HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Skillman, NJ

Let's Talk!

HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Skillman, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

 Human Growth Hormone Skillman, NJ

Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Skillman, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

 Ipamorelin Skillman, NJ

Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Skillman, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Skillman, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Skillman, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Skillman, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Skillman, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Skillman, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Skillman, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Skillman, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Skillman, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Skillman, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Skillman, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When there is an increased concentration of growth hormone by the pituitary gland, there are positive benefits to the body. Some benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Skillman, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number973-587-8638

Request a Consultation

Latest News in Skillman, NJ

Men’s Soccer Gains All-Ivy, Academic All-Ivy Honors

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – Harvard University men's soccer junior Willem Ebbinge, sophomore Alessandro Arlotti, sophomore Jan Riecke, and senior ...

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – Harvard University men's soccer junior Willem Ebbinge, sophomore Alessandro Arlotti, sophomore Jan Riecke, and senior Martin Vician have all earned All-Ivy honors, and senior goalkeeper Oskar Nilsson has captured Academic All-Ivy accolades, the Ivy League conference office announced on Wednesday afternoon.

Ebbinge gained First Team All-Ivy unanimously, taking home First Team All-Ivy for the second straight year. Arlotti – the 2021 Ivy League Rookie of the Year – captured First Team All-Ivy for the second time in as many seasons. After gaining Honorable Mention All-Ivy last fall, Riecke gained First Team All-Ivy this year while Vician garnered Second Team All-Ivy for the second straight season. Nilsson gained Academic All-Ivy for the first time.

Arlotti tallied 17 points on five goals and seven assists in 2022, ranking second on the team in points, second in assists, and third in goals. He stood sixth in the conference in points and seventh in assists. In Ivy play, he led the team in points (eight) and goals (three). For his career, he has tallied 42 points on 14 goals and 14 assists in 33 games.

Ebbinge – who ranks fifth in the NCAA in assists per game (0.69) – led Harvard in points (18) and assists (12) on the season, while adding three goals. He paced the Ivy League in assists both in overall games (12) and in conference contests only (seven). Over the last two seasons, he has tallied 22 assists in 31 games.

Riecke anchored the Crimson's defense, playing 1,523 of a possible 1,530 minutes on the season, helping Harvard tally six shutouts on the year. He played all 630 minutes in Ivy play, contributing to two clean sheets. For his career, he has appeared in 3,042 of a possible 3,059 minutes over his first two seasons.

Vician led the Crimnson in goals (six), while ranking third in points (13) in 2022. He ranked seventh in the conference in goals. Over his final two seasons, Vician totaled 32 points on 14 goals and four assists over 32 games played.

Nilsson posted a 6-3-4 record, a 1.38 GAA, .729 save percentage in three shutouts on the season. He played all 630 minutes in Ivy League play, notching a 1.29 GAA, .750 save percentage, 3-1-3 record, and two clean sheets. For his career, he posted a 1.77 GAA, 7.23 save percentage, and five shutouts in 37 games.

Harvard closed the season unbeaten in its last eight games (5-0-3) and undefeated in its last six Ivy League contests (3-0-3). The Crimson claimed third place in the Ivy League standings with 12 points, marking its highest finish in the conference table since 2015. Harvard concluded the season with a 7-1-1 record at home.

OFFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR

Stas Korzeniowski, Penn (So., F – Skillman, N.J.)

DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR

Leo Burney, Penn (So., D – Seattle, Wash.)

ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

Ryan Friedberg, Cornell (Fr., GK – Westfield, N.J.)

COACH OF THE YEAR

*Brian Gill, Penn

FIRST TEAM ALL-IVY^

*Stas Korzeniowski, Penn (So., F – Skillman, N.J.) *Willem Ebbinge, Harvard (Jr., M – Queenstown, New Zealand) *Emeka Eneli, Cornell (5th, F – Dublin, Ohio) Elian Haddock, Yale (Sr., GK – Whitefish Bay, Wisc.) Connor Drought, Cornell (Sr., D – Mukilteo, Wash.) Lucas Gen, Princeton (Sr., D – Sacramento, Calif.) Jan Riecke, Harvard (So., D – Berlin, Germany) Alessandro Arlotti, Harvard (So., M – Monaco) Leo Burney, Penn (So., D – Seattle, Wash.) Ryan Clare, Princeton (Sr., M – Wellesley, Mass.) Isaac McGinnis, Penn (Sr., M – Brighton, N.Y.) Paolo Carroll, Yale (Sr., F – Sao Paulo, Brazil) Brandon Morales, Cornell (Sr., F – Pharr, Texas)

