TRT - Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Hanover, NJ

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 HRT For Men Hanover, NJ

What is Testosterone?

Testosterone is a crucial hormone for men and plays an important role throughout the male lifespan. Most of a male's testosterone is produced through the testicles. Also called the male sex hormone, testosterone starts playing its part during puberty.

When a male goes through puberty, testosterone helps males develop:

  • Facial Hair
  • Body Hair
  • Deeper Voice
  • Muscle Strength
  • Increased Libido
  • Muscle Density

As boys turn to men and men grow older, testosterone levels deplete naturally. Sometimes, events like injuries and chronic health conditions like diabetes can lower testosterone levels. Unfortunately, when a man loses too much T, it results in hypogonadism. When this happens, the testosterone must be replaced, or the male will suffer from symptoms like muscle loss, low libido, and even depression.

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How Does TRT Work?

TRT is exactly what it sounds like: a treatment option for men that replaces testosterone so that your body regulates hormones properly and restores balance to your life. Also called androgen replacement therapy, TRT alleviates the symptoms that men experience with low T.

Originally lab-synthesized in 1935, testosterone has grown in popularity since it was produced. Today, TRT and other testosterone treatments are among the most popular prescriptions in the U.S.

Without getting too deep into the science, TRT works by giving your body the essential testosterone it needs to function correctly. As the primary androgen for both males and females, testosterone impacts many of the body's natural processes – especially those needed for overall health. For example, men with low T are more prone to serious problems like cardiovascular disease and even type-2 diabetes.

When your body quits making enough testosterone, it causes your health to suffer until a solution is presented. That's where TRT and anti-aging medicine for men can help. TRT helps balance your hormones and replenish your depleted testosterone. With time, your body will begin to heal, and many symptoms like low libido and irritability begin to diminish.

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What Causes Low T?

For men, aging is the biggest contributor to lower testosterone levels, though there are other causes like obesity, drug abuse, testicular injuries, and certain prescribed medications. Sometimes, long-term health conditions like AIDS, cirrhosis of the liver, and kidney disease can lower testosterone levels.

When a man's testosterone levels drop significantly, it alters his body's ratio of estrogen and testosterone. Lower testosterone levels cause more abdominal fat, which in turn results in increased aromatase, which converts even more testosterone into estrogen.

If you're concerned that you might have low T, you're not alone. Millions of men in the U.S. feel the same way. The best way to find out if your testosterone is low is to get your levels tested.

For sustainable testosterone replacement therapy benefits, you must consult with hormone doctors and experts like those you can find at Global Life Rejuvenation. That way, you can find the root cause of your hormone problems, and our team can craft a personalized HRT plan tailored to your needs.

 Sermorelin Hanover, NJ

Low Sex Drive

One of the most common reasons that men choose TRT is because they have lost that "spark" with their partner. It's not easy for a man to hear that they're not performing like they used to. Intimacy is a powerful part of any relationship. When a once-healthy sex life dwindles, it can cause serious relationship issues.

The good news is that low libido doesn't have to be a permanent problem. TRT and anti-aging medicines help revert hormone levels back into their normal range. When this happens, many men have a more enjoyable life full of intimacy and sex drive.

 TRT Hanover, NJ

Inability to Achieve and Maintain an Erection

Weak erections – it's an uncomfortable subject for many men in the U.S. to talk about. It's even worse to experience first-hand. You're in the midst of an intimate moment, and you can't do your part. Despite being perfectly normal, many men put blame and shame upon themselves when they can't achieve an erection. And while the inability to perform sexually can be caused by poor diet, obesity, and chronic health conditions, low testosterone is often a contributing factor.

Fortunately, weak erections are a treatable condition. The best way to regain your confidence and ability in bed is to speak with your doctor. Once any underlying conditions are discovered, options like TRT may be the best course of treatment.

