HRT - Hormone Replacement Therapy in Hillsdale, NJ

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What Causes Menopause?

The most common reason for menopause is the natural decline in a female's reproductive hormones. However, menopause can also result from the following situations:

Oophorectomy: This surgery, which removes a woman's ovaries, causes immediate menopause. Symptoms and signs of menopause in this situation can be severe, as the hormonal changes happen abruptly.

Chemotherapy: Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can induce menopause quickly, causing symptoms to appear shortly after or even during treatment.

Ovarian Insufficiency: Also called premature ovarian failure, this condition is essentially premature menopause. It happens when a woman's ovaries quit functioning before the age of 40 and can stem from genetic factors and disease. Only 1% of women suffer from premature menopause, but HRT can help protect the heart, brain, and bones.

 Human Growth Hormone Hillsdale, NJ

Depression

If you're a woman going through menopause and find that you have become increasingly depressed, you're not alone. It's estimated that 15% of women experience depression to some degree while going through menopause. What many women don't know is that depression can start during perimenopause, or the years leading up to menopause.

Depression can be hard to diagnose, especially during perimenopause and menopause. However, if you notice the following signs, it might be time to speak with a physician:

  • Mood Swings
  • Inappropriate Guilt
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Too Much or Too Little Sleep
  • Lack of Interest in Life
  • Overwhelming Feelings

Remember, if you're experiencing depression, you're not weak or broken - you're going through a very regular emotional experience. The good news is that with proper treatment from your doctor, depression isn't a death sentence. And with HRT and anti-aging treatment for women, depression could be the catalyst you need to enjoy a new lease on life.

 HRT For Women Hillsdale, NJ

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes - they're one of the most well-known symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are intense, sudden feelings of heat across a woman's upper body. Some last second, while others last minutes, making them incredibly inconvenient and uncomfortable for most women.

Symptoms of hot flashes include:

  • Sudden, Overwhelming Feeling of Heat
  • Anxiety
  • High Heart Rate
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

Typically, hot flashes are caused by a lack of estrogen. Low estrogen levels negatively affect a woman's hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls body temperature and appetite. Low estrogen levels cause the hypothalamus to incorrectly assume the body is too hot, dilating blood vessels to increase blood flow. Luckily, most women don't have to settle for the uncomfortable feelings that hot flashes cause. HRT treatments for women often stabilize hormones, lessening the effects of hot flashes and menopause in general.

 Ipamorelin Hillsdale, NJ

Mood Swings

Mood swings are common occurrences for most people - quick shifts from happy to angry and back again, triggered by a specific event. And while many people experience mood swings, they are particularly common for women going through menopause. That's because, during menopause, the female's hormones are often imbalanced. Hormone imbalances and mood swings go hand-in-hand, resulting in frequent mood changes and even symptoms like insomnia.

The rate of production of estrogen, a hormone that fluctuates during menopause, largely determines the rate of production the hormone serotonin, which regulates mood, causing mood swings.

Luckily, HRT and anti-aging treatments in Hillsdale, NJ for women work wonders for mood swings by regulating hormone levels like estrogen. With normal hormone levels, women around the world are now learning that they don't have to settle for mood swings during menopause.

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Weight Gain

Staying fit and healthy is hard for anyone living in modern America. However, for women with hormone imbalances during perimenopause or menopause, weight gain is even more serious. Luckily, HRT treatments for women coupled with a physician-led diet can help keep weight in check. But which hormones need to be regulated?

  • Estrogen: During menopause, estrogen levels are depleted. As such, the body must search for other sources of estrogen. Because estrogen is stored in fat, your body believes it should increase fat production during menopause. Estrogen also plays a big part in insulin resistance, which can make it even harder to lose weight and keep it off.
  • Progesterone: Progesterone levels are also depleted during menopause. Progesterone depletion causes bloating and water retention, while loss of testosterone limits the body's ability to burn calories.
  • Ongoing Stress: Stress makes our bodies think that food is hard to come by, putting our bodies in "survival mode". When this happens, cortisol production is altered. When cortisol timing changes, the energy in the bloodstream is diverted toward making fat. With chronic stress, this process repeatedly happens, causing extensive weight gain during menopause.
 HRT Hillsdale, NJ

Low Libido

Lowered sexual desire - three words most men and women hate to hear. Unfortunately, for many women in perimenopausal and menopausal states, it's just a reality of life. Thankfully, today, HRT and anti-aging treatments Hillsdale, NJ can help women maintain a normal, healthy sex drive. But what causes low libido in women, especially as they get older?

