HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Hillsdale, NJ

Let's Talk!

HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY for Women estrogen
 HRT For Men Hillsdale, NJ

What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

 Human Growth Hormone Hillsdale, NJ

Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Hillsdale, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

 Ipamorelin Hillsdale, NJ

Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Hillsdale, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

 Sermorelin Hillsdale, NJ

Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Hillsdale, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Hillsdale, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Hillsdale, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Hillsdale, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Hillsdale, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Hillsdale, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Hillsdale, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Hillsdale, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Hillsdale, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When there is an increased concentration of growth hormone by the pituitary gland, there are positive benefits to the body. Some benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Hillsdale, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number973-587-8638

Request a Consultation

Latest News in Hillsdale, NJ

Hillsdale council approves changes to redevelopment plan for industrial site near downtown

The Borough Council gave initial approval Monday night to allow the construction of self-storage units in addition to mixed-use residential units on an industrialized site north of downtown where some residents want a community center to be built.Amending the borough’s 2020 Hillsdale-Patterson Street Redevelopment Plan to let a developer build self-storage units would bring in tax revenue without affecting the schools or emergency services.In addition, the council approved amendments that allow residential ...

The Borough Council gave initial approval Monday night to allow the construction of self-storage units in addition to mixed-use residential units on an industrialized site north of downtown where some residents want a community center to be built.

Amending the borough’s 2020 Hillsdale-Patterson Street Redevelopment Plan to let a developer build self-storage units would bring in tax revenue without affecting the schools or emergency services.

In addition, the council approved amendments that allow residential development of 28 units per acre, which could include affordable housing, and lowered the density bonus — the maximum number of units allowed for the entire site — to 60 units from 68.

The council also approved an amendment to the redevelopment plan that would limit the height of anything constructed on the site to three stories and reduce the height limit of each floor from 14 feet to 10 feet.

Though no developer has yet been approved to build out the site, a joint venture between Claremont Development and March Development of Morristown has been designated as the conditionally appointed developer.

No agreement has yet been reached with them about what will be built, said Mayor John Ruocco. "We are still in the negotiating stage, using the redevelopment plan," he said.

The permitted uses for the area, based on the borough’s master plan, include residential mixed use, with commercial space on the ground floor and residences above, along with general public purposes and commercial services. The units could include multifamily residences, an assisted living facility, beer gardens and a licensed spa.

The redevelopment plan, adopted in October 2020, encompasses the industrial properties on Patterson Street, Knickerbocker Avenue, Brookside Place, Piermont Avenue and Prospect Place. The area was designated for redevelopment a year earlier.

The borough's affordable housing agreement with the Fair Share Housing Center and the courts requires it to build 24 affordable units in the industrial redevelopment area. Claremont/March would not be responsible for building those units, even if they sign a redevelopers' agreement with Hillsdale.

"Claremont March is only building on a portion of the industrial redevelopment zone,” Ruocco said. “However, their current plans assume they will build at least 20 units."

The changes to the redevelopment plan now go to the Planning Board, which has 45 days to provide comments. The council will then consider those comments and may adopt all, some or none of them, and will then consider final adoption of the amendments on June 14 at a second reading.

Residents are lobbying for a community center on the site. "We are the only town in Bergen County that does not have a community center," resident Louise Sharrer said at Monday’s meeting.

"Seniors are 20% of the population. Please make that a must-have priority in the development project," she said.

The Hillsdale-Patterson Street Redevelopment is one of several projects taking place in the borough. Less than a one-minute walk from the development area, a Chipotle restaurant has been approved for 441 Hillsdale Ave., where a former Friendly's was housed.

Shaylah Brown is a local reporter for NorthJersey.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

$82.5M middle school referendum approved for 2023

HILLSDALE—The Hillsdale Board of Education voted unanimously June 13 to go ahead with an estimated $82.5 million school bond referendum in March 2023 to replace the century-old George G. White Middle School.The June 13 meeting, held at George G. White Middle School, was attended by 25–30 residents, in the school’s large cafetorium. More than two dozen residents peppered the board with questions about tax increases, lower-cost alternatives, and an alleged lack of public outreach about their plans.Operating with...

HILLSDALE—The Hillsdale Board of Education voted unanimously June 13 to go ahead with an estimated $82.5 million school bond referendum in March 2023 to replace the century-old George G. White Middle School.