Hair Loss

 Hormone Replacement  Hanover, NJ

Loss of Strength and Muscle Mass

Do you find it harder and harder to work out and lift weights in the gym? Are you having problems lifting heavy items that you once had no problem lifting?

Recent studies show that when men are inactive, they lose .5% of muscle strength every year, from ages 25 to 60. After 60, muscle loss doubles every decade. While some muscle loss is common as men age, a significant portion can be tied to low testosterone levels. When a man's T levels drop, so does his muscle mass.

Testosterone is a much-needed component used in gaining and retaining muscle mass. That's why many doctors prescribe TRT Hanover, NJ, for men having problems with strength. One recent study found that men who increased their testosterone levels using TRT gained as much as 2.5 pounds of muscle mass.

Whether your gym performance is lacking, or you can't lift heavy items like you used to, don't blame it all on age. You could be suffering from hypogonadism.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Hanover, NJ

Hair Loss

If you're like millions of other men in their late 20s and 30s, dealing with hair loss is a reality you don't want to face. Closely related to testosterone decline and hormone imbalances, hair loss is distressing for many men. This common symptom is often related to a derivative of testosterone called DHT. Excess amounts of DHT cause hair follicles to halt their production, causing follicles to die.

Because hair located at the front and crown is more sensitive to DHT, it grows slower than other follicles and eventually stops growing permanently. Thankfully, TRT and anti-aging treatments for men in Hanover, NJ, is now available to address hair loss for good.

While it's true that you can't change your genes, you can change the effects of low testosterone on your body. Whether you're suffering from thinning hair or hair loss across your entire head, TRT and other hormone therapies can stop hair loss and even reverse the process.

 TRT For Men Hanover, NJ

Gynecomastia

Also called "man boobs," gynecomastia is essentially the enlargement of male breast tissue. This increase in fatty tissue is often caused by hormonal imbalances and an increase in estrogen. For men, estrogen levels are elevated during andropause. Also called male menopause, andropause usually happens because of a lack of testosterone.

If you're a man between the ages of 40 and 55, and you're embarrassed by having large breasts, don't lose hope. TRT is a safe, effective way to eliminate the underlying cause of gynecomastia without invasive surgery. With a custom HRT and fitness program, you can bring your testosterone and estrogen levels back to normal before you know it.

 HRT For Men Hanover, NJ

Decreased Energy

Decreased energy was once considered a normal part of aging. Today, many doctors know better. Advances in technology and our understanding of testosterone show that low T and lack of energy often go hand-in-hand.

If you're struggling to enjoy activities like playing with your kids or hiking in a park due to lack of energy, it could be a sign of low T. Of course, getting tired is perfectly normal for any man. But if you're suffering from continual fatigue, a lack of enjoyment, or a decrease in energy, it might be time to speak with a doctor.

Whether you're having a tough time getting through your day or can't finish activities you used to love, TRT could help.

 Human Growth Hormone Hanover, NJ

Lack of Sleep

A study from 2011 showed that men who lose a week's worth of sleep can experience lowered testosterone levels – as much as 15%, according to experts. Additional research into the topic found almost 15% of workers only get five hours of sleep (or less) per night. These findings suggest that sleep loss negatively impacts T levels and wellbeing.

The bottom line is that men who have trouble sleeping often suffer from lower testosterone levels as a result. If you find yourself exhausted at the end of the day but toss and turn all night long, you might have low T.

TRT and anti-aging medicines can restore your T levels back to normal, which can help you sleep better with proper diet and exercise.

 Ipamorelin Hanover, NJ

Depression

You're feeling down about everything, and there's no solid explanation for why you're in such a crummy mood. Your daily life is great and full of success, but you can't help but feel unexcited and unmotivated. If you're experiencing symptoms like these, you may be depressed – and it may stem from low testosterone.

A research study from Munich found that men with depression also commonly had low testosterone levels. This same study also found that depressed men had cortisol levels that were 67% higher than other men. Because higher cortisol levels lead to lower levels of testosterone, the chances of severe depression increase.

