HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Stewartsville, NJ

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 HRT For Men Stewartsville, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

 Human Growth Hormone Stewartsville, NJ

Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Stewartsville, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

 Ipamorelin Stewartsville, NJ

Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Stewartsville, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Stewartsville, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Stewartsville, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Stewartsville, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Stewartsville, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Stewartsville, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Stewartsville, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Stewartsville, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Stewartsville, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Stewartsville, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Stewartsville, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Stewartsville, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Stewartsville, NJ

N.J. weather: Another cold blast on the way. It could be our longest freeze this winter.

The light snow that coated the ground in many areas of New Jersey on Thursday was merely a nuisance. A bigger weather annoyance will be the next blast of Arctic air that will be sweeping across our region Thursday night — and sticking around for several days.We could be in for our longest stretch of near-freezing and sub-freezing days so far this wi...

The light snow that coated the ground in many areas of New Jersey on Thursday was merely a nuisance. A bigger weather annoyance will be the next blast of Arctic air that will be sweeping across our region Thursday night — and sticking around for several days.

We could be in for our longest stretch of near-freezing and sub-freezing days so far this winter.

How cold will it get?

Temperatures will be dropping into the teens across most of New Jersey by late Thursday and into Friday morning, and some areas of Morris, Sussex and Warren counties will see the mercury dip into the single digits, according to the latest forecast from the National Weather Service.

It won’t get much better during the weekend, with temperatures in northern New Jersey expected to be stuck in the upper 20s to near freezing during the day on Saturday and Sunday and in the teens and single digits in the morning. A slight breeze will make it feel as cold as zero or slightly below zero in some northern towns.

Lots of places in South Jersey also will get a blast of frigid temperatures throughout the weekend, with morning lows in the teens and afternoon highs in the low 30s, forecasters predict. And Monday could be almost as cold, before it turns a bit milder on Tuesday as temperatures climb into the 40s.

Big chill

Temperatures on Friday will be running about 15 degrees colder than normal for Jan. 21, according to data from the National Weather Service. Some details:

The good news: We won’t have to worry much about additional snow during the next several days. Forecasters say the bulk of a coastal storm that originally looked like it could bring heavy snow to the Garden State will likely stay far south and east of our region.

As a result, there’s only a slight chance of light snow in southern New Jersey late Friday night into early Saturday, the National Weather Service says. About a half-inch or less is expected to accumulate.

Snowfall totals from Thursday’s storm

Here’s a look at some of the snowfall totals reported by the National Weather Service as of 2 p.m. Thursday:

Current weather radar

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Early voting for November election brings changes to NJ. Here's what to know

New Jersey's upcoming general election will have some differences from past years, as the state is offering in-person early voting.Early voting is set to begin on Oct. 23 and will end on Oct. 31, giving voters a week to head to a polling place and cast their ballot before Election Day on Nov. 2. But if your plan is to vote early and in person, there are some important changes to keep in mind, ...

New Jersey's upcoming general election will have some differences from past years, as the state is offering in-person early voting.

Early voting is set to begin on Oct. 23 and will end on Oct. 31, giving voters a week to head to a polling place and cast their ballot before Election Day on Nov. 2. But if your plan is to vote early and in person, there are some important changes to keep in mind, as the process will slightly differ from traditional Election Day voting.

The machine used for early voting is digital and will remind voters if they don’t make selections in a given category. After making their choices, early voters in some counties will print out their ballots. A security folder will be provided for voters in those counties to take the printed ballot across the room and scan it. After the ballot is scanned, it is considered submitted. Voters who cast their ballot on Nov. 2 will do so on a traditional machine, though in Monmouth County the new machines will also be used on Election Day.

Another change is that paper logs won't be used at polling places. Instead, early voters will check in on digital poll books linked to the poll books at locations throughout the county to combat duplicate votes. The digital books will still be used on Election Day, but will not be linked.

NJ governor:Phil Murphy and Jack Ciattarelli in their last debate — here's what I saw | Charlie Stile

There are multiple early voting locations in each New Jersey county, and those wishing to vote early can do so at any location in their registered county. Those voting on Election Day, though, will have to do so at their normal polling place. Polls will be open on Nov. 2 from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Here is a list of every early voting location in New Jersey. All locations are open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday:

Atlantic County

Bergen County

Burlington County

Camden County

Cape May County

Cumberland County

Essex County

Gloucester County

Hudson County

Hunterdon County

Mercer County

Middlesex County

Monmouth County

Morris County

Ocean County

Passaic County

Salem County

Somerset County

Sussex County

Union County

Warren County (all locations open Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.):

This story has been updated to clarify that the new voting machines required by the state for early voting may differ from county to county, and that the new equipment may also be used on Election Day in certain counties.

Liam Quinn is a breaking news reporter for NorthJersey.com. To get breaking news directly to your inbox, sign up for our newsletter.

N.J. weather: When will the snow stop? Here’s the latest forecast.

