HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Silver Lake, NJ

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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

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Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Silver Lake, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

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Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Silver Lake, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Silver Lake, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Silver Lake, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Silver Lake, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

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Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Silver Lake, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Silver Lake, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Silver Lake, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Silver Lake, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Silver Lake, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Silver Lake, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Silver Lake, NJ

NJ drought 101: The truth about 3 dry weather impacts

Over the past few weeks, it has become more and more apparent that New Jersey's extended stretch of unusually dry weather is starting to take its toll.Earlier this week, I ran through all the latest numbers in a special drought update. As of this writing, 12% of New Jersey is officially classified in "Moderate Drought," with an additional 57% of the state's area designated as "Abnormally Dry...

Over the past few weeks, it has become more and more apparent that New Jersey's extended stretch of unusually dry weather is starting to take its toll.

Earlier this week, I ran through all the latest numbers in a special drought update. As of this writing, 12% of New Jersey is officially classified in "Moderate Drought," with an additional 57% of the state's area designated as "Abnormally Dry".

The bottom line: There's no need to panic just yet, but we are teetering on the edge of drought impacts.

This article does not go into much detail about our current scenario. Instead, I want to focus on some "what ifs" — largely looking at worst-case scenarios. It is important to note that drought is usually a long-term spiral — more of a "climate event" than a "weather event". However, these impacts can arrive suddenly, and the effects can vary in severity by specific location.

So let's do it. The traditional trio of precarious drought impacts are: Water, Fire, and Earth.

When the weather dries up, 9 million New Jerseyans get thirsty in a hurry.

OK, that is incredibly overdramatic. But when drought is imminent, many immediately think of water levels and impending restrictions. (Even though available drinking water is probably the least of our drought-related concerns.)

Let's check on New Jersey's reservoirs.

The situation is certainly not dire yet. The red dots indicate the observed water level. It is trending right along the long-term average (the grey line with yellow dots). However, we are not running with a surplus or buffer.

New Jersey American Water, the state's largest water company, has already proactively asked for voluntary water conservation in seven New Jersey counties.

If dry weather continues and reservoir levels reach critical levels, those restrictions are likely to expand and become mandatory.

Such rules will not only affect lawn-watering and car-washing, but also the recreation and transportation industries too. One very distinct memory I have of New Jersey's last significant drought in 2002 was the huge fountain at Six Flags Great Adventure (among other places) turned off for the summer. We are coming to the end of the summer season, but in a worst-case scenario, the filling of swimming pools and water slides can be strictly controlled.

In extreme drought, lakes may dry up so much that boat traffic becomes impossible. And the meteorological companion of drought — heat — can affect road conditions and rail lines too.

The unholy trinity of wildfire danger: Low Humidity + High Wind + Dry Fuel = Explosive Wildfire Growth

It's that last piece of the puzzle that becomes more prominent during a dry spell. And it doesn't even have to be a full-on drought for dry brush to become highly flammable. (Or inflammable, if you prefer.) The Pine Barrens cover over a million acres of New Jersey — 22 percent of the state's total land area. One little spark in the middle of a drought can rapidly turn into a disaster.

If conditions become dry enough, fire and forest officials may limit campfires and any outdoor burning. (No such restrictions are in place as of this writing, according to the NJ Forest Fire Service.)

Of course, if water supply becomes limited due to lack of precipitation, available water can become an issue for firefighting efforts. This has been a very real struggle for states in the western U.S. over the last few years. Although it's hard to think about the same dramatic fires here in New Jersey, the danger is very much present during dry times.

This is the category your dormant, brown lawn and your wilting, molting trees fall into.

Much more importantly, New Jersey's nine thousand plus farmers and growers are starting to sweat as drought becomes more and more imminent and more serious. The "Garden State" is looking less green with every dry day that passes.

As you might suspect, in times of drought, water availability quickly becomes a problem for crop irrigation and livestock hydration.

Water quality can also be an issue, leading to "altered rates of carbon, nutrient, and water cycling" according to Drought.gov. Even insect behavior changes during extended dry stretches.

Keep in mind, we have some major crop harvests coming up in New Jersey as summer turns to fall, including corn, grapes for wine, apples, cranberries, pumpkins for Halloween, and evergreen trees for Christmas.

Any challenges in the agricultural world will absolutely filter down to your family's wallet. As the availability of produce goes down, prices goes up. And that is on top of an already-strained supply chain and inflationary economy.