Depression is a very real disorder and should always be diagnosed and treated by your doctor. One treatment option gaining in popularity is TRT for depression. Studies show that when TRT is used to restore hormone levels, men enjoy a lighter, more improved mood. That's great news for men who are depressed and have not had success with other treatments like anti-depression medicines, which alter the brain's chemistry.

 Sermorelin Hanover, NJ

Inability to Concentrate

Ask anyone over the age of 50 how their memory is, and they'll tell you it wasn't what it used to be. Memory loss and lack of concentration occur naturally as we age – these aren't always signs of dementia or Alzheimer's.

However, what many men consider a symptom of age may be caused by low testosterone. A 2006 study found that males with low T levels performed poorly on cognitive skill tests. These results suggest that low testosterone may play a part in reducing cognitive ability. If you're having trouble staying on task or remembering what your schedule is for the day, it might not be due to your age. It might be because your testosterone levels are too low. If you're having trouble concentrating or remembering daily tasks, it could be time to talk to your doctor.

Why? The aforementioned study found that participating men experienced improved cognitive skills when using TRT.

 TRT Hanover, NJ

Weight Gain

Even though today's society is more inclusive of large people, few adults enjoy gaining weight as they age. Despite their best efforts, many men just can't shed the extra pounds around their midsections, increasing their risk of heart disease and cancer.

Often, male weight gain is caused by hormone imbalances that slow the metabolism and cause weight to pile on. This phase of life is called andropause and happens when there is a lack of testosterone in the body. Couple that with high cortisol levels, and you've got a recipe for flabby guts and double chins.

Fortunately, TRT treatments and physician-led weight loss programs can correct hormone imbalances and lead to healthy weight loss for men.

 TRT For Men Hanover, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT For Men Hanover, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

Benefits of Sermorelin include:

  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Human Growth Hormone Hanover, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

 Ipamorelin Hanover, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it is suitable for both men and women. It provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies, boosting patients' overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life. When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits.

Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life Starts Here

Whether you are considering our TRT services, HRT for women, or our growth hormone peptide services, we are here to help. The first step to turning back the hand of time starts by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation.

Our friendly, knowledgeable TRT and HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Hanover, NJ

Balourdet Quartet will aim for transcendence at Morris Museum concert

The bright young things of the Balourdet Quartet may play different string instruments but they speak the same virtuosic language. The foursome are racking up grand prizes and gold medals for their technical prowess and musical sensibilities that are crisp and vital.Morris Township is the next stop on their whirlwind summer tour of concerts, master classes, workshops, competitions and coachings. The quartet makes its Morris Museum Lots of Strings Music Festival debut, Aug. 13 at 8 p.m., in a concert of works by Hugo Wolf, Béla ...

The bright young things of the Balourdet Quartet may play different string instruments but they speak the same virtuosic language. The foursome are racking up grand prizes and gold medals for their technical prowess and musical sensibilities that are crisp and vital.

Morris Township is the next stop on their whirlwind summer tour of concerts, master classes, workshops, competitions and coachings. The quartet makes its Morris Museum Lots of Strings Music Festival debut, Aug. 13 at 8 p.m., in a concert of works by Hugo Wolf, Béla Bartók and Ludwig van Beethoven. It will be held on the museum’s elevated parking deck, with guests invited to bring their own chairs and refreshments for live chamber music against a sunset backdrop.

In a Zoom session, violinist Justin DeFilippis shares a preview of the concert’s narrative arc. “The throughline is that each piece becomes more intense and, by the end, we’ve reached this catharsis of Beethoven’s Opus 131,” he says. “But the point of it is transcendence.