The June 13 meeting, held at George G. White Middle School, was attended by 25–30 residents, in the school’s large cafetorium. More than two dozen residents peppered the board with questions about tax increases, lower-cost alternatives, and an alleged lack of public outreach about their plans.

Operating without an audio system, both residents’ and trustees’ voices occasionally were inaudible.

After the meeting, Superintendent Robert Lombardy told Pascack Press that the proposed project’s schematic plans would be submitted to the state Department of Education to review and approve. Lombardy has said as the project is 100% new construction, it was unlikely to qualify for any state aid reimbursement.

If approved next March, the measure will cost an average Hillsdale taxpayer an extra $1,300 over a 20-year bond term, officials said.

Trustees stressed that local voters will ultimately decide via a referendum vote whether to approve the new middle school. However, board president Shane Svorec said if citizens do not do something today to improve the school, “something will happen that will force us to pay.”

Svorec said the board’s choice to replace the middle school was “extremely frugal” and “fiscally responsible” while at least a dozen residents criticized the added tax burden and cited the need for the district to better explain why a new middle school now is the best option for taxpayers.

Several residents claimed they had only recently read about or heard about the proposed referendum, and at one point a resident, Adam Hampton, and Svorec traded tense words over what Svorec viewed as negative social media comments about board transparency.

Trustees have been discussing a possible referendum for nearly a year at public meetings. However, little information has been posted on the district website.

Moreover, several residents wondered why the board declines to broadcast and archive its public meetings given widely available broadcasting/recording technology. Trustees did not address the issue.

Some speakers noted other residents cannot attend a meeting but would prefer to watch it online if available. Svorec said the board has always answered questions from all residents attending school board meetings about the referendum.

The Borough Council broadcasts and archives its meetings online, and Mayor John Ruocco has recently pressed for more transparency by asking that documents to be approved at public meetings are linked to the council’s online agenda.

Those documents are considered “advisory, consultative or draft” under the Open Public Records Act (OPRA) and generally withheld from public view until approved.

Overall, only a few school boards broadcast their meetings, though school district costs generally consume 60% to 75% of a taxpayer’s yearly property tax bill. (See “Reporter’s Notebook: Which towns, school boards livestream?” Pascack Press online, April 10, 2022.)

(Moreover, Pascack Press has reported on the proposed referendum at least seven times since November 2021. See “Replacing George G. White: District eyes next chapter for veteran school,” Nov. 19. 2021.)

At least a half-dozen residents said that they did not believe the school board provided enough publicly accessible information about the referendum, specifically dinging the board for not putting the architect’s detailed presentation online for more residents to view.

The presentation addressed the three renovation scenarios and replacement, total costs and bonding costs, and explained what each included. Pascack Press requested a copy of the presentation — and received it — after also questioned why it was not put on the district website.

After the meeting, Lombardy said the presentation would appear online soon, likely as part of a school referendum website, and more information would be provided on the referendum through the fall and winter. Multiple residents said they had requested the presentation via OPRA, but had not received it from the district.

The options included three renovation options and a full replacement option. At the May 9 board meeting, all trustees publicly supported the $82.5 million full replacement option.

Trustees and the district administration have been discussing the possible referendum, and lesser-priced renovation options ranging from $25 million, $52 million, and $60 million, before the public since April 11.

The April 11 meeting was when architect DiCara Rubino, and Lombardy, revealed cost estimates and fully explained each option. (See “George G. White estimates in,” Pascack Press online, April 16, 2022.)

Svorec urged all residents to never hesitate to ask questions and to vote in the referendum, no matter what way they’re going to vote. “It’s up to us to communicate with the residents that this building needs attention,” said Svorec, noting any of the three renovation options would “be putting Band-Aids on the issue.”

When one resident questioned whether all options were considered, including moving fifth graders back to the two elementary schools, Svorec said those were considered. Several residents pressed trustees to explain the reasoning and planning that supports their decision to build a completely new middle school.

One resident wondered, “Gee whiz, is there another way to do this?” Another suggested that the board should put together a frequently asked questions section on its website for the referendum.

Svorec promised the board would be “pumping out more information” as the referendum process moves along.

Several residents questioned what possible impacts, including flooding, might occur with the new school being built across from its present location, an area apparently prone to a high water table and occasional flooding.

Others questioned how much inflation might impact final project costs and taxes.

