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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

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Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Lyons, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
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Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Lyons, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Lyons, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Lyons, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Lyons, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

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What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

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Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Lyons, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Lyons, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When there is an increased concentration of growth hormone by the pituitary gland, there are positive benefits to the body. Some benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Lyons, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Lyons, NJ

Last-second FG rallies Randolph to victory over Wayne Valley in NJ football playoffs

Special to DailyRecord.comRANDOLPH — Three years ago, Randolph special teams coach Michael Lyons served up a recruiting pitch that paid dividends for his program much later.The longtime Rams assistant coach reached out to then-soccer player Aidan Flowers and pleaded with him to join the school’s football program.“I told him I needed him, and I knew he would do something great at some time and I guess here it is,” Lyons said. “He’s very valuable to us.”Flower...

Special to DailyRecord.com

RANDOLPH — Three years ago, Randolph special teams coach Michael Lyons served up a recruiting pitch that paid dividends for his program much later.

The longtime Rams assistant coach reached out to then-soccer player Aidan Flowers and pleaded with him to join the school’s football program.

“I told him I needed him, and I knew he would do something great at some time and I guess here it is,” Lyons said. “He’s very valuable to us.”

Flowers, whose brother Jacob played for Randolph until he graduated in 2019, gave it a chance and remained with the program. Since the Rams have attempted about two field goals over the past four years, Flowers has mostly resided in the background.

The senior was thrust into the spotlight, nailing a 30-yard field goal as time expired to rally Randolph past Wayne Valley, 31-28, in a North 2, Group 4 semifinal on Friday night. The second-seeded Rams, who hope to capture their first sectional crown since 2010, face top seed North Hunterdon next week.

“My heart was racing but I was ready for the job,” Flowers said. “Kickers don’t always get their due but I got it today.”

The game came down to three plays from three of Randolph’s more unheralded performers. Facing a fourth-and-4 from the Randolph 38, Wayne Valley (10-1) faked a punt. Punter Alex Scheuplein, who also serves as his team’s quarterback, lofted a pass toward Tyler Smith, but Rams defensive back Kaeson McAll swooped in and deflected the ball out of bounds to give Randolph a final chance to win it.

“I knew they were going to fake so I was waiting for the pass to come to me,” McAll said. “We practice it all the time and I was ready. Luckily I did my part.”

Jake Jenisch served as the team’s next savior. The 6-foot-3 receiver, who didn’t have a catch previously in the game, made a leaping 30-yard grab on third-and-10 to put Randolph at the Indians’ 15. His catch set up Flowers’ dramatic game-winning kick.

“I typically like to go for it on fourth down but Aidan practices those kicks all the time,” said Randolph coach Will Nahan, who will be coaching in his first sectional final. “I had no doubt he was going to make that.”

Courtesy of an effective running attack, the Indians mustered a long drive that put them at the Randolph 35 with a third-and-1 situation. But a costly false start pinned them back. Unable to muster enough yards for the first down on a quarterback run, Wayne Valley opted for the fake punt that led to a turnover on downs late in the fourth quarter.

The game was a contrast to the last meeting between the schools, when Randolph built a 23-point halftime lead before holding on for a 40-25 win last year.

There were a flurry of wild plays, a dozen combined penalties, and three lead changes in the first half, as third-seeded Wayne Valley forced two turnovers via interception for a 21-20 halftime lead Friday. The second interception was more damaging as Chris Jun, who was nursing what appeared to be a lower leg injury earlier in the game, showed no signs of the ailment on a diving grab to the Randolph 45.

Jun provided more theatrics on the next play when he caught a pass from Alex Scheuplein in stride and raced toward the left side of the end zone for the touchdown with 3:35 remaining in the first half. Buoyed by a 49-yard reception by Ryan Novak, Randolph responded with a 5-play, 78-yard drive that was capped by a 1-yard touchdown run by Jesse Wilfong. The extra point try was blocked, preserving the Indians one-point lead.

The teams exchanged touchdowns in the second half as Wayne Valley scored on a 6-yard run by Scheuplein with 10:14 left in the third quarter. Stephen Petruzziello, who had 108 rushing yards and a pair of scores, followed with a 14-yard jaunt with 4:53 remaining in the same period.