SECOND TEAM ALL-IVY^

Nick Christoffersen, Penn (Sr., GK – Toronto, Ontario) Jeremy Haddock, Yale (Sr., D – Whitefish Bay, Wisc.) Matt Leong, Columbia (Jr., D – Hoboken, N.J.) TJ Presthus, Yale (So., D – New Albany, Ohio) Jack Rosener, Penn (Sr., D – McLean, Va.) Mateo Godoy, Princeton (Sr., M – Los Angeles, Calif.) Jules Oberg, Yale (Sr., M – Stockholm, Sweden) Lalo Serrano, Cornell (Jr., - M – Glendale, Ariz.) Jamin Gogo Peters, Brown (Fr., F – Forest Grove, Ore.) Ben Stitz, Penn (Sr., F – Baltimore, Md.) Martin Vician, Harvard (Sr., F – Bratislava, Slovakia)

HONORABLE MENTION

Michael Collodi, Columbia (Sr., GK – Frisco, Texas) Ryan Friedberg, Cornell (Fr., GK – Westfield, N.J.) Ben Do, Penn (So., D – Seaside, Calif.) Andrew Johnson, Cornell (Fr., D – Philadelphia, Pa.) Sam Fenton, Dartmouth (Fr., D – Mount Laurel, N.J.) Cam Maquat, Cornell (Sr., D – Easton, Conn.) Louis Weisdorf, Dartmouth (So., D – Copenhagen, Denmark) Oskar Magnusson, Dartmouth (Fr., M – Reykjavik, Iceland) Malik Pinto, Princeton (Jr., M – Durham, N.C.) Max Rogers, Yale (So., M – Sydney, Australia) Eric Sachleben, Dartmouth (Sr., M – San Francisco, Calif.) Daniel Diaz-Bonilla, Princeton (Sr., F – Vienna, Va.)

Sourland Nonprofits Awarded NJHT Grant

Pictured (from left) John Buck, Elaine Buck, Bruce Daniels, Beverly Mills, and Dante DiPirro. Photo credit Catherine Fulmer-Hogan.(SKILLMAN, NJ) -- The Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum (SSAAM) and the Sourland Conservancy have announced that the New Jersey Historic Trust (NJHT) has recommended a preservation grant for a Historic Site Management Projec...

Pictured (from left) John Buck, Elaine Buck, Bruce Daniels, Beverly Mills, and Dante DiPirro. Photo credit Catherine Fulmer-Hogan.

(SKILLMAN, NJ) -- The Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum (SSAAM) and the Sourland Conservancy have announced that the New Jersey Historic Trust (NJHT) has recommended a preservation grant for a Historic Site Management Project Plan, from the Preserve New Jersey Historic Preservation Fund, in the amount of $75,000, to support the two organizations’ jointly-owned True Farmstead on Hollow Road in Skillman. The Garden State Preservation Trust will authorize the grant awards at its October meeting.

This generous NJHT Grant will enable the Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum to bring to light the significant contributions made by African American families to the history and culture of this region. The True family lived at the Farmstead from 1881 – 1994. Their contributions ranged from service in the Civil War to playing a crucial role in the life of the historic register-listed Mt. Zion AME Church and the historic Camp Meetings, held in support of Mt. Zion AME and the local community.

The Grant will enable the Sourland Conservancy to provide a model for good land stewardship in the environmentally critical and sensitive Sourland Mountain Region. This component of the preservation plan will include elimination of invasive plants from the property, planting of indigenous plants, and creating spaces for demonstrations and workshops related to ecology, history, the relationship between the two, and social and environmental justice.

Donnetta Bishop-Johnson, SSAAM’s Executive Director stated, “This project will help to ‘fill in the blanks’ in American history, which will enable us to understand where we are today and how we can move forward to a more just, equitable, and inclusive future.”

“The Farmstead will provide a welcoming space for visitors to reconnect with nature.” said Laurie Cleveland, the Conservancy’s Executive Director. "We’re looking forward to designing traditional-looking landscaping using native plants and hosting educational events to encourage visitors, residents and businesses to take steps to sustain wildlife, reduce pollution and flooding, and improve human health.”

The Historic Site Management Project supported by this grant award will include a preservation plan, a condition assessment, a national register nomination, architectural plans, cost estimates, an archaeological investigation, a landscape report, a historic research report, a building system analysis, a disaster management plan, and ADA accessibility planning.

The Sourland Conservancy and SSAAM have worked in partnership for the past several years,” said Dante DiPirro, SC’s board President. “The unique and sensitive Sourland Mountain Region provides the context for this unique partnership. There is a deep and complicated relationship between the cultural landscape and the natural landscape of this Region.