The hormones responsible for low libido in women are progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone.

Progesterone production decreases during perimenopause, causing low sex drive in women. Lower progesterone production can also cause chronic fatigue, weight gain, and other symptoms. On the other hand, lower estrogen levels during menopause lead to vaginal dryness and even vaginal atrophy or loss of muscle tension.

Lastly, testosterone plays a role in lowered libido. And while testosterone is often grouped as a male hormone, it contributes to important health and regulatory functionality in women. A woman's testosterone serves to heighten sexual responses and enhances orgasms. When the ovaries are unable to produce sufficient levels of testosterone, it often results in a lowered sex drive.

 Hormone Replacement Hillsdale, NJ

Vaginal Dryness

Often uncomfortable and even painful, vaginal dryness is a serious problem for sexually active women. However, like hair loss in males, vaginal dryness is very common - almost 50% of women suffer from it during menopause.

Getting older is just a part of life, but that doesn't mean you have to settle for the side effects. HRT and anti-aging treatments for women correct vaginal dryness by re-balancing estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. When supplemented with diet and healthy living, your vagina's secretions are normalized, causing discomfort to recede.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Hillsdale, NJ

Fibroids

Uterine fibroids - they're perhaps the least-known symptom of menopause and hormone imbalances in women. That's because these growths on the uterus are often symptom-free. Unfortunately, these growths can be cancerous, presenting a danger for women as they age.

Many women will have fibroids at some point. Because they're symptomless, they're usually found during routine doctor exams. Some women only get one or two, while others may have large clusters of fibroids. Because fibroids are usually caused by hormone imbalances, hysterectomies have been used as a solution, forcing women into early menopause.

Advances in HRT and anti-aging medicine for women give females a safer, non-surgical option without having to experience menopause early. At Global Life Rejuvenation, our expert physicians will implement a customized HRT program to stabilize your hormones and reduce the risk of cancerous fibroid growth.

 HRT For Men Hillsdale, NJ

Endometriosis

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS, and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Endometriosis symptoms are much like the effects of PMS and include pelvic pain, fatigue, cramping, and bloating. While doctors aren't entirely sure what causes this painful, uncomfortable condition, most agree that hormones - particularly xenoestrogens - play a factor.

Xenoestrogen is a hormone that is very similar to estrogen. Too much xenoestrogen is thought to stimulate endometrial tissue growth. HRT for women helps balance these hormones and, when used with a custom nutrition program, can provide relief for women across the U.S.

 Sermorelin Hillsdale, NJ

What is Sermorelin?

Sermorelin is a synthetic hormone peptide, like GHRH, which triggers the release of growth hormones. When used under the care of a qualified physician, Sermorelin can help you lose weight, increase your energy levels, and help you feel much younger.

 HRT Hillsdale, NJ

Benefits of Sermorelin

Human growth hormone (HGH) therapy has been used for years to treat hormone deficiencies. Unlike HGH, which directly replaces declining human growth hormone levels, Sermorelin addresses the underlying cause of decreased HGH, stimulating the pituitary gland naturally. This approach keeps the mechanisms of growth hormone production active.

  • Benefits of Sermorelin include:
  • Better Immune Function
  • Improved Physical Performance
  • More Growth Hormone Production
  • Less Body Fat
  • Build More Lean Muscle
  • Better Sleep
 Hormone Replacement Hillsdale, NJ

What is Ipamorelin?

Ipamorelin helps to release growth hormones in a person's body by mimicking a peptide called ghrelin. Ghrelin is one of three hormones which work together to regulate the growth hormone levels released by the pituitary gland. Because Ipamorelin stimulates the body to produce growth hormone, your body won't stop its natural growth hormone production, which occurs with synthetic HGH.