Should a referendum pass, Lombardy previously said he anticipated the replacement project to get underway in mid-2024, with property taxes likely to increase in 2024-2025.

While most renovation options provided little or no new classroom space, all required current middle school students to spend 18–24 months housed in trailers across the street from the current middle school while renovations are completed on the middle school.

The estimated cost to house students in trailers is $3.7 to $4 million, said officials.

At public meetings, Lombardy had offered a detailed explanation of the four options, three for onsite renovations and one complete replacement.

The onsite renovation options started at $25 million, which included renovation to the existing middle school with no additions; $52 million to renovate and add on and use the current gym; and $60 million to renovate, add on classrooms and include a larger gymnasium in the current facility.

Annual average taxpayer costs for the proposed renovations’ bonding break out as follows: $25 million will cost $408 yearly or $24 monthly; $52 million will cost $845 yearly or $60 per month; and $60 million will cost $937, or about $70 per month, Lombardy said.

None of those options will be on the ballot; registered voters will vote yes or no on spending $82.5 million for a new middle school replacement.

Previously, Lombardy stressed that all three renovation options would require student classrooms to be housed for 18 to 24 months in modular trailer units across from the existing middle school, a situation that would likely harm students’ educational experience.

High School Rankings: Where Pascack Valley Falls On U.S. News List

HILLSDALE, NJ — Pascack Valley High School is the 119th best high school in New Jersey, according to U.S. News & World Report. The publication's new rankings include nearly 24,000 high schools across the nation.This year, there were 406 schools ranked in New Jersey.The 2022 ranking of best high schools is intended to show how well the nation's public schools serve all students, regardless of achievement l...

HILLSDALE, NJ — Pascack Valley High School is the 119th best high school in New Jersey, according to U.S. News & World Report. The publication's new rankings include nearly 24,000 high schools across the nation.

This year, there were 406 schools ranked in New Jersey.

The 2022 ranking of best high schools is intended to show how well the nation's public schools serve all students, regardless of achievement level, by teaching them basic skills and preparing them for college-level work, according to a news release from U.S. News.

Families can also use the rankings to see how schools compare at the national, state and local levels on factors such as graduation rates and college readiness.

You can see the full list of Bergen County schools here.

Pascack Valley was ranked number 2,898 nationally.

Ninety percent of the rankings incorporate performances on AP and IB exams and standardized tests, while the remaining 10 percent is the graduation rate. The rankings incorporate six categories:

The data used in this year's ranking is from the 2019-20 academic school year. U.S. News adjusted its calculation of these measures to account for the impact COVID-19 had on schools in the 2019-20 school year.

Since most states closed schools for in-person instruction starting in March 2020 — typically just before most states conduct assessments — the U.S. Department of Education granted waivers allowing all states to forgo state testing for the 2019-20 school year.

Read more about the methodology here.

But, U.S. News & World Report school rankings have their critics. James Fallows, a former U.S. News editor, even called them "meaningless" in an interview with NPR.

"The reason they started doing it back in the early 1980s under the guidance of a man named Mel Elfin, was because it was a brilliant business strategy," Fallows said. "By appealing to the human desire for rankings and knowing where you stand and where somebody else stands, they were able to make a very strong part of their business, which is now basically the only part of their business."

U.S. News, however, contends that the rankings help parents make better-informed decisions about their children's education.

"The goal is to provide a clear, unbiased picture," the report says, "of how well public schools serve all of their students — from the highest to lowest achieving — in preparing them to demonstrate proficiency in basic skills as well as readiness for college-level work."

In addition to the national rankings, U.S. News also published rankings at the state, metro area and school district levels. Only metro areas and school districts with three or more high schools were included in these subrankings.

Signature School in Indiana is at the top of the list for charter schools, and Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia is the No. 1 magnet school. The Davidson Academy of Nevada is the top STEM school.

Inside N.J.’s last Kmart, a depressing bastion of forgotten retail. How long will it last?

Westwood Plaza, a faceless strip mall in Bergen County, is now home to one of New Jersey’s most dubious pieces of retail history.Here lies New Jersey’s last remaining Kmart, a zombified version of the once-omnipresent franchise wading toward its final Blue Light Special. Stowed a few miles off the Garden State Parkway, the lonely store is now one of only three U.S....

Westwood Plaza, a faceless strip mall in Bergen County, is now home to one of New Jersey’s most dubious pieces of retail history.