“Our organizations are thrilled to receive this support for the restoration and preservation of the Farmstead structure and for stewardship of the Farmstead land. The True Farmstead will become a showcase in our region for the culture and contributions of the African American community,” explained John Buck, SSAAM’s Board President.

Work will begin on the True Farmstead Preservation Plan in 2023. Mills + Schnoering Architects, LLC, of Princeton, will develop the preservation plan and oversee the Historic Site Management Projects. Steward Green LLC ,of Bridgewater, will prepare the True Farmstead Land Stewardship Plan. Hunter Research, Inc. of Trenton, will write the historic register nomination.

The Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum and the Sourland Conservancy are grateful to the New Jersey Historic Trust for its continued support, and look forward to working with the Trust and with our project professionals.

AVEENO® RELEASES NEW REPORT REVEALING THAT 71% OF ADULTS HAVE SENSITIVE SKIN

Groundbreaking State of Skin Sensitivity report raises awareness of the causes of skin sensitivity, and its mind-body connection SKILLMAN, N.J., Oct. 25, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, the Aveeno® brand launched its first-ever State of Skin Sensitivity Report, which examines the causes of sensitive skin, and explores the con...

Groundbreaking State of Skin Sensitivity report raises awareness of the causes of skin sensitivity, and its mind-body connection

SKILLMAN, N.J., Oct. 25, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, the Aveeno® brand launched its first-ever State of Skin Sensitivity Report, which examines the causes of sensitive skin, and explores the connection between body, mind, and skin. While body positivity has spread to mainstream culture in recent years, self-love can be challenging for those of us with sensitive skin. The groundbreaking Aveeno® report shows that 71% of adults identify as having sensitive skin1,2, an astounding increase of 55%3,4 in just two decades. The impact of this sensitivity is more than skin deep, as common skin conditions can carry significant psychological impact, influencing quality of life and emotional well-being.

Research from the State of Skin Sensitivity report validates the relationship between emotions and perceptions of sensitive skin.

"Treating patients goes well beyond simply analyzing their skin. It's about how their skin impacts their overall emotional well-being, which is something I consistently see with my patients," said Dr. Mara Weinstein Velez, Board Certified Dermatologist and paid Aveeno® consultant. "The mind-skin connection is a powerful one, and the Aveeno® brand's ability to assemble this in-depth report examining the impact of skin sensitivity provides much needed visibility for the dermatology community."

"Our brand heritage is built on leadership and expertise in the sensitive skin state, and this report illustrates the meaningful impact sensitive skin has on people's lives," said KC Hagin, Commercial Leader for Aveeno® at Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. "We have an obligation not only to provide product solutions but to help de-stigmatize the word 'sensitive' and to turn a common struggle into a strength. Aveeno® wants to be front and center of the conversation and is encouraging everyone to be proud of their sensitive skin."

To further encourage conversation around what it really means to have sensitive skin, Aveeno® is calling on consumers to share their #ProudlySensitiveSkin stories on social media. The campaign aims to highlight various consumer experiences with skin conditions and showcase how people have learned to love their sensitive skin. By changing the narrative, Aveeno® is facilitating connection with like-minded individuals in a deeper way and celebrating sensitive skin, and all that comes with it.

All submissions will be entered for the chance to win a virtual mentoring session with one brand partner, Tia Mowry or Hyram Yarbro. To enter, please follow the instructions below and more details here:

Aveeno® knows that sensitive skin is real and can have a tremendous impact on quality of life which is strongly illustrated in this report. The brand is committed to igniting and fueling the positive narrative around sensitive skin, while also being dedicated to delivering products that bring nourishing solutions to sensitive skin.

Forty-one Aveeno® products carry the "Trusted Choice" SkinSAFE Seal which uses over 25 years of clinical skin testing data to help people with sensitive skin find the right products that are safe for their skin. Aveeno® is committed to being transparent with consumers about the products they use every day and how it affects their skin, their health and the planet.

Media Contact:

Holly DerrickJohnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. [email protected]

Kristin AdomaitisGolin[email protected]

About the business of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc.: At Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc., we are driven to improve the personal health of people everywhere. Our differentiated portfolio of iconic brands, including Tylenol®, Zarbee's®, Neutrogena®, Aveeno®, Listerine®, OGX®, and Johnson's®, delivers life-enhancing, first-to-market innovation. By combining the power of science with meaningful human insights and digital-first thinking, we help more than 1.2 billion people live healthier lives every day, from their very first day.