Ipamorelin causes growth hormone secretion that resembles natural release patterns rather than being constantly elevated from HGH. Because ipamorelin stimulates the natural production of growth hormone, our patients can use this treatment long-term with fewer health risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Hillsdale, NJ

Benefits of Ipamorelin

One of the biggest benefits of Ipamorelin is that it provides significant short and long-term benefits in age management therapies. Ipamorelin can boost a patient's overall health, wellbeing, and outlook on life.

When growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland using Ipamorelin, clients report amazing benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Powerful Anti-Aging Properties
  • More Muscle Mass
  • Less Unsightly Body Fat
  • Deep, Restful Sleep
  • Increased Athletic Performance
  • More Energy
  • Less Recovery Time for Training Sessions and Injuries
  • Enhanced Overall Wellness and Health
  • No Significant Increase in Cortisol

Your New, Youthful Lease on Life with HRT for Women

Whether you are considering our HRT and anti-aging treatments for women in Hillsdale, NJ, we are here to help. The first step to reclaiming your life begins by contacting Global Life Rejuvenation. Our friendly, knowledgeable HRT experts can help answer your questions and walk you through our procedures. From there, we'll figure out which treatments are right for you. Before you know it, you'll be well on your way to looking and feeling better than you have in years!

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Latest News in Hillsdale, NJ

Meal Train Started For Westwood Mother Diagnosed With Stage 4 Cancer

A meal train was established for the Westwood mother of a 3-year-old boy, after she was diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer. WESTWOOD, NJ — A few weeks ago, Irene Gol, the Westwood mother of a 3-year-old boy named Zion and a medic at nearby Holy Name Medical Center, received a life-changing cancer diagnosis.Since then, a "meal train" was established for Gol by her friend Jacqueline Klein on July 17 to help her and her ...

A meal train was established for the Westwood mother of a 3-year-old boy, after she was diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer.

WESTWOOD, NJ — A few weeks ago, Irene Gol, the Westwood mother of a 3-year-old boy named Zion and a medic at nearby Holy Name Medical Center, received a life-changing cancer diagnosis.

Since then, a "meal train" was established for Gol by her friend Jacqueline Klein on July 17 to help her and her son with pre-made meals delivered right to her home, and, what's more, over $1,700 was raised for her by the community.

Klein met Gol through their sons' "Little Warriors" class at Gary Stevens Tae Kwon Do in Glen Rock, and when she heard about Gol, she said, she wanted to help in some way.

"The thought of missing any time with my children, of being faced with the prospect of not watching them grow up, brings actual tears to my eyes," Klein said. "That this is something that Irene is facing shatters my

Gol, described by others as the "hardworking, loving" mom of Zion, was diagnosed a few weeks ago with Anaplastic Astrocytoma stage 4, a rare type of brain cancer, Klein said on the Meal Train Plus page organized for Gol.

As 29-year-old Gol undergoes intensive chemotherapy and radiation over the next several weeks, the page said she could use a "helping hand" to feed herself and her son.

Since July 16, friends and neighbors have provided her with daily dinners through the meal train, some of which have included salmon, taco casserole and turkey chili.

As of Friday, no one has yet to volunteer to provide her with a meal after Aug. 6. However, $1,721 has so far been raised for Gol, who had planned to begin her studies in August to become a physician assistant specializing in neuro-oncology.

"I'm brought to tears at how many people are seeing me through this incredibly difficult process," Gol said in a post on July 17. "I don't know where to begin to thank you all for the amazing words, prayers and all of your kindness. Thank you for making my fighting chance against this ugly thing that much better. Thank you simply isn't enough."

High levels of PFAS chemicals found in 34 NJ drinking water systems affecting 500K+ people

Dozens of New Jersey water systems that serve a combined 500,000 residents exceeded new stringent standards last year for PFAS, a family of chemicals that have been linked to cancer and other ailments, environmental officials said Tuesday.Higher levels were found in 34 community water systems, including several in Bergen County that now face millions of dollars in expenses to buy filtering equipment. ...

Dozens of New Jersey water systems that serve a combined 500,000 residents exceeded new stringent standards last year for PFAS, a family of chemicals that have been linked to cancer and other ailments, environmental officials said Tuesday.