According to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), drought was directly related to 650,000 deaths worldwide from 1970 to 2019. And drought caused global economic losses on the order of $124 billion from 1998 to 2017.

Obviously, New Jersey is better hardened against drought impacts than third-world countries, for example. But still, if we're talking about worst-case scenarios from a true drought-induced "natural disaster" — the purpose of this article — we do have to consider the potential toll in both deaths and dollars.

My goal in writing about drought is to keep you informed and educated about our mounting drought concerns in the Garden State. Nothing more, nothing less. We will continue to keep you updated as our drought status is upgraded and/or downgraded. Thanks, as always, for following along.

Dan Zarrow is Chief Meteorologist for Townsquare Media New Jersey. Follow Dan on Facebook or Twitter for your latest weather forecast updates.

Potato shortage spurs spud rationing and price spikes

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — To the New York City deli owner and chef, a sourcing situation in the supply chain is no small potatoes. Indeed, a tuber shortage in the United States has prompted massive price spikes and rationing among some wholesalers.Spud sparseness became evident to purveyors shopping the Hunts Point produce market in the Bronx in the wee hours of Monday morning. By Wednesday, restaurateurs hitting up Restaurant Depot in the West Plainfield, N.J. store faced advisements on limits.One note to potential hoarders ...

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — To the New York City deli owner and chef, a sourcing situation in the supply chain is no small potatoes. Indeed, a tuber shortage in the United States has prompted massive price spikes and rationing among some wholesalers.

Spud sparseness became evident to purveyors shopping the Hunts Point produce market in the Bronx in the wee hours of Monday morning. By Wednesday, restaurateurs hitting up Restaurant Depot in the West Plainfield, N.J. store faced advisements on limits.

One note to potential hoarders read, “Due to extreme supply shortages of product we are temporarily limiting purchases to a 3 case limit.”

Christopher Maloney of Paratrooper Produce in Tottenville gave chefs a heads up on the issue last week so as to plan accordingly with specials. By early Monday morning, Maloney had scoured the New York Terminal Market in the Bronx for product and turned up nothing — not even specimens known as “Number 2s.” That term applies to ungraded potatoes packed in varying sizes — large and small packed together — typically cooked into hash browns.

“I spent hours looking for potatoes, negotiating on all sizes and all counts. Now a 90-count potato is almost $60 delivered. It should be $20 to $25 max,” said the fruit and veggie monger.

Several Staten Island retailers polled for this story said they experienced sticker shock this week. Silver Lake Bagels owner Mohammed Raza said the cost of five-pound bags for the store had doubled. One small grocer said the price jumped so suddenly the staff didn’t have time to react quickly enough and the store accidentally sold tubers at cost for a day.

APPEALING TO COOKS

“The potato shortage you are referring to is largely [of] the Russet variety,” said Lou Getzelman, vice president Canyon Sales Company LLC. His Bronx-based company at the Terminal Market sells the GPOD-brand of Idaho potatoes, specifically the Russet Burbank variety. Getzelman explained that these oblong-shaped Russets are also referred to as baking potatoes, most popular as the base for French fries and the majority of Idaho’s potato crop.

Getzelman reps the Russet Burbank varietal which he said is “most preferred by New York chefs and kitchens because it bakes fluffy and light compared to the other Russets.”

Before diving into the reasoning behind the 2022 shortage, Getzelman explained why consumers are experiencing such a phenomenon. Ultimately, this comes with the normal growing cycle, Mother Nature and the fact that potatoes are a storage crop.

“Early fall, late September we harvest and that crop lasts us the entire year. We’re running out of potatoes earlier than we normally would. The storage crop is essentially gone right now, when normally we’d have a couple weeks left of storage potatoes from the 2021 harvest,” he said.

Getzelman said, “Last year’s crop yielded fewer potatoes than it normally would. Potatoes have actually been tight all season, one of the shortest seasons Idaho has ever had. The new crop harvest, is delayed because these same growing regions had unseasonably cold and wet weather during the early part of the growing season.”

President of the Idaho Potato Commission Jame Higham underscored, “You have to remember that the potatoes being shipped in July and early August were harvested last fall.”

He added, “Yes, there are fewer potatoes than normal being shipped out of Idaho this time of year. We always wind down the crop in late July and early August as we prepare to start harvesting our new crop of Idaho potatoes. This year has been more of a challenge than we’ve seen in recent years. We had poor growing conditions last summer (heat) which caused our yields to be lower than usual.”