What it means

Randolph advances to play North Hunterdon in the North 2, Group 4 championship game. It is the first trip to the sectional final for the Rams since defeating Montclair, 19-10, in the North 1, Group 4 final in 2010. Ironically, Randolph needed a field goal in the second overtime against North Bergen to escape with a 24-21 victory in the sectional semifinal.

“North Hunterdon is the number one seed for a reason,” said Nahan, whose team has won three straight games. “They’re well coached and I’m sure they have some great players.”

Wayne Valley, the champion of the SFC Patriot White, ends its season-long 10-game winning streak. The Indians dropped their second consecutive game against Randolph in the past two seasons.

Key play

There was no bigger play than Flowers’ game-winning field goal with three seconds left to catapult Randolph into the sectional final. Flowers had a kick blocked by Erik Scheuplein earlier in the game but nailed the longer boot to win it.“I move on from my mistakes,” Flowers said. “For the coaches to have the trust in me, I am at a loss for words.”

By the numbers

? The magic number for Wayne Valley was 34. The Indians had registered that amount of points or more in seven of their last eight contests.? The Rams improve their playoff record to 28-21, while Wayne Valley drops to 27-19. Randolph is making its 13th appearance in the sectional title game and aims for its eighth crown.

Game balls

? Alex Scheuplein had 149 of his 157 passing yards in the first half and piled up 171 rushing yards for Wayne Valley. He finished with a pair of passing touchdowns and two more rushing scores in the loss.? Petruzziello had 108 rushing yards and two touchdowns to pace Randolph.

They said it

"I never want to do this. I never want to be in this situation, but I am so excited to get into this championship game.” – Flowers on being called on to attempt the game-winning kick Friday night.

Up next

? Randolph (9-1) travels to North Hunterdon (10-1) winner next week.? Wayne Valley's season (10-1) concludes.

Pillar College Hosts Appreciation Event for Veterans

Pillar College, as proud supporters of the GI Bill®, supports military veterans and their families by offering a special discount to spouses and children of military veteransNEWARK, NJ - Pillar College hosted its first annual Veterans' Luncheon Meet and Greet in the Crystal Ballroom at the Robert Treat Hotel Wednesday afternoon.Veterans came from near and far to attend the buffet-style luncheon and hear students, faculty and ...

Pillar College, as proud supporters of the GI Bill®, supports military veterans and their families by offering a special discount to spouses and children of military veterans

NEWARK, NJ - Pillar College hosted its first annual Veterans' Luncheon Meet and Greet in the Crystal Ballroom at the Robert Treat Hotel Wednesday afternoon.

Veterans came from near and far to attend the buffet-style luncheon and hear students, faculty and staff give testimonials, speeches, and prayers for attending guests.

The picturesque setting included a red carpet in a room decorated with American flags under a grand chandelier with red, white and blue lights. The event began with a prayer and a moment of silence.

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"This is just the start," Pillar College President Dr. Rupert A. Hayles, Jr., a 20-year veteran of the United States Air Force, said. "I expect this event to get bigger and bigger, because we want to make sure we honor as many veterans as we possibly can every single year."

Also speaking at the luncheon, Pillar College Chair of Psychology and Counseling, Dr. Maxine Bradshaw, provided information and resources regarding mental health.

Student Chezvaugh Turner, who serves in the United States Navy, spoke about her educational journey and how she sees Pillar College not only as an educational institution, but also as a family. "My testimony here at Pillar is a beneficial one because they have a cohort system that functioned as a family when I needed it," Turner said.

"Pillar has a system that supported me when I was experiencing depression, PTSD, anxiety and isolation. They surrounded me and they are still moving with me as a family. Staff members are willing to be there and they are accountable to us when we have grievances,” she said. “This is something that is not found in every college. What we have here at Pillar College is a blessing."

Pillar College Vice President of Academic Advancement Dr. Ralph T. Grant described how staff members at Pillar differentiate themselves from instructors at other colleges: "Most colleges and universities have loads of teachers," Grant said. "But at Pillar, you will not find a ‘teacher’ on staff. Instead, faculty here have traded-in their teacher certificates for educator certificates.”

“A teacher is like a politician,” Grant explained. “One is looking forward to the next semester, the other to the next election. But the educator looks ahead to the next generation. At Pillar College, you will find that educators in the classroom are preparing you for the next leg of your journey."