Higher levels were found in 34 community water systems, including several in Bergen County that now face millions of dollars in expenses to buy filtering equipment. The largest water provider that exceeded the standard was the Middlesex Water Company, which serves 233,000 people.

State officials are still formulating a statewide cleanup plan, but a lot of that hinges on lawsuits filed by the Murphy administration against DuPont, 3M and other companies that used PFAS chemicals for decades in manufacturing everyday products such as nonstick pans, polishes, waxes, paints and cleaning products.

"The folks that put this material into the chain of commerce are responsible," Shawn LaTourette, commissioner of the Department of Environmental Protection, said in a conference call with reporters.

The new data, which can be found at the DEP's Water Watch database, comes after New Jersey in 2020 formally adopted some of the most stringent drinking water standards in the nation for two PFAS chemicals: PFOA and PFOS.

PFOA has been a key ingredient for nonstick cookware, and PFOS was used in metal plating and firefighting foam. They are known as "forever chemicals" because they are very difficult to break down.

The chemicals have been found throughout the world, from the fish in the Delaware River to polar bears in the Arctic. In 2019 it was estimated that one in five New Jerseyans received water with at least trace amounts of PFAS chemicals.

Water systems across New Jersey found that they were exceeding the new standard during their annual testing in 2021. Most were smaller, well-based systems. Notices have gone out to hundreds of thousands of residents, causing concern in many towns.

Many of the 34 community water systems are very small, serving only a few hundred people. But 19 serve at least one town or even several, such as Ridgewood Water, which provides water to Glen Rock, Midland Park, Wyckoff and its namesake.

Now water utilities are looking at costly upgrades to reduce the presence of the chemicals before they reach a homeowner's tap.

Garfield officials said it would cost the city $2 million for new filtering equipment after notices went out last summer over PFAS levels. Ridgewood spent at least $3.5 million in 2019 to install carbon filters to deal with elevated levels.

Those kinds of costs prompted voters in Allendale to approve the sale of their municipal water system in November to Suez, the multinational corporation that operates the Oradell Reservoir.

In West Milford, the Passaic Valley Water Commission has been testing filters in an attempt to reduce levels in one area.

Granulated carbon filters and other methods like ion exchanges appear to be successful at lowering PFAS levels.

Suez has spent almost $5 million through 2021 on PFAS treatment systems at its smaller drinking water systems. Systems installed in West Milford neighborhoods resulted in undetectable levels of PFAS and all parts of its system are in compliance with DEP standards, said Debra Vial, a company spokeswoman.

Suez plans to spend another $25 million into 2023 to complete filtration projects in Highlands communities, Franklin Lakes and eventually Allendale, when the sale goes through.

"This issue was one of the main reasons the borough decided to sell the system," Vial said. "Standalone systems don’t always have the expertise or the funding needed to build these treatment systems."

Larger utilities with exceedances

Some of the largest water utilities that exceeded the state PFAS standard in 2021:

North Jersey

Central Jersey

South Jersey

Note: DEP data says Bellmawr and Gloucester City are now in compliance with state standards.

Scott Fallon has covered the COVID-19 pandemic since its onset in March 2020. To get unlimited access to the latest news about the pandemic's impact on New Jersey, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

With 14 recent drownings in N.J., experts warn of rip currents, swimming without guards

It’s been a deadly start to the swimming season at New Jersey’s beaches, rivers and lakes with at least a dozen drownings since late April.There have also been at least two pool deaths, bringing the total to at least 14 drownings before the official start of summer.The victims have spanned ages and locations, from out-of-state visitors in their teens to New Jersey residents spending a day at the Jersey Shore.Though the drownings all occurred under different circumstances, lifeguards and experts say swimming c...

It’s been a deadly start to the swimming season at New Jersey’s beaches, rivers and lakes with at least a dozen drownings since late April.

There have also been at least two pool deaths, bringing the total to at least 14 drownings before the official start of summer.

The victims have spanned ages and locations, from out-of-state visitors in their teens to New Jersey residents spending a day at the Jersey Shore.