The colder air took longer than expected to arrive in New Jersey Thursday morning, so the switch from rain to snow was delayed by a couple of hours. So, how long will it take for the final flakes to fall?Forecasters from the National Weather Service say the light snow has already s...

The colder air took longer than expected to arrive in New Jersey Thursday morning, so the switch from rain to snow was delayed by a couple of hours. So, how long will it take for the final flakes to fall?

Forecasters from the National Weather Service say the light snow has already started to taper off in Sussex and Warren counties as of 10:15 a.m., and the back edge of the snow should move away from the New Jersey Turnpike corridor by around noon.

Areas of South Jersey that are still getting rain because of the warmer temperatures will eventually see the rain turn to snow by lunchtime, with the final snowflakes expected to move off the coast of Atlantic and Cape May counties in the late afternoon, said Dean Iovino, a forecaster from the National Weather Service’s regional office in Mount Holly.

Because of the warmer temperatures that lingered longer than expected, the weather service says snowfall totals in most of the southern half of the state will amount to less than an inch.

As the snow fades away, air temperatures will continue to drop into the low 30s, then into the 20s Thursday night and into the teens by Friday morning.

“It’s not gonna get any warmer than it (already) is today,” Iovino noted.

With a wave of frigid Arctic air sweeping into New Jersey, temperatures will remain cold during the next few days. And light winds will make it feel even worse, with wind-chill readings likely to get below zero overnight Thursday and overnight Friday.

Even though the storm was expected to be a minor one, the morning timing prompted the National Weather Service to issue winter weather advisories in 16 counties, many school districts throughout the northern half of the state called for delayed openings and some schools closed for the day.

Gov. Phil Murphy called for an 11 a.m. delayed opening of state offices, including Motor Vehicle Commission facilities.

The winter weather advisories were scheduled to expire at 11 a.m. in Hunterdon, Morris, Somerset and Warren counties and 1 p.m. in eastern Bergen, northwestern Burlington, Camden, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Mercer, Middlesex, western Monmouth, eastern Passaic, Salem and Union counties.

Preliminary snowfall totals

Here’s a look at some of the snowfall totals reported by the National Weather Service as of 2 p.m. Thursday:

Current weather radar

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3 N.J. bear sightings got attention, but we are actually seeing fewer bears this year

Black bear sightings and damage complaints are down this year, though reports of non-aggressive bears in three North Jersey municipalities on Wednesday drew plenty of attention.It is quite a turnaround from last year, in which encounters and o...

Black bear sightings and damage complaints are down this year, though reports of non-aggressive bears in three North Jersey municipalities on Wednesday drew plenty of attention.

It is quite a turnaround from last year, in which encounters and other incidents involving bears rose significantly.

Through May 21, there were 48 sightings of bears reported to authorities, down from 52 through the same period in 2020, according to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Sightings doubled last year to 349, up from 169 two years ago.

There were only 9 reports of property damage in 2021 as of three weeks ago, down from 22 at that time last year. Property damage reports rose from 43 two years ago to 66 last year.

Even reports of bears rifling through garbage are declining, with 31 through three weeks ago compared to 48 at that point last year.

While the New Jersey DEP notes it is “extremely rare” for a bear to attack a human — only one incident was reported in 2020, and none so far this year — it is helpful to know the do’s and don’ts upon seeing a bear, whether in the woods or in a crowded neighborhood.

Here are the safety tips provided by N.J. DEP on its website.

It is not clear whether the sightings on Wednesday involved one or more bears. The first was spotted near the Westfield Garden State Plaza in Paramus. Sightings were later reported in Teaneck and Bogota.

Bears have been sighted in all 21 counties but are most heavily concentrated in the northwestern part of the state.

New Jersey has held a bear hunt annually every fall since 2020, but Gov. Phil Murphy — who supports exploring non-lethal alternatives — announced last year that it will not take place in 2021.

Bear hunting has been a volatile issue in New Jersey, pitting hunters against animal rights activists. The hunt resumed in New Jersey in 2003 following a moratorium of nearly three decades, instituted after the population neared extinction in the early 1970s.

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N.J. nonprofit helps shape the futures of young adults with special needs

Before joining a small nonprofit organization in Hunterdon County, Tanner Alexander mostly kept to himself.Now, one of his favorite things to do is make new friends.“I got here this past January, and I just like to meet new people,” said Alexander, who is 28 and lives in Washington Township in Warren County. “I’m still learning how to be independent, and how to meet people and be friends with everybody.”Alexander is a member of ...

Before joining a small nonprofit organization in Hunterdon County, Tanner Alexander mostly kept to himself.

Now, one of his favorite things to do is make new friends.

“I got here this past January, and I just like to meet new people,” said Alexander, who is 28 and lives in Washington Township in Warren County. “I’m still learning how to be independent, and how to meet people and be friends with everybody.”

Alexander is a member of StarThrower Group, an organization established in Flemington in 2018 to provide career support, service opportunities and community connections for young adults with special needs.

The main purpose of StarThrower Group is to teach its members, like Alexander, how to gain their independence.