THE STARCHY FORECAST

Relief is coming, according to the experts.

Getzelman said, “Although the potato shortage should slowly get better as more of the new crop is ready to ship mid-August into September, there won’t be significant relief until the crop is fully harvested and the potatoes are all in storage end of September/early October.”

Higham detailed, “We have had good growing weather for our potatoes this year and are expecting much better yields and quality. Harvest is just getting started here in Idaho and supplies should steadily ramp up over the next three to four weeks.”

Higham concluded, “Pricing is very strong currently. The potato market is driven by supply and demand and so that is to be expected. We don’t anticipate prices staying at current levels long-term, but we do expect strong, solid prices throughout the upcoming season.”

OTHER SHORTAGES THIS SUMMER

Spuds aren’t the only persnickety pieces of produce to rankle the retailer this season. Gerardi’s Farmers Market’s Vincent Gerardi said New Jersey peaches and other stone fruits are scarce due to a cold snap in mid-April.

Tom Beyar of Beyar’s Market in Willowbrook shared that he was having a hard time sourcing watermelons. Suppliers had no explanations, he said, adding that the dearth of such basic, seasonal produce serves as a lesson for cooks.

“Think about what you do with a potato — make French fries, potato salad, mashed potatoes....that’s a huge business. And watermelons are what you expect every summer. A shortage of one item goes beyond a restaurant not having it on the menu,” he said.

In the meantime, he’s not raising prices on the fruits of the farmer and store cook’s labor — like on the store’s signature potato salad.

“Yes, I’m holding the prices and hoping new crops come to market soon,” said Beyar.

Pamela Silvestri is Advance Food Editor. She can be reached at [email protected].

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NJ weather: Beautiful Monday, turning steamy and stormy Tuesday

So far in the summer of 2022, we have been blessed with so many stretches of not-humid weather. And we will add one more day to that tally on Monday — sunny, warm, dry, and just plain beautiful.However, changes are afoot for Tuesday, as heat and humidity surge into New Jersey. Not only will that lead to a sticky, steamy, sultry summer day. But we'll also have to keep an eye on the sky for strong to severe thunderstorms.Wednesday will still be very warm, but has the potential to be another dry and reasonably pleasant day....

So far in the summer of 2022, we have been blessed with so many stretches of not-humid weather. And we will add one more day to that tally on Monday — sunny, warm, dry, and just plain beautiful.

However, changes are afoot for Tuesday, as heat and humidity surge into New Jersey. Not only will that lead to a sticky, steamy, sultry summer day. But we'll also have to keep an eye on the sky for strong to severe thunderstorms.

Wednesday will still be very warm, but has the potential to be another dry and reasonably pleasant day.

Our weather turned a bit more unsettled late-week, as a storm system parks off the coast. But if you're looking for a good soaking to solve our recent rainfall deficit, you'll have to wait a little longer.

Another gorgeous, warm summer day. Lather up on the sunscreen. And stay hydrated. Also, beware the moderate risk of rip currents posted at the Jersey Shore.

We're starting off 7/11 Day quite comfortable, with temperatures in the 50s (most of NJ) and 60s (cities and coast). Sunny skies, dry weather, and low humidity means thermometers will shoot up quickly starting mid-morning. Highs should reach the mid 80s Monday afternoon — that is right on our normal highs for July, the hottest time of the year.

We'll keep mainly clear skies and relatively comfortable conditions for Monday night. I doubt it'll be as cool as the previous night. My latest forecast puts lows in the upper 60s or so.

Downright hot and sticky. As hot, humid air surges in on a strong southwesterly breeze, highs will peak in the lower 90s across most of the state. (The only exceptions: far NW NJ and the immediate coast.)

Dew points will rise to about 70 — that is pretty moist, humid air, more typical of summertime in New Jersey.

Skies will be partly sunny through morning and midday. And then we have to watch the skies for some stormy weather.

An isolated shower or thunderstorm may pop in northern/central New Jersey as early as about 1 p.m. Tuesday. But the main event will be ahead of a cold front a bit later — between 4 p.m. and Midnight.

The strongest storms will occur to the north and west, peaking right around dinnertime. As storms approach cooler, more stable air along the coast — and as sunset approaches — storms should fizzle quite a bit.