About Aveeno®: For the past 70 years, dermatologist-recommended Aveeno® has unlocked the power of science and nature for healthy, beautiful skin. Aveeno® is committed to developing breakthrough product formulations with new and existing natural ingredients, many of which deliver clinically proven results. The Aveeno® Brand offers products for face, body, baby, hair, and sun protection. For more information about the Aveeno® Brand and its product offerings, visit aveeno.com or follow us on Facebook at Facebook.com/Aveeno or Instagram at Instagram.com/AveenoUS.

About the State of Skin Sensitivity Report survey: Aveeno® conducted an online survey of 1,000 participants (800 females, 200 males, aged 18-65) among self-declared sensitive skin consumers of varying ethnicities. Results include:

References: *Annotated references linked in the full study on: https://www.aveeno.com/state-of-skin-sensitivity

Cautions Concerning Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains "forward-looking statements" as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding [product development / development of Aveeno].1. The reader is cautioned not to rely on these forward-looking statements. These statements are based on current expectations of future events. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or known or unknown risks or uncertainties materialize, actual results could vary materially from the expectations and projections of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. and/or Johnson & Johnson. Risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: challenges and uncertainties inherent in product research and development, including the uncertainty of clinical success and of obtaining regulatory approvals; uncertainty of commercial success; [manufacturing difficulties and delays;] competition, including technological advances, new products and patents attained by competitors; challenges to patents; [product efficacy or safety concerns resulting in product recalls or regulatory action;] changes in behavior and spending patterns of purchasers of health care products and services; changes to applicable laws and regulations, including global health care reforms; and trends toward health care cost containment. A further list and descriptions of these risks, uncertainties and other factors can be found in Johnson & Johnson's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2022, including in the sections captioned "Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements" and "Item 1A. Risk Factors," and in Johnson & Johnson's subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Copies of these filings are available online at www.sec.gov, www.jnj.com or on request from Johnson & Johnson. Neither Johnson & Johnson Consumer, Inc., nor Johnson & Johnson undertakes to update any forward-looking statement as a result of new information or future events or developments.

SOURCE Aveeno

Ida, 1 year later — NJ families still fighting to get home

Maryann Morris has been draining her funds to live in an apartment in Bridgewater since October with her young daughter, as she continues a handful of battles aimed at eventually returning to her home in Manville that was destroyed by Ida one year ago."We will not have a k...

Maryann Morris has been draining her funds to live in an apartment in Bridgewater since October with her young daughter, as she continues a handful of battles aimed at eventually returning to her home in Manville that was destroyed by Ida one year ago.

"We will not have a kitchen, but we will be moving back at the end of September, into a partial house," Morris told New Jersey 101.5. "I am scared to go back to the house, but I know that I can't afford $3,000 a month in rent."

The return home comes just in time for the end of her mortgage forbearance, which is set to expire on Oct. 1.

Since the remnants of Hurricane Ida struck New Jersey on Sept. 1, 2021, Morris has learned that she would not be reimbursed for the initial thousands of dollars she had spent on hotel stays, and that her required flood insurance policy would not be covering critical pieces of her home that were pummeled by sewage water the night of the storm.

Currently, she's waiting on FEMA to investigate her case and determine whether she deserves more from the insurance company.

"If I don't get more from them, I'm going to have to figure out a way to get myself into more debt, just to fix the house," Morris said.

Morris represents just one of the many New Jersey families still fighting to make themselves whole, following the storm that delivered tornadoes and catastrophic, deadly flooding. Ida resulted in major disaster declarations for residents, businesses and local governments in the counties of Bergen, Cape May, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Passaic, Somerset, Union, and Warren.

"Now when it rains, I'm afraid to fall asleep," said Debby Josephs, who managed to move back into her Manville home in April, but still sees water coming into her home during storms.

Josephs and one of her sons were rescued by the fire department in a boat, after waking up around 5 a.m. on Sept. 2 to find her neighborhood underwater.

"This was my proud and joy, being able to buy this home," she said. "For seven months, I didn't sleep until I was able to get home, and at least have a roof over my head to call my own."

Josephs had to take on debt in the form of a Small Business Administration loan in order to stay afloat, not knowing that making such a move would make her ineligible for other forms of help. Meanwhile, Josephs said, she's dealing with a "contractor from hell" and waiting on her insurance company to provide more assistance.

The public comment period is open now, on New Jersey's plans to spend more than $228 million in federal Ida recovery funds. The spending plan was developed, in part, through survey responses from impacted residents. These are "last in" dollars for folks who've exhausted other routes of financial assistance.

According to New Jersey Organizing Project, an advocate for storm survivors, $228 million "is not nearly enough" for all Ida-impacted families to recover, and many survivors will be left without sufficient help.