During his President's message, Dr. Hayles also said that Pillar College educates its students both academically and spiritually. "We have a Windmills of Change vision that focuses on providing practical degrees and concentrations" he said. "But at the same time, we ensure that all graduates leave here with a strong spiritual foundation.”

“Whether their degrees are in organizational leadership; psychology and counseling; business administration; intercultural communication; supply chain management; or project management: We want to make sure that students in all disciplines have this spiritual foundation when they leave this institution to go out and change the world," Hayles said.

Pillar College Associate Vice President Dr. Dominic DiGioacchino provided additional information on the unique structure of Pillar College, which is New Jersey's only fully-accredited, Christ-centered, and Bible-based Christian college. DiGioacchino described the various degrees offered at the school, while emphasizing the flexibility, small classroom sizes, cohort modality, and cost-conscious policies that typify Pillar College.

"We're licensed by the state of New Jersey and we are approved for military veterans’ benefits," DiGioacchino said. "Pillar College offers veterans who are not receiving veterans’ benefits a 20 percent discount. We're also offering that same 20 percent discount to their spouses and their children."

Keynote speaker Hector Cruz, who is a Pillar College graduate and an All Marine Corps Hall of Fame boxing champion, stepped on stage to a standing ovation and a familiar battle cry of "Ooh-rah" from an audience that included fellow Marines who traveled from as far as Minnesota to hear him speak. Cruz has earned two bachelor's degrees and two master's degrees from Pillar College.

Cruz spoke candidly about his life's struggles that brought him from contemplating suicide to finding his path to spirituality and achievement through higher education. "Pillar College is not just here to enroll you," Cruz said. "Pillar is here to guide you, from beginning to end. When we see you walk across the stage at graduation, we can honestly say ‘Mission Accomplished’."

To learn more about Pillar College, please go to: www.pullar.edu. To learn more about Pillar College's military benefits TAP here.

President of Pillar College Dr. Rupert A. Hayles, Jr. introduces the Veteran's Initiative

About Pillar College:

Pillar College offers bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees and special programs like BLEND, an associate’s degree for Spanish speaking students. It also offers the LEAD degree (Life Enhancing Accelerated Degree) in an accelerated bachelor’s degree program for students who already have some college credits and/or prior learning assessments (PLA). Also, a DEED program (Dual Enrollment Education Degree) is available for high school students, who can earn up to 30 college credits while obtaining their high school diploma.

Editor's Note: This advertorial content is being published by TAPinto.net as a service for its marketing partners. For more information about how to market your business on TAPinto, please email [email protected]

Gov. Murphy, runaway healthcare prices are devastating residents. N.J. needs price transparency. | Opinion

By Kevin Lyons, Christin Deacon, and Cynthia A. FisherNew Jersey state officials have sided with hospitals and health insurers over workers and taxpayers. On Wednesday, the State Health Benefits Commission voted to raise health premiums for hundreds of thousands of state and local workers by approximately 20%. The hike comes over the objections of state employees and ...

By Kevin Lyons, Christin Deacon, and Cynthia A. Fisher

New Jersey state officials have sided with hospitals and health insurers over workers and taxpayers. On Wednesday, the State Health Benefits Commission voted to raise health premiums for hundreds of thousands of state and local workers by approximately 20%. The hike comes over the objections of state employees and unions who rallied at the state house in Trenton on Tuesday against the move.

This Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield state plan premium increase will reduce public worker pay by around $1,500 to $1,800 annually. Police officers will pay up to $2,500 more for family coverage. Taxpayers, who cover part of public sector workers’ premiums, may face even higher property tax bills as a result.

This significant financial hardship comes at the worst possible time as high inflation stretches paychecks to their limit. On Tuesday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced consumer prices rose 8.3% over the last year, hovering near a 40-year high.

State officials now have a responsibility to fight back against hospital and health insurance profiteering off ordinary workers. They can reverse runaway healthcare costs burdening New Jersey healthcare consumers by implementing price transparency measures such as those that saved Montana’s state health plan from insolvency.

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How can health premiums rise approximately 2.5 times the current historic inflation rate? Because healthcare prices are hidden from consumers, allowing hospitals and health insurers to overcharge without consequences. Workers generally have no idea what they’ll pay for healthcare until after they receive bills in the mail or see their premiums skyrocket. This opaque dynamic is like buying a car and not knowing what your payments will be until six months later.