Heavy rain (1+ inch) and gusty winds (60+ mph) are the biggest concerns. Hail and even a tornado are on the table too. It will definitely be a "weather aware" day.

As rain exits the coast Tuesday night, skies will start to clear. Low temperatures will dip to around 70 degrees through Wednesday morning — typical for mid July.

It will still be a very warm day. But humidity will dial back a bit, with dew points dipping into the 60s.

High temperatures should reach about 85 to 90 degrees on Wednesday. I think we'll see mixed sunshine and clouds.

And I am opting for a dry forecast for now. However, let's not completely rule out a stray shower or storm at some point on Wednesday. The aforementioned cold front is expected to stall just south of New Jersey, and could be the impetus for a little rain activity.

Late-week, the forecast gets tricky as model guidance diverges. The GFS favors unsettled weather and just-below-normal temperatures. The Euro is drier and hotter. For the time being, I have settled on a middle-ground call.

For Thursday, expect mostly cloudy skies and a few showers. Best chance of rain looks to be centered around the midday hours. High temperatures will be held in the lower to mid 80s.

On paper, Friday will be very similar to Thursday. Partial sunshine, with a few showers. No significant wind or severe weather threat. Humidity will be "there," but not stifling and suffocating.

The weekend trends warmer, with mid 80s on Saturday and near 90 on Sunday. The best chance of showers and storms over the weekend looks to be late-day Sunday.

Dan Zarrow is Chief Meteorologist for Townsquare Media New Jersey. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter for the latest forecast and realtime weather updates.

Chemicals in tap water caused testicular cancer, lawsuit against NJ utility says

WOODBRIDGE — Contaminated tap water is being blamed for causing a 25-year-old man to develop testicular cancer.In a lawsuit filed in Superior Court in Middlesex County, a former resident of the Fords section says Middlesex Water Co. failed to warn or notify the public about high levels of chemicals in the water.That was five years ago, at which time Daniel Sullivan had his left testicle removed and underwent months of chemotherapy, according to the complaint filed on Thursday.The Princeton law firm Lieberman, Blech...

WOODBRIDGE — Contaminated tap water is being blamed for causing a 25-year-old man to develop testicular cancer.

In a lawsuit filed in Superior Court in Middlesex County, a former resident of the Fords section says Middlesex Water Co. failed to warn or notify the public about high levels of chemicals in the water.

That was five years ago, at which time Daniel Sullivan had his left testicle removed and underwent months of chemotherapy, according to the complaint filed on Thursday.

The Princeton law firm Lieberman, Blecher & Sinkevich provided a copy of the suit to New Jersey 101.5 on Friday morning.

Sullivan is now 30 and living in Burlington Township but his mother still resides at the Fords property.

According to the lawsuit, she received notice from Middlesex Water in January that the level of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in the water provided to her home, expressed in parts per trillion, was nearly twice the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's accepted threshold as of November 2021.

PFOA is classified as a perfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS), which the lawsuit said can cause a number of health issues, including testicular cancer.

In 2007, the lawsuit said, the state Department of Environmental Protection identified PFOA in the water in Middlesex County connected to a DuPont chemical manufacturing plant in Parlin. Middlesex Water acknowledged the presence of PFOA in its supply a year later.

But as recently as this past May, as MyCentralJersey.com reported, the utility blamed 3M for contaminating the water at its South Plainfield wellfield with PFAS.

Legal action taken against 3M by Middlesex Water dates as far back as 2018, according to Sullivan's lawsuit, but he alleges that in the time since, the utility "did nothing to warn its customers that their water was contaminated."

Sullivan said in the lawsuit that he was a healthy adult, had never smoked, and had no other health issues prior to his cancer diagnosis.

A representative for Middlesex Water told New Jersey 101.5 that the company had not been served with the lawsuit as of Friday afternoon.

Attorney Stuart Lieberman, Sullivan's designated trial counsel, was also unavailable for comment Friday, according to a call placed to his firm.

In an unrelated development in another section of Woodbridge, New Jersey 101.5 in March reported the story of a potential cancer cluster involving alumni and staff of Colonia High School.

The New Jersey Department of Health later downplayed any connection between conditions at the school and more than 100 diagnoses of brain tumors.