“We begin with a very light and charming appetizer, the Italian Serenade by Hugo Wolf, and going to a kind of fully inspired piece by Bartók (String Quartet No. 4 in C major), which puts the ideas of the democracy of the string quartet in its absolute limits of all of these voices interacting with each other. The Beethoven comes out of that with a perspective that it was one of the very last works he ever wrote — the second-to-last complete work, in fact — and he’s pondering the meaning of life and the transcendence of life in the face of so much of his own guilt and tragedy, and overcoming that with defiance.”

Quartet culture is unique and multifaceted. On the surface, it’s about playing hallowed chamber music repertoire with like-minded peers. At its heart, it’s about four individual voices communicating as one. Some quartets boost their collective cohesive voice over their individual ensemblist strengths, and vice versa.

It was the biggest question on my mind during my interview with the quartet. They spoke from Boston, where they are currently in residence at the New England Conservatory’s Professional String Quartet Program. Fresh-faced and dressed in T-shirts and shorts, they’re disarmingly casual — a refreshing attitude in the uber-competitive, buttoned-down domain of string players. They speak efficiently and directly. They’re effective communicators.

Angela Bae jumps right in. The Seoul-born, Los Angeles-raised violinist started playing violin at 3. At 16, she became the youngest Concertmaster of the American Youth Symphony in L.A. “I think we have different musical identities as individuals and also just how we run things,” she says, and tells me everyone’s role and how it complements their personality.

She’s the ambitious planner, handling the logistics of travel and scheduling. Cellist Russell Houston is the storyteller; he manages their social media. Talk to him for one minute and you can pinpoint his charismatic voice in the quartet’s socials — upbeat, engaging and easygoing.

“He’s very relatable and he’s a funny guy,” Bae says. “I usually don’t tell him that, but he knows how to lighten up the mood and have fun.” The Texas native picked up the cello at 10 and holds degrees from the Colburn Conservatory, Northwestern University and Rice University.

Bae calls DeFilippis the speaker. “He’s a very elegant speaker who can do things on the fly like when we speak about our program,” she says. “He’s very good at this.” By the end of the interview, it’s clear from the way he speaks passionately about music and the meaningful community partnerships they’ve forged with students and young composers. The New Jersey-born violinist attended Juilliard’s pre-college program and holds a master’s from Rice University.

Benjamin Zannoni is the stabilizer, grounded and clear-eyed. The Texas-born violist has degrees from the Manhattan School of Music, Juilliard and Rice University. “He keeps us very organized when we live together, stuff like making sure no one’s doing a ‘sleep-all-day’ kind of thing,” Bae says, laughing good-naturedly. “Dividing up these roles is always fun because you can kind of slack off but then come back and everyone’s going to be there for you. It’s always a good balance. And then you can give 100 percent of what you’re good at to help other people. It’s a good feeling. You feel like you’re needed, and you’re also being helped.”

The quartet was founded in 2018 at Rice University in Houston under the tutelage of James Dunham, Norman Fischer and Cho-Liang Lin. It was named by Bae in homage to the beloved French chef at the Hotel St. Bernard in Taos, N.M., where she attended the Taos School of Music.

DeFilippis adds that the quartet began informally as four friends who were playing chamber music in school, partially for school credit, and has evolved over the last couple of years. “We kind of just did a festival together, then a competition together, and from there, the pandemic happened and we really had to confront who we were.

“We’ve been doing a lot of self-reflection as a group in the past year, and we never really asked ourselves these kinds of questions before, because we didn’t really have time to. It was very much like, there’s a concert you have to prepare for, you just rehearse it, you get it together, you share ideas and — boom, boom, boom — you get it cleaned up. But I think now we’re in a phase of playing the same music often enough that we really do confront our own identities every time we rehearse a passage of music.”

Zannoni believes their identities were shaped through exposure to different backgrounds and training in school. “We all basically studied in a bunch of different places and I think that, in a way, brought us all with different identities already. But they were kind of things that we had taken from other people. And now as a quartet, we’re actually becoming the individuals.”