State workers have their salaries and pensions posted publicly online. Yet healthcare prices aren’t similarly transparent despite recent federal rules requiring hospitals and health insurers to publish their actual negotiated rates. Price information requests to the State Health Benefits Plan Design Committee over the last 10 years have been met with delays, refusals and redactions.

State officials can require health plans to include robust price transparency disclosures that allow workers, unions, and state agencies to identify the highest quality care at the lowest possible price. Actual, upfront prices can empower Garden State healthcare consumers to reduce their healthcare costs through choice and competition and get the care they need at prices they can afford. Employers and unions can steer their employees and members away from price-gouging providers to quality, less expensive alternatives within the well-documented wide range of prices for the same care. They can share the ensuing savings with workers in the form of higher pay.

The state can follow the successful price transparency measures enacted by Montana in 2014. The Treasure State rescued its state health plan from imminent insolvency and saved $121 million in three years over what actuaries projected by analyzing its health claims data, avoiding overcharging, and paying hospitals a multiple of the Medicare rate for the same care. This reference model pays Montana hospitals an average of 234% of the Medicare price for state workers’ care.

Such a price ceiling can generate significant care and coverage savings for New Jersey public workers who routinely pay three, four or five times the Medicare rate while still allowing hospitals to earn a fair profit. Unfortunately, Gov. Phil Murphy’s appointees to the plan design committee voted against a resolution to even study such a model. This acceptance of the failing status quo is offensive.

State leaders, unions, workers, taxpayers and all Garden State healthcare consumers can no longer put up with runaway healthcare prices that financially devastate residents. Meaningful price transparency reforms such as reference pricing can empower hardworking Americans to stand up to hospital and health insurers’ predatory pricing practices. Healthcare consumers acting in solidarity have the power to end healthcare price gouging and usher in an affordable healthcare system.

Kevin Lyons is the director of Member Benefits at the New Jersey State Policemen’s Benevolent Association. Christin Deacon is the former director of Health Benefits Operations and Policy and Planning for New Jersey. Cynthia A. Fisher is the founder and chairman of PatientRightsAdvocate.org.

Here’s how to submit an op-ed or Letter to the Editor. Bookmark NJ.com/Opinion. Follow us on Twitter @NJ_Opinion and on Facebook at NJ.com Opinion. Get the latest news updates right in your inbox. Subscribe to NJ.com’s newsletters.

Animal Hospital To Open In Summit, Launched By Union County Couple

SUMMIT, NJ — Evin and Rick Lyons first met while interning at the Veterinary Emergency and Referral Group in Brooklyn one year after graduating from college. Now, seven years later, the couple is launching their own animal hospital right in Summit.Lyons Veterinary Hospital is set to open across from Huntley Taverne on Morris Ave. where Joe's Pizza used to be, according to owner Evin Lyons.Evin said the hospital, which will exclusively see dogs and cats, will likely open sometime between late November and early December of...

SUMMIT, NJ — Evin and Rick Lyons first met while interning at the Veterinary Emergency and Referral Group in Brooklyn one year after graduating from college. Now, seven years later, the couple is launching their own animal hospital right in Summit.

Lyons Veterinary Hospital is set to open across from Huntley Taverne on Morris Ave. where Joe's Pizza used to be, according to owner Evin Lyons.

Evin said the hospital, which will exclusively see dogs and cats, will likely open sometime between late November and early December of this year.

Evin and Rick moved to Springfield in 2018 right before they got married, and Evin said they fell in love with the surrounding area.

"Both of us have worked as relief vets all around New Jersey, including locally, and we felt that there was a need for additional veterinary care," Evin told Patch. "We are excited to be so close to home!"

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Both Evin and Rick graduated from veterinary school in 2014 — Evin from Cornell University and Rick from the University of Pennsylvania.

After dating for a few years, the duo moved to New Jersey in 2017. Since then, they have both worked at practices in New York and New Jersey.

They also have two furry friends of their own — a 13-year-old dachshund named Pringles and a 12-year-old one-eyed and no-toothed cat named Lira.

Evin said Lyons Veterinary Hospital will offer well and sick visits for dogs and cats, as well as conduct labwork and X-rays with "state-of-the-art technology."

Surgical services such as a spays, neuters and mass removals will also be offered. In addition, Evin said she and her husband have a lot of experience in dentistry and will offer dental cleanings with full dental X-rays, as well as oral surgery for cats and dogs.

