spotswood to Millstone, Bound Brook, South Plainfield and Spotswood.

Thermal radiation would cause 3rd degree burns from Franklin Park to Woodbridge, East Brunswick, Sayreville and South Bound Brook.

Fallout would carry Northeast as far away as Elizabeth, Newark, New York City and Nashua, New Hampshire.

Deaths: 108,000

Atlantic City, NJ - Aerial Detonation

While a nuclear blast in Atlantic City would spare most of inland New Jersey, it would destroy the barrier islands from Long Port to Toms River.

The casinos would fall, the boardwalks would burn and the sand would be contaminated for a generation. Atlantic City International Airport would be leveled.

Buildings would be destroyed from Pleasantville to Margate and Brigantine.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Linwood to Galloway and Longport.

Deaths: 57,000

Atlantic City, NJ - Ground Impact with fallout

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Longport to Barnegat Light.

Fallout would drift mostly out to sea, but would hit the Eastern half of Long Island up to Rhode Island.

Deaths: 57,000

Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ - Aerial Detonation

While New Jersey does have a handful of military targets, the primary target is likely the Joint Base.

If a nuclear missle were to detonate over the base, the entire facility would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from Mount Holly to Manchester Township, Bordentown, Allentown and Red Valley.

Thermal radiation would cause third degree burns from Pemberton to Plumsted and Chesterfield.

Deaths: 14,000

Buildings would be destroyed from Pemberton to Georgetown and Plumsted.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Whitesbog to Georgetown and Arneytown.

Fallout would carry Northwest through Millstone, Freehold, Holmdel and Highlands and stretch all the way to Massachusetts.

Deaths: 9,000

Washington, DC - Aerial Detonation

The entire DC area would be reduced to rubble, including the White House, Congress, Pentagon and monuments. Andrews Air Force Base, Annapolis and Arlington National Cemetery would be destroyed.

Deaths: 505,000

Washington, DC - Ground Impact with fallout

The entire DC area would be reduced to rubble and buildings would be destroyed from Alexandria, Virginia, to Silver Spring and Bethesda, Maryland.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns up to six miles from ground zero.

Fallout would carry Northwest through Baltimore, Philadelphia into Trenton and as far as the Northern New Jersey border.

Deaths: 415,000

Injuries: 381,000

Eating disorders in NJ teens have been getting worse

A new study confirms eating disorders, especially among New Jersey teens, have worsened significantly during the pandemic.Hospital Association president and CEO Cathy Bennett said the COVID health crisis has had a significant impact “on the mental health, the behavioral health of our youth in New Jersey.”...

A new study confirms eating disorders, especially among New Jersey teens, have worsened significantly during the pandemic.

Hospital Association president and CEO Cathy Bennett said the COVID health crisis has had a significant impact “on the mental health, the behavioral health of our youth in New Jersey.”

The report, from the Hospital Association’s Center for Health Analytics, Research and Transformation, says teen eating disorder hospitalizations increased from 222 in 2019 to 599 last year.

Bennett said in one sense it’s not surprising that eating disorders, which are considered psychiatric disorders, increased dramatically when the pandemic started.

“You had stay-at-home orders, you had lockdowns, closures of schools and you had the elimination of even the recreational programs during this period,” she said.

She noted the isolation that resulted from the health emergency “deprived a lot of our youth and adolescents and young adults of the social support and the adaptive coping strategies that come from those social supports.”

She pointed out that at a time when personal interactions were extremely limited there was a big decrease in organized sports and activities, and that caused significant modifications in eating habits.

“That all led to anxiety and depression, we saw that in our numbers, and as we know those are also precursors that led to an increased risk of developing or worsening eating disorders,” said Bennett.

The most common eating disorders are binge eating; anorexia nervosa, where someone fears gaining weight and will literally starve themselves; and bulimia, where an individual will eat large amounts of food and then will force themselves to vomit it all up because of concerns about body shape and weight.

She said compounding the problem is a shortage of specialists to treat eating disorders in young people.

“I’d say in New Jersey we have a robust mental health system of care but that system got strained during the pandemic.”

She said we need to make sure our health care professionals have additional resources “including telehealth to deliver care, that level of coordination and that level of accessibility is so desperately needed.”

Bennett said it’s vital we meet people where they’re at “and on the terms that they need in order to start addressing their eating disorders and their depressive behaviors, the things that lead to that self-harm.”

According to the report, 9% of New Jersey residents will experience an eating disorder in their lifetime.

David Matthau is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

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