Though the drownings all occurred under different circumstances, lifeguards and experts say swimming can be particularly dangerous this time of year.

Everything from the water temperature to the prevalence of rip currents in the ocean can increase the likelihood of a drowning, said Long Beach Township lifeguard coordinator Josh Bligh.

Rip currents can form right off the beach, especially when the waves are rougher or winds are high, Bligh said. People might swim out to a sandbar during low tide without realizing the danger of being caught in a rip current.

And when the water is colder, people become more easily fatigued and are more likely to experience hypothermia, he said. Both of those conditions— along with the absence of lifeguards on many beaches, lakes and pools before the season fully starts— can make people unaware of the water’s hidden dangers.

Some people are also tempted to swim on unguarded beaches in areas where full-time lifeguards will not be on duty until after schools let out and lifeguard stands are fully staffed.

“Honestly it hasn’t changed,” said Bligh, who has worked as a lifeguard for more than 20 years. “As long as people continue to go into the water when a lifeguard isn’t present, they more or less have to take on that responsibility.”

The variables that can increase the likelihood of drowning are still present when lifeguards are watching swimmers, he noted, but in those cases, guards are able to help immediately.

“I don’t think people really realize the danger of water,” he added.

The recent drownings in New Jersey have included 19-year-old Pennsylvania man drowned near a Wildwood beach in early June. A week later, a 53-year-old man, also from Pennsylvania, drowned while swimming in Wildwood Crest.

Soon after, a third person, a 45-year-old man from Hillsdale, drowned in Wildwood.

Others drowned while swimming in Belmar (a 24-year-old Lake Hopatcong man), at Island Beach State Park (a 59-year-old woman), in a Woodland Park reservoir (a 15-year-old boy) and in different lakes across the state.

In April, a high school senior drowned in a pond in New Milford, after going to retrieve a soccer ball. The next month, a man’s body was recovered in the Passaic River in Newark. A 55-year-old man died after being pulled from the Delaware River in Carneys Point Township.

And in June, a man drowned while trying to swim across a Manchester Township, and a teenager and 22-year-old drowned in a Morris County lake.

Two brothers also died at an indoor pool at a Bayonne school in early June after lifeguards pulled them from the deep end.

Though the circumstances surrounding the 14 drownings varied widely, in many of the cases there were no lifeguards present or the victims were swimming in a place where they should not have been in the water.

It’s difficult to determine trends among the recent ocean drownings at the Jersey Shore, but rip currents remain a danger, said Stockton University Coastal Research Center director and founder Stewart Farrell.

Dangerous currents dissipate after a storm is over, but not for at least five or six hours, he said. Rough waves can also factor into the creation of a rip current.

“(Waves) can keep generating riptides, but it depends on the beach,” he said.

Despite the recent string of drownings across the state, New Jersey is not known as a state with a high number of water-related deaths.

The annual age-adjusted drowning death rate nationwide from 2015 to 2019, including boating-related drowning deaths, was 1.23 deaths per 100,000 people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In New Jersey, that rate was 0.67 deaths per 100,000 people, far below the nationwide average.

And between 2010 and 2022, the state averaged seven ocean drownings, six reservoir or lake drownings and nine river drownings a year, according to preliminary data from the Department of Health.

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High School Rankings: Where Pascack Valley Falls On U.S. News List

The annual ranking released by U.S. News and World Report evaluates schools based on graduation rates, academic performance and more.HILLSDALE, NJ — Pascack Valley High School is the 119th best high school in New Jersey, according to U.S. News & World Report. The publication's new rankings include nearly 24,000 high schools across the nation.This year, there were 406 schools ranked in New Jersey....

The annual ranking released by U.S. News and World Report evaluates schools based on graduation rates, academic performance and more.

HILLSDALE, NJ — Pascack Valley High School is the 119th best high school in New Jersey, according to U.S. News & World Report. The publication's new rankings include nearly 24,000 high schools across the nation.

This year, there were 406 schools ranked in New Jersey.

The 2022 ranking of best high schools is intended to show how well the nation's public schools serve all students, regardless of achievement level, by teaching them basic skills and preparing them for college-level work, according to a news release from U.S. News.