The quartet was founded on democratic ideals. That influences everything, including the approach to the music they play. Their interpretive, creative passagework is developed through a process of recognizing and encouraging each other’s musical sensibilities. Subtilties such as shaping, inflection, phrasing, articulation and harmonic shifts are open to dialogue.

“A lot of times, musically,” Zannoni says, “it’s kind of this thing where we’ll work on things and each of us will talk and whatnot. But we all keep each other in check when someone’s really invested musically in something. Another person might be more invested in something technically, or someone might be invested in something super-emotional about the music. And it’s because we’re so democratic about everything. There’s so much equal voicing that goes into things, we kind of all get to put our little two cents in about things.”

One of the biggest assets of playing in a quartet is learning how to advocate for yourself. There is no sense of anonymity in such a small, intimate group and Bae finds it enriching.

“I think it’s also really fun,” she says. “Like if I’m thinking about a note and then somebody will be like, ‘Well, how does that fit in the whole phrase?’ and I’ll be like, ‘I don’t know, it just seems like that note deserves some love.’ And you know, both things are true — it’s just what you’re in the mood for. So then I’ll start thinking, ‘Well, how does that fit to the whole movement or the whole piece?’ and then I’ll think, ‘Wow, that’s a really broad question that I wasn’t even thinking about.’ So it’s really about keeping each other in check, and the democratic view of a phrase of a note, that keeps us constantly creative.”

The quartet looks ahead by championing new works. At the end of August, they will be in Alberta, Canada, for the Banff International String Quartet Competition, the largest quartet competition in North America. As one of the BISQC 2022 Competing Quartets, they are required to play two works (out of seven total) by living composers; one will be a new commission piece for the competition by Dinuk Wijeratne. Next year, they will premiere a new commission work by Karim Al-Zand, made possible through Chamber Music America’s Classical Commissioning Grant.

As we wrap up the interview, Houston flashes a big smile. “There are fun facts we want to tell you about Justin,” he says, and playfully nudges DeFilippis, who shares that he is a New Jersey native. He grew up in Hanover Township and his family still lives in the area. “My parents are super, super excited to have us perform less than 10 minutes from my house,” he says. He reminisces about childhood visits with his family to the Morris Museum, a highlight being the intricate Mega Model Train Gallery, part of the museum’s permanent collection.

The warmth in DeFilippis’ voice does not waver when he speaks about his family and his quartet mates, and one thing becomes very clear: the quartet isn’t just a collection of musicians. It’s a family.

“We’ve kind of formed this hive mind identity where home is wherever the four of us are,” he says. “We’re kind of each other’s siblings at this point.”

For more on the concert, visit morrismuseum.org.

For more on The Balourdet Quartet, visit balourdetquartet.com.

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Kessler Foundation neuroimaging study reveals fatigue-related differences by age and gender

East Hanover, NJ. August 5, 2022. To study the relationship between age and fatigue, Kessler Foundation researchers conducted a novel study using neuroimaging and self-report data. Their findings were published online on May 9, 2022, in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience in the open access article, “Fatigue across the lifespan in men and women: State vs. trait” (doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2022.790006).The authors...

East Hanover, NJ. August 5, 2022. To study the relationship between age and fatigue, Kessler Foundation researchers conducted a novel study using neuroimaging and self-report data. Their findings were published online on May 9, 2022, in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience in the open access article, “Fatigue across the lifespan in men and women: State vs. trait” (doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2022.790006).

The authors are Glenn Wylie, DPhil, Amanda Pra Sisto, Helen M. Genova, PhD, and John DeLuca, PhD, of Kessler Foundation. All have faculty appointments at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. Dr. Wylie is also a research scientist at The Department of Veterans’ Affairs War-related Injury and Illness Study Center at the New Jersey Healthcare System.