Here lies New Jersey’s last remaining Kmart, a zombified version of the once-omnipresent franchise wading toward its final Blue Light Special. Stowed a few miles off the Garden State Parkway, the lonely store is now one of only three U.S. locations left standing, after the franchise’s Avenel location shuttered in April amid sweeping closures.

Kmart, which opened its first store in Michigan in 1962 (born from a five-and-dime called Kresge’s founded in 1899), once touted dozens of New Jersey locations among its nearly 2,500 North American stores, peaking in 1994. Nostalgic shoppers may recall spinoffs like Super Kmart, Super Kmart Center and Big Kmart.

The Jersey staple was a cheaper and more convenient retail option than the mall, and Kmart offered a little bit of everything — a one-stop shop for clothing, cleaning supplies, appliances, sports equipment, jewelry and more. And if you got hungry from all that perusing, a hot dog or bag of popcorn was ready in the cafe.

“They would have everything you needed,” said Adele, a resident of nearby Piermont, N.Y. who still makes the trip across the state line to visit the Westwood Kmart. “Household items, accessories, toys, kids things. Bicycles, there was a whole line that you could select from.”

But during our visit last week, the lingering big box store was almost empty — more of a derelict, fluorescently lit portal to the past than a functional shopping experience. Shelves were sparse or altogether barren, loosely stocked with Trapper Keepers, above-ground pools and Valentine’s Day cards (it’s June). One corner of the store was completely bereft of merchandise, blocked off to customers by a barricade of shelves. Elsewhere, Adele’s line of bikes was reduced to a dwindling few on an otherwise bare wall.

Yet one aisle remained full: The DVD section, a format made obsolete by the internet — just like Kmart. Posters for movies and TV shows that have since been replaced by sequels and new seasons were still on display: Season 3 of “Stranger Things,” and “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” both of which were released in 2019.

Only a handful of staff members remain employed at the Westwood location (none were made available to talk to NJ Advance Media), yet they nearly outnumbered the paltry few customers who lurked in the aisles.

When asked if the final Jersey store, first opened in 1982, has plans to close, the store’s manager declined comment and directed NJ Advance Media to contact their corporate office, operated by Illinois-based parent company Transformco, which was not reachable for comment.

But let’s be real — it doesn’t look good.

Washington Township resident Rosanne used to shop at the Kmart in Paramus, which closed in 2014, before she started taking trips to the Westwood store. She’d bring her grandchildren here while babysitting, “just to waste time.” She still finds herself shopping there for herself now. On this day, she was simply looking for a broom.

“I can’t say it’s nostalgic. But it’s convenient,” Rosanne said. “It was around when my kids were little. So you know, it’s been around for a long time.”

She noted that the store’s selection was somehow even more meager just a few months ago, and worse still during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic — less stock was difficult to imagine.

“I hope it stays here,” Rosanne said. “Or, maybe a Walmart.”

While Kmart was never as dominant as Walmart — the Arkansas-based chain has more than 10,000 stores worldwide — it certainly held its own in the battle for New Jersey shoppers’ business through the end of the 20th Century.

Then came a financial crisis and bankruptcy in 2002 along with the closure of hundreds of stores as the company’s CEO was sued by the SEC for misleading shareholders. Sales continued to dwindle, and 326 more locations were shuttered the next year. As Target, Walmart and online shopping became more dominant, Kmart withered. The chain’s biggest impact on New Jersey in recent years was at the West Orange shop, which closed in 2020 and became a COVID-19 vaccine center for Essex County.

When reached by NJ Advance Media, Kmart declined comment on the remaining stores’ profitability or the future of the company.

Could Kmart keep on limping along, with only this lowly trio of brick-and-mortar locations as other shoppers presumably buy online? Perhaps, but judging by how little upkeep was being provided to the Westwood store, imminent closure seems far more likely.

Aiden Martin, a 19-year-old from Hillsdale, used to come to the Westwood Kmart all the time as a kid. He and friends would play hide-and-seek throughout the stores well-stocked aisles and build forts out of toilet paper, seeing if they could stay hidden even after the store had closed.

“There used to be couches everywhere. It’s kind of all gone. Gone with the times, I guess,” Martin said. “It takes a little bit of fun out of my childhood memories to see it completely dead now with nothing. Everything’s cheap. But it’s just like everything’s gone.”