“We’re there to support them through whatever personal or career or educational goals that they have for themselves,” explained Jenni Clark, the organization’s founder and CEO. “My friend once said it’s not about them making a living; it’s about them making a life. And that is really what it is.”

StarThrower Group has implemented a myriad of programs and activities for its approximately 50 members that range from dancing to knitting to educational lessons. These programs help the organization’s members cultivate connections with one another and with the staff, who observe how they interact and learn what their interests are before immediately launching them into a career path.

“So many agencies just say, ‘Oh, well there’s a job pushing carts at ShopRite, let’s go over there.’ Not that that’s a bad job, that’s just not everybody’s career,” Clark said. “And just because they have a disability doesn’t mean they shouldn’t have the opportunity ... to be looking into their careers and their future — not just something that’s keeping them busy.”

“So it’s about shifting the mindset to help people to be able to do that,” she added.

In connecting one of the members with a potential new job, Clark commonly arranges for them to initially “sample” the experience so they don’t run the risk of being hired into a job for which they are not well suited.

“It’s so hard for everybody to overcome (being fired), but it’s even more difficult for people who already have lower self-esteem because of what they’ve already had to endure their whole life, or being told their whole life they can’t do something because they are disabled,” Clark said. “So first we start to get that skill and experience, and then we go and fill out a resume, and go on an interview, and actually get hired.”

However, the organization does not merely equate independence with a new career, but simply with helping its members get to the next step in their lives — regardless of what that next step may be.

“Our goal is their goal,” Clark explained. “I have a couple, we’ve had a serious talk about them getting married and having kids — they want to do that. And I said, ‘OK, we need to get you to that point.’”

Clark’s experience as a mother of an autistic child and as a former teacher in the Workplace Readiness Program at Hunterdon Central Regional High School played a role in inspiring her to establish the nonprofit in 2018.

As a high school teacher, Clark often wondered what the students with special needs would do after they graduated. And as a mother, she knew the options were too limited.

“I did some research and I found some places and I wasn’t really thrilled with what I was finding because the special education population is just stereotyped and generalized into these ridiculous, you’re high-functioning or low-functioning (categories),” Clark said. “And it’s a spectrum for a reason ... and I really wanted to find something that just focused on the individual, but also focused on community and bringing them together.”

Immediately prior to founding StarThrower Group, Clark’s experience as a transition coordinator at a local agency convinced her that it was time to establish the kind of place that could be of better service to people with special needs.

“The clients that I saw working there were longing for connection, and to be included and to feel valued, and they really didn’t have that,” Clark said. “And I said, ‘Alright, that’s it, we’re doing this.’ And I cashed out my pension and I jumped in.”

StarThrower Group is named after a favorite parable of Clark’s that is posted directly on the organization’s website, which tells the story of a boy who throws starfish into the ocean to save their lives.

“When it came time to open this, (the story) came back to me,” Clark said. ““Being a star thrower, each of us is helping somebody one person at a time. And because it’s focused on one-by-one, I think it’s important: because I try to individualize what we’re doing.”

“Everybody is a person, and I can’t just to stereotype and say, ‘Well, this is what worked for this one so this is what’s going to work for you.’ We really focus on trying to get to know everybody,” she added.

This focus on individual attention has remained in place even as the organization shifted all of its programs online in mid-March after the coronavirus pandemic broke out in the state of New Jersey. Clark said StarThrower Group adapted within days of the epidemic sweeping the state in her determination not to abandon any of its members.

“My fear was my friends were going to be home alone again. And the whole point of this was that we have our community,” Clark said. “And I said, ‘Here’s what we’re going to do: we’re going to use the Google platform and Google Meets and create something where they can log in.’”

“It evolved through the year, but we have been online since March 16 with an online daily program, weekdays, where they’re online with us from 10 to 4 and we provide all kinds of workshops,” she added. “And a lot of it is just silliness and fun and communication.”

Keeping within COVID protocols, at present day the organization allows no more than 25 people in its facility at one time. These 25 people often include member Christy Sualang, who Clark said comes in every day and leads Zumba-type classes at the organization.

In response to how often she enjoys orchestrating the dances, Sualang said, “All the time!”

Even as the organization remains at half-capacity, Clark said that the staff continues to welcome new volunteers to lead programs and nurture their own relationships with its many special members.

“They’re not just our clients, or anything like that. They’re a part of our family, and we’re here taking care of each other,” Clark said. “And it’s pretty cool, how it’s worked out. It’s probably the most ridiculously positive and fun place I’ve ever worked at.”

StarThrower Group is also continuing to accept donations from the community, much of which will go towards potentially expanding the organization over the next year or so to make it more accessible to people throughout the state.

“My goal is probably (to open a branch) in Washington Township and Somerset County, where it’s walkable, so perhaps the Raritan area ... just to give those who are coming from South Bound Brook, Manville, Hillsborough a closer destination,” Clark said. “There’s a lot of people out there that are having challenges because of different physical, emotional, developmental delays or disabilities ... if I can do something for any one of them, that’s always a plus.”

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