Their study is the first to report the effects of gender and age on both ‘state’ and ‘trait’ fatigue, and the first to report fatigue-related differences in brain activation across the lifespan and across gender during a cognitively fatiguing task. “State” measure of fatigue assesses a subject’s instantaneous experience of fatigue at the time of testing; “trait” measure of fatigue assesses how much fatigue a subject experienced over a longer period of time, such as the previous four weeks.

Researchers collected data on trait fatigue and state fatigue from 43 healthy men and women aged 20 to 63 years. State fatigue was measured during fMRI scans while participants performed a cognitively challenging task. The study was conducted at the Rocco Ortenzio Neuroimaging Center at Kessler Foundation, a specialized facility dedicated solely to rehabilitation research. They found that older individuals reported less state fatigue.

Dr. Wylie, director of the Ortenzio Center, commented: “Our neuroimaging data show that the role of middle frontal areas of the brain changes with age. Younger individuals may use these areas to combat fatigue, but this is not the case with older individuals. Moreover, these results suggest that women show greater resilience when faced with a fatiguing task."

“This study is an important first step toward explaining some of the differences reported in the literature of fatigue, by showing that state and trait measures of fatigue measure different aspects of fatigue, and that age and gender both appear to affect the relationship between state fatigue and brain activation,” Dr. Wyle concluded.

Funding: National MS Society (RG 4232A1), New Jersey Commission for Brain Injury Research (10.005.BIR1), Department of Veterans’ Affairs (5I01CX000893), and Kessler Foundation

Learn more about ongoing studies at Kessler Foundation at Join Our Research Studies | Kessler Foundation

About Kessler Foundation

Kessler Foundation, a major nonprofit organization in the field of disability, is a global leader in rehabilitation research that improves cognition, mobility and long-term outcomes, including employment, for people with neurological disabilities caused by diseases and injuries of the brain and spinal cord. Kessler Foundation leads the nation in funding innovative programs that expand opportunities for employment for people with disabilities. Learn more by visiting http://www.KesslerFoundation.org

Graphic: Glenn Wylie, DPhil

Dr. Wylie serves as director of the Rocco Ortenzio Neuroimaging Center at Kessler Foundation. He is also a research scientist at The Department of Veterans’ Affairs War-related Injury and Illness Study Center in the VA New Jersey Healthcare System.

Fatigue across the lifespan in men and women: State vs. trait

Kushner breaks ground on 265-unit luxury complex in East Hanover

In what sure feels like an increasing trend in northern New Jersey, Kushner has begun the demolition of an aging suburban office building in East Hanover — the first step in creating a 265-unit luxury apartment complex.The project, at 72 Eagle Rock Ave., is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2025.The new community will feature a mix of one- to three-bedroom residences housed in four separate four-story buildings — with 53 apartments set...

In what sure feels like an increasing trend in northern New Jersey, Kushner has begun the demolition of an aging suburban office building in East Hanover — the first step in creating a 265-unit luxury apartment complex.

The project, at 72 Eagle Rock Ave., is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2025.

The new community will feature a mix of one- to three-bedroom residences housed in four separate four-story buildings — with 53 apartments set aside for affordable housing.

Michael Sommer, executive vice president, development and construction, at Kushner, said the project will have great impact in a Morris County town where many are looking for premier residences.

“Today’s groundbreaking is an exciting milestone for our company and for the township, as we take the next step to develop the first luxury rental apartments ever to be constructed in East Hanover,” he said.

“East Hanover is highly desired by residents who appreciate its small-town, suburban charm in the heart of Morris County. We look forward to adding a new, modern residential option that will appeal to both existing residents and those who will be attracted to this incredible location.”

Morris County Commissioner Stephen Shaw said the transformation of outdated office space for much-needed residential is welcomed.

“(This) wasn’t viable before the pandemic,” he said. “But now, after the pandemic, with work from home, it certainly now is extremely outdated. Office vacancy rates in the area are at an all-time high and apartment vacancy is at an all-time low, and there’s an extreme need for housing in this region.