Families can also use the rankings to see how schools compare at the national, state and local levels on factors such as graduation rates and college readiness.

You can see the full list of Bergen County schools here.

Pascack Valley was ranked number 2,898 nationally.

Ninety percent of the rankings incorporate performances on AP and IB exams and standardized tests, while the remaining 10 percent is the graduation rate. The rankings incorporate six categories:

The data used in this year's ranking is from the 2019-20 academic school year. U.S. News adjusted its calculation of these measures to account for the impact COVID-19 had on schools in the 2019-20 school year.

Read more: These NJ High Schools Are Among 2022's Best: U.S. News

Since most states closed schools for in-person instruction starting in March 2020 — typically just before most states conduct assessments — the U.S. Department of Education granted waivers allowing all states to forgo state testing for the 2019-20 school year.

Read more about the methodology here.

But, U.S. News & World Report school rankings have their critics. James Fallows, a former U.S. News editor, even called them "meaningless" in an interview with NPR.

"The reason they started doing it back in the early 1980s under the guidance of a man named Mel Elfin, was because it was a brilliant business strategy," Fallows said. "By appealing to the human desire for rankings and knowing where you stand and where somebody else stands, they were able to make a very strong part of their business, which is now basically the only part of their business."

U.S. News, however, contends that the rankings help parents make better-informed decisions about their children's education.

"The goal is to provide a clear, unbiased picture," the report says, "of how well public schools serve all of their students — from the highest to lowest achieving — in preparing them to demonstrate proficiency in basic skills as well as readiness for college-level work."

In addition to the national rankings, U.S. News also published rankings at the state, metro area and school district levels. Only metro areas and school districts with three or more high schools were included in these subrankings.

Signature School in Indiana is at the top of the list for charter schools, and Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia is the No. 1 magnet school. The Davidson Academy of Nevada is the top STEM school.

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Arroyo: Relief possible for Westwood–Hillsdale flooding

PASCACK VALLEY—Westwood Mayor Ray Arroyo took to Facebook to apprise residents after what he called the most recent “no-name storm” caused flooding in the Westwood–Hillsdale area over Memorial Day weekend.He compared his borough’s office of emergency management response with that of neighboring Hillsdale — both boroughs no stranger to flood issues — and said he is among those “again press[ing] for the only immediate relief measure that can mitigate our local flooding problem — whic...

PASCACK VALLEY—Westwood Mayor Ray Arroyo took to Facebook to apprise residents after what he called the most recent “no-name storm” caused flooding in the Westwood–Hillsdale area over Memorial Day weekend.

He compared his borough’s office of emergency management response with that of neighboring Hillsdale — both boroughs no stranger to flood issues — and said he is among those “again press[ing] for the only immediate relief measure that can mitigate our local flooding problem — which requires legislative intervention.”

Arroyo clarified his remarks for Pascack Press, saying “Saturday’s event was a clear demonstration of how a year-round lower elevation at the Woodcliff Lake Reservoir could avoid repetitive flooding from what should have been a manageable event.”

He said the 2.8 inches of rain that fell over 24 hours “might not have even breached the banks of the Pascack Brook had the winter elevation of 91 feet been maintained year-round.

“At the summer elevation of 94 feet, the Friday evening rain alone quickly filled that limited freeboard and began cascading over the fully deployed gates (95 feet) at around 2 a.m. Saturday.”

Arroyo said, “With 21 storms predicted this hurricane season, the reasonable expectation of replenishment makes maintaining the higher ‘summer’ water level unconscionable. In another scenario that might seem like the intentional infliction of emotional harm.”

Arroyo told residents the borough clerk had just the week before gone live with the borough’s flood page on the town website (westwoodnj.gov, Residents, Flooding Information) linking visitors with archived correspondence between the borough, the state DEP, and the water company, on the borough “requesting a year-round maximum level of 91 feet.”

Related to this, on April 5, Arroyo said, the Westwood governing body adopted a resolution supporting state Sen. Holly Schepisi’s proposed Senate bill S-790 Flood Control Measures.