A veterinary behaviorist will also be available to see pets experiencing behavioral issues.

"We are looking to create a unique animal hospital where our clients and patients always feel welcome," Evin said. "We plan on having a space that is aesthetically beautiful and comfortable."

She said Lyons will also offer an app that will allow clients to access their pet's records, request medication refills and reach out to the medical team.

The hospital will practice "Fear-Free medicine" — a low-stress handling, making sure all patients are as stress-free as possible when they come to the hospital, Evin said.

Fun community events like kitten yoga and "yappy hours" will also occur monthly at the hospital. Evin said she hopes to partner with local businesses in the venture.

Lastly, Evin said the hospital will work with local rescues to host adoption events.

You can learn more about the business on their website, as well as follow them on Instagram @thelyonsvet and Facebook.

Have a news tip? Email [email protected]

Jersey City school board approves nearly $1 billion budget in close vote

The Jersey City Board of Education finalized its $974 million budget for the 2022-23 school year Thursday night, capping off months of debate about the balance between fiscal responsibility and the district’s responsibilities to its students.In the immediate aftermath, board members seem more eager to put the experience behind them than to discuss their vote.The 5-4 vote broke ...

The Jersey City Board of Education finalized its $974 million budget for the 2022-23 school year Thursday night, capping off months of debate about the balance between fiscal responsibility and the district’s responsibilities to its students.

In the immediate aftermath, board members seem more eager to put the experience behind them than to discuss their vote.

The 5-4 vote broke along the same lines as the vote for initial approval in March. President Gerry Lyons, Vice President Gina Verdibello, and trustees Noemi Velazquez, Paula Jones-Watson, and Lorenzo Richardson voted to approve.

Vice President Natalia Ioffe and trustees Alexander Hamilton, Younass Barkouch, and LeKendrick Shaw voted against the budget.

The budget is more than a 15% increase from last year’s budget and will raise school taxes on the average Jersey City homeowner next year by $1,600. The increase comes one year after a nearly $1,000 school tax increase for property owners. Even with the tax increases, Jersey City residents still pay less in school taxes than the average New Jersey homeowner.

Mayor Steven Fulop and others have criticized the board for being too willing to raise taxes, but the board and its supporters have maintained that the increased tax levy is the only way to make up for an ongoing slashing of state school aid to Jersey City. The district was put on a seven-year austerity plan in 2018 when the state revised its funding formula.

But despite the high-profile public debate around the budget, board members have mostly stayed quiet about the deliberations behind the final vote. The board went into closed session prior to the vote and none of the trustees commented Friday.

Lyons said he does not speak to the press, claiming that he has been misquoted in the past. He did not respond to a request for a written response, either. Velazquez, approached at the district teachers’ awards ceremony Friday, also decline to comment.

After the vote, Ioffe said she hopes next year’s budgeting process begins earlier to avoid the level of “unpleasant surprise” experienced this year, though she did not elaborate. She also compared this year’s budget documents unfavorably with budget documents the board used during the 2018-19 school year, which she said had more detail and easily understood information.

“Even a layman can take a look and see how the district’s money is being spent,” Ioffe said of the 2018 budgeting documents, “and I think something like that is so important with regard to transparency and the education process for trustees.”

Richardson, who voted for the budget, took a conciliatory tone after the vote, agreeing partially with Ioffe’s proposals.

“Having the data that was a little more detailed previously I think maybe would be helpful so you can see where the money is going and how it’s going to assist the children,” he said.

Last year Jersey City used COVID-19 relief funding in the municipal portion of the property tax to offset the increase in school taxes, but city official have said they won’t be doing that again this year. Property taxes are a combination of municipal tax, school tax and county tax.

Superintendent Norma Fernandez voiced her support for the budget, noting that 77% of the cost is tied up in benefits, wages, and insurance, items that increase in cost every year. She also noted 20 of the school district’s 46 buildings are more than 100 years old and need significant care.

Both Fernandez and Business Administrator Regina Robinson warned the board that the cuts in state aid that this year’s budget had to plug are only going to get worse. According to Fernandez the district lost about $68 million in state aid in this budget from last year.

Robinson said there is still $149 million from the state in this year’s budget that will likely fall to zero in the next few years.

“We must make some concessions and reach a consensus, because we will face even more significant shortfalls next year,” Fernandez said.

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