The group is calling for an increase in funding of $160 million, to be pulled from federal pandemic aid and other possible federal funding sources.

Montgomery Promenade Hopes to Break Ground Soon on Route 206

The new potential developer of Montgomery Promenade on Route 206 by the Princeton Airport will appear before the Montgomery Township Planning Board on Monday, August 22. They are asking for final approval on their two-phase plan to build a massive shopping center with a Whole Foods supermarket. Madison Marquette, initially submitted plans for a shopping center on the 53.5-acre field next to Princeton Airport in 2005. The...

The new potential developer of Montgomery Promenade on Route 206 by the Princeton Airport will appear before the Montgomery Township Planning Board on Monday, August 22. They are asking for final approval on their two-phase plan to build a massive shopping center with a Whole Foods supermarket.

Madison Marquette, initially submitted plans for a shopping center on the 53.5-acre field next to Princeton Airport in 2005. The developer, who also built Princeton MarketFair on Route 1 and helped to revitalize Asbury Park, then added 34 homes to the plan. The years ticked by — a recession slowed the project, then shoppers started buying many things online rather than in brick-and-mortar stores. The COVID-19 pandemic made things worse. Madison Marquette dropped the Montgomery project.

Montgomery Township has three shopping centers by the corner of Routes 206 and 518 — which is the busiest intersection in the township. The Montgomery Shopping Center, anchored by ShopRite, is 155,000 square feet and has a couple empty store fronts. One of its anchor stores, Walgreens, closed this year. It is managed by Hilton Realty in West Windsor.

Princeton North Shopping Center, a 92,000 square-foot strip center anchored by Princeton Fitness and Wellness Center, was renovated in 2009 and has 450 parking spaces on about 10 acres. Managed by Kent Builders Management LLC in Tenafly.

Finally, there is The Village Walk at Montgomery, a new mixed-use community billed as "Downtown Montgomery" and owned by a Montgomery family, Pugliese Properties. The Village Shoppes will house a 90,000-square-foot mix of national, regional and local restaurants, cafes, retail stores, and service businesses. A new three-story commercial / residential structure will replace the single story strip mall. It will have 52 residential apartments (including 11 affordable units) on the second and third floors, with commercial / retail space on the first floor.

A development firm out of Atlanta, Georgia proposes that Montgomery can support an additional 287,000-square-foot “town center.” SJC Ventures' proposal would contain retail, restaurants, a theater and entertainment building, a bank, a daycare facility, and a Whole Foods.

SJC has a contract to purchase the 53.5-acre field next to the Princeton Airport on Route 206. The new developer, who is doing business under the name Princeton Promenade LLC, appeared before the Montgomery Planning Board in December 2021, asking the board to help them speed up the "town center" at the corner of Route 206 and Route 518 in Montgomery Township.

SJC is a bit cautious, and plans to build the shopping center in two phases. Phase I includes 11 mixed-use retail buildings of about 162,200 square feet and 29 residential dwellings. Phase II contains five mixed-use retail buildings of about 125,500 square feet and five residential dwellings. Princeton MarketFair, for comparison, is 246,000 square feet.

A recent report in GlobeSt.com reports that "brick-and-mortar retail is at last finding its place in the sun."

"For years, even prior to the pandemic-induced recession, we saw closings and bankruptcies as internet sales grew and certain long-familiar brands, unable to adjust to new modes of shopping, fell by the wayside," according to Jonathan Hipp, principal, U.S. Capital Markets and Head of The Net Lease Group for Avison Young. "The problem only escalated during the depths of the pandemic, when quarantine protocols forced shoppers to turn to their keyboards."

However, people have a "strong desire to congregate, to get out and about," he says. "The social nature within all of us draws us to the long-touted retail experience, and investors and developers are responding. We're betting on the consumer's need to congregate once again."

SJC will appear before the Montgomery Planning Board on Monday, August 22, at 7 pm. They are officially seeking approval for an Amended Preliminary and Final Major Site Plan for phase 1 of the project and for “Final Major Site Plan” for phase 2.

The meeting will be held in the new Montgomery Municipal Center, Chambers Room, located at 100 Community Drive in Skillman.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Global Life Rejuvenation is Here to Help You Get your young life back.

Want to feel younger, want to decrease the feeling of your age. Give us a call at 866-793-9933 to chat with us, or contact us via the form below. We’re here to help in any possible way.


booking image new

Call Us

Call 866.793.9933 for a hormone
replacement consultation or email us!

Email

[email protected]

Service Areas

Copyright Global Life Rejuvenation. All rights reserved.