“That’s why I’m delighted to be here today as we witness this vacant, outdated commercial site that’s going to begin the transformation today to become modern, energy-efficient multifamily housing, which is in high demand in this area. The sharp rise in home prices and interest rates have bolstered the appeal of rental properties for everyone from young professionals to empty-nesters, while providing a well-balanced lifestyle through modern amenities and services.”

Kushner officials hope the resident experience will be further enhanced by a robust amenity offering.

A striking clubhouse will serve as the social and recreational heart of the community, with a modern fitness center including a studio for yoga and fitness on demand, a theater room and residents-only clubroom. There also will be expanded work-from-home spaces, including a conference room and coworking rooms.

Outside, residents will enjoy an expansive sun deck and sparkling pool with pergolas, grilling stations, fire pits, a movie screen, pingpong table and a walking path meandering around the scenic property. Other services will include TULU, an on-demand smart rental offering for high-quality household and lifestyle products.

The community’s location is minutes from Interstate 280 — which means it’s close to Newark and New York City. And it’s not far from Morristown, about 8 miles away.

Kushner President Nicole Kushner Meyer feels the property will fill a need.

“It is amazing to see the growth and development that East Hanover has had over the years, and I am proud that we are breaking ground today on a highly designed and fully amenitized multifamily project,” she said. “We have set the bar incredibly high in designing this East Hanover project to appeal to the modern customer.”

Baseball: Caldwell tops Hanover Park for North 2, Group 2 title

Playing in its first sectional title in eight years, top-seeded Caldwell defeated third-seeded Hanover Park, 6-3, in the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 2 tournament final in Caldwell.Stranding baserunners doomed Hanover Park (19-6-1) as it finished the game leaving 12 runners on with a key sequence coming in the first inning.“Up 1-0 in the first with bases loaded a hit could’ve broken the game open but we stranded baserunners and didn’t get that timely hit,” Hanover Park manager Doug Wear said. “We...

Playing in its first sectional title in eight years, top-seeded Caldwell defeated third-seeded Hanover Park, 6-3, in the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 2 tournament final in Caldwell.

Stranding baserunners doomed Hanover Park (19-6-1) as it finished the game leaving 12 runners on with a key sequence coming in the first inning.

“Up 1-0 in the first with bases loaded a hit could’ve broken the game open but we stranded baserunners and didn’t get that timely hit,” Hanover Park manager Doug Wear said. “We put the ball in play and they made plays, we just couldn’t get one to fall and they owned the base paths.”

Caldwell (24-7) immediately made the Hornets pay as it took a 2-1 lead in the home half of the frame thanks to a pair of RBI doubles from Ty Fredo and Nick Bergamotto. Bergamotto added another run in the third to give the Chiefs a 3-1 lead.

The final three outs did not come easy for Caldwell as Hanover Park scored two runs in the top of the seventh and had the tying run at the plate with no outs. However, that was as far as the Hornets could get as Caldwell hung on and snapped their seven-game winning streak.

“They’re going to be well-coached and make all the plays so our game plan was to have a good approach, put the ball in play, and make them make plays,” Caldwell manager Ryan Smith said. “Also, get on base and use our speed to our advantage.”

Caldwell’s Ray Zamloot earned the win pitching six innings and allowing six hits, three runs (two earned), seven walks, and four strikeouts. He also helped his cause with a two-run single in the fifth inning to give his team a 6-1 advantage.

Despite failing to record an out in the final inning, Zamloot made his intentions clear.

“He said ‘I just want to let you know I’m going back in for the seventh’ so we let him go back out,” Caldwell manager Ryan Smith said. “He’s been the guy to get the ball in a lot of big games this year.”

Dan Paris would come in and shut the door on 16 pitches and allowed one hit.

“Our motto all year has been to trust the guy next to you,” Smith added. “We lost in the semifinals last year but I told the team ‘we have the talent to be here again next year, it’s not going to be easy, you gotta put in the time and work.’”