“This bill would require the state’s water management facilities to include flood mitigation protocols in their standard operating procedures. Such measures could compel pre-storm release of maxed-out holding vessels, which is where the Woodcliff Lake Reservoir was on Friday night.”

Separately, the 10 mayors comprising the Pascack Valley Mayors Association — representing the residents of Emerson, Hillsdale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Montvale, Oradell, Old Tappan, Township of Washington, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake — are meeting on flooding again next week. Arroyo promised an update.

Westwood’s flood page page offers resources under the headings Prepare, Respond, Recover.

It has links for Westwood OEM flood guide; flood insurance; flood insurance/community rating system; flood preparedness and mitigation; tracking storm conditions; flood safety; flood recovery; and flood archive.

It also explains, “Flooding occurs in Westwood along the Pascack and Musquapsink Brooks during severe rain events, although flooding may also occur in other areas of the borough due to various topographical and infrastructure conditions.”

It adds, “Stormwater runoff can elevate stream levels for hours, and even days, after the rain ends. Weather patterns to the north, including New York State, and the resultant drainage into the various brook tributaries, can result in flooding in our area well after a storm has passed.”

And it says, “With the Woodcliff Lake Reservoir to the north of Westwood, many residents consider the reservoir and dam operations to be a contributing factor to local flooding. The borough has no control over the operations of the dam or the reservoir.”

It says, “Seasonal water levels, and the release of water by Veolia (formerly Suez) prior to, during and after a storm event, are all subject to DEP regulations, which prioritize the preservation of the water asset and the structural integrity of the dam.”

Arroyo told residents:

Arroyo explained, “On March 30, I requested the DEP conduct an analysis comparing the accuracy of pre-storm rainfall predictions with actual rainfall, looking back over several years. The idea was to gauge how much of the water asset might have been lost had pre-release followed these predictions. And then compare those costs with the cost of property damage, emergency service costs, increased flood insurance premiums etc., generated by the standard operating procedure of holding the asset and accepting the resultant flooding.”

He said, “It seemed to me, if the DEP was instituting policies based upon climate change models anticipating more frequent and more severe rain events, that some significant part of the water inventory, let go in a pre-storm release, would presumably be replenished.”

He added, “Such a study might prove it more cost effective to take some sustainable financial loss on the water asset than continue to pay out damages and incur local service costs.”

The mayor said, “On April 29, I received an answer declining my request. … The dollars and cents of this cannot come close to capturing the mental trauma experienced by our flood residents. We on the governing body know that. We will continue to make sure your elected officials up the chain, the only ones who can mitigate your ongoing suffering, know that as well.”

On June 1, Arroyo told Pascack Press, “I got clarification from the borough attorney last night: The water company can manipulate the water level in the reservoir independent of the DEP. They are not precluded by law from doing so. However the DEP does not ‘recommend’ that the water company use this as a flood mitigation method.”

He said, “Whether their failure to do so is by law or by their regulatory agency’s (DEP) recommendation is largely a distinction without a difference. Neither Violia or the DEP have any incentive to move off the status quo.”

Arroyo said, “The flood residents have no leverage over the regulatory agency or the water company. The latter is a monopoly. The residents cannot take their money elsewhere. The water company cannot be shamed into operating differently.”

On June 1 we reached out to Deb Vial, spokesperson for Veolia in New Jersey, for comment. She wrote back promptly:

“The dams are operated under the strict oversight of the DEP and state regulators do not allow for the release of water ahead of storms. Regulators have good reason for this: The last time a release was ordered, the storm produced very little rainfall. That was followed by a severe drought, leaving depleted reservoirs struggling to meet the needs of millions of residents and businesses.”

She said, “The company’s reservoir system and its dams are built to protect the water supply, an essential resource, for 900,000 residents and businesses in Northern New Jersey. The reservoirs mitigate some flooding issues in the region by holding water. However, there are areas in traditional flood plains — flood plains that existed long before the reservoirs — where development should have been discouraged. That’s why the state has made buying homes in flood plains a priority through their Blue Acres program.”

Vial also said, “We understand that some areas have been impacted by development and we are working closely with municipalities to discuss to give them real time data on storms and reservoir levels. We have also offered to help them coordinate the clearing blockages in their stream beds.”

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