Four-story luxury rental complex on former WM site?

HILLSDALE—A redevelopment proposal for a 250-unit, four-story luxury rental apartment complex spanning 5.4 acres — with potentially 400 new residents — was presented April 6 to residents who raised questions about traffic, flooding, public safety, schools, taxes, and the first-ever high-density multifamily development in town.The proposal, still being developed by Claremont Development, the borough’s conditional redeveloper for the former Waste Management site, has yet to be formally presented to the Planning B...

HILLSDALE—A redevelopment proposal for a 250-unit, four-story luxury rental apartment complex spanning 5.4 acres — with potentially 400 new residents — was presented April 6 to residents who raised questions about traffic, flooding, public safety, schools, taxes, and the first-ever high-density multifamily development in town.

The proposal, still being developed by Claremont Development, the borough’s conditional redeveloper for the former Waste Management site, has yet to be formally presented to the Planning Board for review.

The April 6 session, billed as a town forum, featured an in-person presentation in Town Hall and was aired live on Zoom. Officials said the forum, and site architectural renderings, would be posted on the borough website.

As the meeting was not an officially noticed public meeting, the mayor and Borough Council members could not comment during the session, said Joseph Baumann, borough special redevelopment counsel.

Baumann provided context on the redevelopment plan approved in early 2021, and noted that many more public meetings will occur as the proposal evolves.

Baumann said the redeveloper has not yet inked a redeveloper’s agreement with the borough.

Claremont Development said that it is negotiating with the borough’s redevelopment counsel and redevelopment financial advisor on the agreement as well as what community benefits the developer may provide to Hillsdale for an increase in density allowed under the redevelopment agreement.

The so-called bonus density provision in the Patterson Street Redevelopment Plan allows redevelopers to propose higher-density developments in exchange for providing a community benefit or benefits as mutually agreed upon by the developer and the town.

The redevelopment plan allows 28 dwelling units per acre but in certain cases. However, a bonus density of up to 60 units per acre can be permitted if the redeveloper and council agree on community benefits in exchange for the increased dwelling unit density.

While negotiations continue, the forum offered residents a first glance at what is being proposed on the former Waste Management property. The town forum featured two officials from Claremont Development, Morristown, who presented a short overview of their proposal, joined by the project’s architect, landscape architect and civil engineer.

The two officials, Richard Sciaretta and Anthony Marchigiano, showed building renderings and explained how the new high-end rental apartment building would improve the mostly industrial and commercial area with a luxury apartment complex.

The building would be designed in Second Empire style per the redevelopment plan design guidelines, and features mansard roofs throughout, bay windows, Juliette balconies, and amenities on the ground floor.

“We’ve taken a big building and we break down the scale of the architecture and try to make this as comfortable as we can for everybody,” said architect Bob Hillier of Studio: Hillier, Princeton.

One new feature, said Sciaretta, will be a public park to be built near the corner of Piermont Avenue and Patterson Street. Hillier said the building will feature towers seen off of Patterson Street, noting the structure “is a brick complex all the way around” featuring three colors of brick and external features designed to be attractive and present a residential-style feel.

Baumann said the will include 24 affordable rental apartments, which in effect fulfills the entire affordable obligation for the approximate 12-acre redevelopment zone.

Sciaretta said the developer would have its traffic engineer, John Korac, of Stonefield Engineers, immediately begin on a traffic study.

Sciaretta said that the 250 units would include single-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments, with amenities, and allocate 1.6 parking spaces per unit. Only a few three-bedroom units would be built for required affordable obligations.

Total parking would include 403 spaces in a parking deck to be built, along with 40 new spaces on nearby streets.

He said the complex would also provide spaces for electric vehicle charging stations. He said the development would manage its stormwater runoff according to state rules which mandate no net increase in runoff post-development.

Claremont officials said that construction may start by spring 2023 if plans move along and approvals are granted, and take approximately 18-20 months from start to finish.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Global Life Rejuvenation is Here to Help You Get your young life back.

Want to feel younger, want to decrease the feeling of your age. Give us a call at 866-793-9933 to chat with us, or contact us via the form below. We’re here to help in any possible way.


booking image new

Call Us

Call 866.793.9933 for a hormone
replacement consultation or email us!

Email

[email protected]

Service Areas

Copyright Global Life Rejuvenation. All rights reserved.