Quality pitching has been a theme for the Chiefs as they have not allowed more than three runs since their 5-3 loss against St. Joseph (Mont.) on May 19 and are in the midst of an eight-game winning streak.

“You have a goal to bring a title it feels really good to accomplish that goal but it wasn’t easy,” Smith said. “You play really good teams so we prepared and worked hard at practice.”

Despite only losing two seniors, Hanover Park will be without a key component next year as Mike Filippone finished his final season leading the team in hits (39), home runs (3), runs (36), and RBI (30).

“We had 19 wins after coming off a year where we had 21,” Wear said. “These kids have nothing to hang their heads about, they were a whole new group who battled and got better as the season went along.”

Caldwell advances to the Group 2 semifinals on Monday at home (North 2 and South Jersey teams are the designated home teams this season). It will play the winner between Ramsey and Westwood.

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Dooley’s heroics lift Hanover Park to North 2, Group 2 softball title

Gina Lagravenis started the season as a slap hitter but as it progressed, there was a sense a change was needed.Hanover Park coach Sergio Rodriguez felt it and so did she, and so she transitioned back to hitting righty near the tail end of April.The move paid dividends and the sophomore has become a much bigger threat at the bottom of the lineup. After hitting .250 in her first 11 games, the sophomore has hit at a .317 pace in 16 games since.On Thursday, she provided the biggest spark of the season when the Hornets neede...

Gina Lagravenis started the season as a slap hitter but as it progressed, there was a sense a change was needed.

Hanover Park coach Sergio Rodriguez felt it and so did she, and so she transitioned back to hitting righty near the tail end of April.

The move paid dividends and the sophomore has become a much bigger threat at the bottom of the lineup. After hitting .250 in her first 11 games, the sophomore has hit at a .317 pace in 16 games since.

On Thursday, she provided the biggest spark of the season when the Hornets needed it most.

With Hanover Park trailing by three in the seventh inning, Lagravenis slugged a lead-off homer to flip the order to Peyton Sward at the top. It’s her second homer of the season and both have come in the last three games.

At that moment, a rally was born.

“I’m so happy that I could start it,” Lagravenis said. “I was not thinking home run as the nine batter. I was just thinking contact up the middle and it worked out really well for me.”

Sward and Molly Cocco came through with hits of their own to put Alyza Dooley into the spotlight. She wouldn’t let that spotlight go.

The junior tied the game with a two-run double and then supplied more heroics with a walk-off single in the bottom of the ninth to lift second-seeded Hanover Park to a North Jersey 2, Group 2 title in East Hanover.

It’s the program’s first sectional title since 2018.

“I think it really hit us when Gina hit the home run,” Dooley said. “That was huge, our small sophomore who started as a slapper in the beginning of the year. Seeing her hit with power we had to back her up.”

Dooley has now hit safely in seven consecutive games and balloons her average to .449 on the season, up from the .242 she posted as a sophomore. Eggs and bacon for breakfast ended up being a recipe for success and perhaps a good-luck charm.

Dooley, like the rest of her teammates, found success after gradually making adjustments over the course of the game.

Despite not finding success early on thanks in part to some stellar defense on Bernards’ part, the team knew the runs would come. The team did average 9.08 runs per game after all.

“I’m a big believer that you are who you are as a team and we hit the whole year,” said Rodriguez. “We just hit. I didn’t see a way we weren’t going to play seven innings and not ring the bell.”

Adriana Carter also homered in the win and Sward finished with three hits and an RBI. Both are also enjoying more success at the plate. For Carter, she’s batting .425, up from .338 in 2021, with eight more home runs and 22 more RBI.

Sward’s average climbed from .405 to .564 with 20 more runs and 23 more stolen bases.

“I think it’s the coaching to start,” Sward said. “They’ve raised our morale, boosted our confidence. We’re playing together as a team. We all had good years last year but together we’re having better seasons. It’s exciting.”

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