In Daniel Sullivan's case, he is charging Middlesex Water with negligence, gross negligence, private and public nuisance, negligent infliction of emotional distress, assault and battery, and failure to warn, and seeks to be awarded medical monitoring and quality of life damages.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Wednesday NJ weather: Ahhh, a one-day break in humidity

We have some subtle changes and weather variety on the way through the rest of the week. One beautiful, non-humid day. One dangerously hot and humid day. One steamy day with rain.And then we fall into fairly typical summertime weather for the first weekend of August. Hot, humid, and occasionally stormy.We'll get an official update on drought statistics on Thursday. At the moment, we still have 12% of NJ classified as "moderate drought". Another 57% of the state is not technically in drought, but still categorized as &...

We have some subtle changes and weather variety on the way through the rest of the week. One beautiful, non-humid day. One dangerously hot and humid day. One steamy day with rain.

And then we fall into fairly typical summertime weather for the first weekend of August. Hot, humid, and occasionally stormy.

We'll get an official update on drought statistics on Thursday. At the moment, we still have 12% of NJ classified as "moderate drought". Another 57% of the state is not technically in drought, but still categorized as "abnormally dry". As I discussed in my weather blog earlier this week, some areas of the state need a full five inches of rain to dig out of the drought deficit.

It is going to be very warm. But as long as you don't mind sweating a little bit, you will find Wednesday to be a beautiful summer day.

We're waking up to lowering humidity, thanks to a weak cold front passage overnight. Dew points may briefly dip into the 50s Wednesday — that is some comfortable air, especially in the middle of summer.

Temperatures are starting the day near 70 degrees. We'll top out in the upper 80s to around 90 degrees. A nice sea breeze will keep the Jersey Shore cooler and more comfortable through Wednesday afternoon.

Sunshine and dry weather all around.

No problems Wednesday night either. It will be clear and mild, with lows around 70.

I do not break out the "dangerous heat" phrase often — only when it is truly warranted. And Thursday is going to be one of those days where you have to intentionally take care of yourself.

A surge of hot, humid air will push high temperatures into the mid to (maybe) upper 90s. The heat index (the "feels like" or "apparent" temperature) may shoot over 100 degrees for part of the day. (Note: Some forecasters are promoting a heat index of 105 or even 110 on Thursday — that seems a bit extreme to me, given the latest model trends.)

The National Weather Service has already popped out a Heat Advisory for most of the state, in effect from 11 a.m. Thursday all the way through 8 p.m. Friday. (I'll break out the exact counties, map, and timing for the advisory in Thursday morning's weather blog, as it is subject to change.)

Thursday will feature blazing sunshine overhead. A popup shower or thunderstorm can't be ruled out, especially in the evening hours.

It is still going to be steamy on Friday. Humidity looks particularly bad.

We'll start the day with temperatures around 75 to 80 degrees — a pretty disgusting morning. I've put Friday's high temperatures near 90 degrees. However, if cloud cover and impending raindrops hold off, I would not rule out thermometers pushing further into the 90s again.

Yes, there is a good chance of rain on Friday too, as a weak, slow-moving front pushes toward New Jersey. The spread and duration of rain will depend on how dry the air is. (Yes, it's going to be humid — but not necessarily throughout all layers of the air.)

Having said that, the atmosphere is going to be exceptionally juicy Friday. (Precipitable water values well over 2 inches.)

So I read the latest forecast as follows. Spotty to scattered showers and thunderstorms from midday through the afternoon and evening hours. Not necessarily steady rain, although downpours are likely. Most locations in New Jersey will see a half-inch to an inch of rainfall. Higher totals are possible where it really pours.

It won't be a drought-buster. But every raindrop helps.

Saturday looks like a typical summer day. Sun and clouds. Hot and humid, with highs in the upper 80s. Moderate to high humidity.

And there is a chance for an afternoon shower or thunderstorm. It does not look like Saturday's rainfall will be as widespread as Friday's — so don't go canceling your weekend plans just yet. But once again, downpours are expected.

Sunday will be the hotter day of the weekend, as highs return to the lower 90s. Skies will be brighter — I'll call it partly sunny. And while there's still a chance of a shower or storm, it looks isolated at best.

Next week starts hot and humid, with more 90s. Our next opportunity for rain and a cooldown will come midweek. (Current model guidance suggests Tuesday into Wednesday will be wet.)

Dan Zarrow is Chief Meteorologist for Townsquare Media New Jersey. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter for the latest forecast and realtime weather updates.

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